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Recommended home WiFi routers with emphasis on security?


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#1 Thelps

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Posted 20 June 2016 - 12:59 AM

I'm looking for some recommendations on Home WiFi Routers that emphasize security.

 

Specifically, Routers that support Password Lockouts (after a certain number of incorrect password attempts the router denies all login attempts for a set period of time) and routers that have a physical WiFi on/off switch to allow entirely hardwiring the network when required, removing the WiFi component entirely.

 

Also of concern are routers that are known to have easy firmware workarounds and 'backdoors', These are obviously out of the question.

 

The more extensive and precise the router's logging capabilities are is also important. This allows identification of unauthorized access.

 

Superior WiFi packet encryption built into the router is particularly useful, if available.

 

I'm in a densely populated urban area close to many hostels and universities. Consequently the local (and international) residents occasionally 'wardrive' the area and enjoy hacking unsecured hotspots.

 

If anyone can recommend home routers that meet some or all of the above requirements it would be very helpful!


Edited by Thelps, 20 June 2016 - 01:01 AM.


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#2 mjd420nova

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Posted 20 June 2016 - 12:34 PM

One approach to security is to prevent my WIFI signal from leaving the premises.  Mounting the unit centrally to the needed units gives all good signal strength.  If mounting near an outside wall, screens and foils can help block signals.  Even corner mounting can direct signals into an area while reducing usable signals in others.  Of course, Security, password protection, encryption and my favorite, MAC Address blocking, will help keep the nosy out but there's no protection from a hacker who really wants into your machines,  they will find a way.



#3 Thelps

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Posted 21 June 2016 - 02:04 AM

One approach to security is to prevent my WIFI signal from leaving the premises.  Mounting the unit centrally to the needed units gives all good signal strength.  If mounting near an outside wall, screens and foils can help block signals.  Even corner mounting can direct signals into an area while reducing usable signals in others.  Of course, Security, password protection, encryption and my favorite, MAC Address blocking, will help keep the nosy out but there's no protection from a hacker who really wants into your machines,  they will find a way.

I'm well aware of all of the above. Unfortunately, signal blocking is not an option due to lease agreements, and, as stated in my post, the signal will very easily reach 2 roads, a footpath and 7 other residences - that's when set at minimum signal strength.

 

You didn't really answer my question at all, unfortunately, but thanks for the interest.



#4 Kilroy

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Posted 23 June 2016 - 02:43 PM

Sounds like you want something like pfSense

 

"WiFi Routers that emphasize security." aren't necessarily secure.  Security can only be proven over time.

 

 "Routers that support Password Lockouts" password lock outs for what?  Accessing the router? Connecting to the wireless?

 

"routers that are known to have easy firmware workarounds and 'backdoors', " You should be more concerned about the workarounds and backdoors that haven't been made public.  Just because a router had a security issue doesn't mean that you should eliminated it.  How quickly was it identified and fixed?

 

"Superior WiFi packet encryption built into the router is particularly useful, if available."   WiFi encryption is going to be a standard and has to be compatible with the devices you will be connecting.  You want WPA2, but if the devices you are using to connect won't support WPA2 then you'll have to back down to what they support or replace them.

 

In the end it doesn't matter how secure the router is, if it isn't configured correctly.



#5 Thelps

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Posted 27 June 2016 - 10:22 AM

Thanks for the tips Kilroy. Especially the link to that website. I'm sure they'll come in handy for others browsing this thread.


Edited by Thelps, 27 June 2016 - 10:33 AM.





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