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Best external hardrive or storage


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8 replies to this topic

#1 bluekitty

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Posted 19 June 2016 - 10:46 PM

Hi,

 My father recently had his laptop crash and he lost all his pictures, documents, etc... He wants to go with a external hard drive now to protect his stuff.

What are some suggestions for a good device that is user friendly and not too pricey (under or around $100 would be good). He would just need it for

his pictures, documents and stuff like that. Thanks for the help.



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#2 neuronic

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Posted 20 June 2016 - 10:54 PM

How much space does he need to backup? 



#3 bluekitty

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Posted 21 June 2016 - 11:46 AM

I wouldn't think he would need more than 1TB. That is even probably more than he needs, I mainly want to make sure its user friendly and not too pricey since my parents

are on a fixed budget.



#4 RolandJS

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Posted 21 June 2016 - 12:21 PM

Is it too late to ask if the original hard-drive can be scanned and folders/files recovered?


"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#5 bluekitty

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Posted 21 June 2016 - 04:14 PM

Unfortunately he lost everything and started over from scratch. Luckily he is a pack rat when it comes to his financial papers has paper copies of all that, but he lost

all of my nieces pics and his navy pics and with a new grand baby on the way he doesn't want that to happen again.



#6 FrostytheDragon

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Posted 22 June 2016 - 09:12 PM

Depending on which brand you buy, terabyte drives can be purchased for less than $100. I'm using Verbatim. Never had a problem with it and have had one for 5 years and just got a new one. It's important to keep backups of important docs and pics.



#7 smax013

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Posted 26 June 2016 - 06:23 AM

Hi,
 My father recently had his laptop crash and he lost all his pictures, documents, etc... He wants to go with a external hard drive now to protect his stuff.
What are some suggestions for a good device that is user friendly and not too pricey (under or around $100 would be good). He would just need it for
his pictures, documents and stuff like that. Thanks for the help.


You can easily get a 1TB portable drive for under $100. You can actually get a 2 TB portable drive for under $100. Here is even a "desktop" 3 TB drive for under $100:

https://www.amazon.com/Seagate-Expansion-Desktop-External-STEB5000100/dp/B00TKFEEBW/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1466939050&sr=8-4&keywords=external+usb+hard+drive

As to brand, if you want to get a "off the shelf" USB external drive, then I generally say stick with either WD or Seagate. They do usually come with some included backup software, but personally I usually find third party backup software is better then what either WD or Seagate include...but that is just me. The included backup software is usually pretty user friendly, but they typically use a "proprietary" backup file format that requires the WD or Seagate backup software to restore/access the backed up files. Personally, I like backup programs that will backup the files in their "native" file format, which means you just plug in the drive if you need to recover the file and can navigate the drive using the regular Windows Explorer interface to find the file you need rather than the backup program. Of course, Windows has a built-in backup program that is fair good.

Ultimately, I would pick a drive that you like and not worry what software it comes with as you can find plenty of other good options for backup software.

I will note that personally I "build" my own external drives. That is that I typically buy an internal drive that I like and then buy an enclosure for it that I like. This originally came about due to the fact that I generally wanted to use Firewire drives before USB 3.0 came out as it was faster. Since Firewire was thought of as a Mac connection (my primary computers have been Macs for a while, but I also have Windows computers), you could not really find them in local stores and had to order them online from a company like LaCie. So, I started buying enclosures with Firewire ports and internal drive for the enclosures. This is less of an issue now with USB 3.0, although I have some Thunderbolt drives (for use with my Macs). Now, however, I generally don't like "off the self" external drives as their circuit board (for converting from USB to SATA3 that the internal drive would use) can permanently attached to the internal drive. This means that if there is a problem with the enclosure of such a WB or Seagate drive that is made this way, you cannot pull the internal drive out and put it in an enclosure to access you data on the internal drive. With my own "built" drives, if the enclosure flakes, then I pull out the internal drive and get a new enclosure...and if the internal drive flakes, then I get a new internal drive to put in the enclosure. It give me a little more comfort and control. Again, that is just me.

#8 RolandJS

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Posted 26 June 2016 - 06:41 AM

smax013, if you ever "publish" a tutorial on the steps for making such external HDs, immediately upon seeing it, I will bookmark it into my Chrome bookmarks.html!

addendum:  copiedNpasted smax's following post into my ExtHDbuilding[smax013].txt - onto my HD.


Edited by RolandJS, 26 June 2016 - 07:57 AM.

"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#9 smax013

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Posted 26 June 2016 - 07:06 AM

smax013, if you ever "publish" a tutorial on the steps for making such external HDs, immediately upon seeing it, I will bookmark it into my Chrome bookmarks.html!


There is no need really for a tutorial. The process is generally VERY easy. Most enclosures will come shipped with none of the screws installed, you can open up the enclosure right out of the box. You connect the internal SATA drive to the SATA port of the enclosure. For some enclosures, you then might use some screws to attach the internal drive to the "innards" of the enclosure (either through the holes in the side of internal drive or the bottom of the internal drive) to hold the internal drive in place...for others they might have some sort of "snap" piece that snaps into the screw holds of the internal drive. Then you usually put the cover of the enclosure back on (many of my drive, the cover slides over the "innards") and then put in several screws to hold the cover in place. Some might have a cover that snaps back on. Done.

There are variations. I have some desktop drive IcyDock enclosures that have a "tray" that you screw the internal drive to and then you slide that "tray" into the rest of the enclosure, which then locks into place and connects the internal drive to the SATA connection of the enclosure. There is then a level that allows you to release the "tray" and go a quick swap for another "tray" with a different drive.

They always come with instructions that are typically fairly clear.

If it helps, here is a link to a manual for one of the enclosures I use:

https://eshop.macsales.com/tech_center/manuals/owcmanmepmu3am_r3w.pdf

You can see that the process to "build" the drive is to 1) remove two screws from the back of the enclosure; 2) slide the "innards" of the enclosure out of the case; 3) slide the internal drive into the "innards" such that internal drive connects to the SATA port of the "innards"; 4) use the provided screws to attach the internal drive to the "innards" from the bottom of the "innards"; 5) slide the cover back on; and 6) put the two screws you removed earlier back in. Done.

Most enclosures are very similar and just as easy, if not easier, to put an internal drive in.

Once the internal drive is installed in the enclosure, it is just a matter of connecting the drive to the computer and formatting the drive as internal drive rarely come formatted (and for me, even if they did, they are likely FAT32 formatted and I usually use NTFS with Windows and HFS+ with Macs, so I would be reformatting them anyway).




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