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How best to move my apps from old Win10 PC to a new one?


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#1 muggo

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Posted 19 June 2016 - 02:41 PM

My current PC is running out of steam so I've bought a new one.  I do a lot of photo processing which needs a more powerful CPU so I've gone from AMD FX 4100 to Intel i7 2600k which I'll no doubt overclock.

The new one has a 250Gb SSD but the old has a 1Tb HD which contains all my app installs as well as Win.  It's 60% full.

I'd like to use the SSD for Win10, Lightroom app & my photos only so I get the best performance.  I'd like all my other apps to run from an external USB 3 HD if possible.  The new PC has plenty of free bays & SATA3 support so I could install the HD inside the PC if it would make a difference but I'm not too bothered if say Office loads a little slower.

I want to avoid having to install or download all my other apps again.  There are a lot of them & it would take ages to have to start again.  I'd like the old PC to remain intact so I can sell it as a working machine, including the 1Tb drive.

My current PC runs Win 10 64bit Pro & the new one is Win 10 but not sure of which version yet.  I imagine it's 64bit though.

 

I'd really appreciate some advice on how best to "transfer" the program files to the external HD & have them still work.  

If you need more information, please let me know.  Speccy snapshot of my current system attached.

 

 



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#2 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 19 June 2016 - 04:45 PM

Sorry - but you are going to have to re-install all your applications. The reason is that the applications have to tie in with the registry, and the only way to get them to do this is to install them.

 

I have never used an SSD myself, but virtually all the advice on BC is to put your OS and applications on the SSD and your data  - and you have a fair amount of it - on another drive. You could certainly use your 1TB hard drive in your new tower. Or, since you say you would like to sell the old computer 'complete', get a new 1 or 2TB drive and transfer your data to that and then remove all your own data from the old drive before putting it back into the old machine. The simplest and quickest way to do this, once you have your OS up and running on the SSD would be to put the old drive in one of your spare bays, connect it to a spare SATA connector and copy the data across. In any case, you will get quicker data transfer from an internal SATA drive than from an external drive connected by USB.

 

I sympathise with your desire to save work, but it ain't going to happen !  I have just had to do this with my own computer and I've got four hard drives in it - a 1TB with Windows on it, two for data and a 500GB for Linux. According to an error message I managed to get voltage regulation on the mobo had failed.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#3 muggo

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Posted 19 June 2016 - 05:45 PM

Sorry - but you are going to have to re-install all your applications. The reason is that the applications have to tie in with the registry, and the only way to get them to do this is to install them.

 

I have never used an SSD myself, but virtually all the advice on BC is to put your OS and applications on the SSD and your data  - and you have a fair amount of it - on another drive. You could certainly use your 1TB hard drive in your new tower. Or, since you say you would like to sell the old computer 'complete', get a new 1 or 2TB drive and transfer your data to that and then remove all your own data from the old drive before putting it back into the old machine. The simplest and quickest way to do this, once you have your OS up and running on the SSD would be to put the old drive in one of your spare bays, connect it to a spare SATA connector and copy the data across. In any case, you will get quicker data transfer from an internal SATA drive than from an external drive connected by USB.

 

I sympathise with your desire to save work, but it ain't going to happen !  I have just had to do this with my own computer and I've got four hard drives in it - a 1TB with Windows on it, two for data and a 500GB for Linux. According to an error message I managed to get voltage regulation on the mobo had failed.

 

Chris Cosgrove

Thanks Chris.  I was afraid that was going to be the case.

You raise an interesting point that data transfer on an internal disk will be faster than on USB3 external.  Maybe I'll take the drive from the external case & install it internally.



#4 aren111tarrow

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Posted 20 June 2016 - 05:32 AM

Got a new Windows 10 PC? Want to transfer your files, programs and settings from your old PC?

There are two ways to get that done: The hard and free way, or the easy and expensive way.

If you don't feel like shelling out money to transfer your stuff to a new PC, there's bad news: Windows no longer includes its Easy Transfer software that lets you automatically move files and settings between two PCs. So you're going to have to do everything manually.

Here are the steps to transfer files, programs and settings yourself:

1) Copy and move all your old files to a new disk. You'll need to move them all to an external drive, either in the cloud (such as Microsoft OneDrive, Google Drive, DropBox) or an external hard drive.

2) Download and install your programs onto the new PC. Transferring your files won't actually install any software programs on your new PC. You'll have to download them yourself from their respective websites or the Windows Store.

3) Adjust your settings. Remember how you painstakingly set up your old PC so it worked just the way you wanted it? You'll have to do that again, with every application and setting. Bummer.

If you already back up everything to the cloud or an external hard drive, and if you're more of a casual PC user, manual is probably the way to go. All of that shouldn't take you more than an hour.

But if you're a heavier PC user and doing all that transferring, downloading and adjusting sounds like a nightmare, there's good news: There is software that will do it all for you (for a fee).

Here are three good options:

1) Zinstall's "WinWin." The product will transfer everything -- programs, settings and files -- to your new PC for $119. It works over the Internet -- no cables needed. The company says transfers typically take two-three hours.

2) LapLink "PC Mover." Microsoft (MSFTTech30) partner that has been doing file transferring for decades, LapLink will transfer your programs, settings and files for $72. You'll need to order a physical box, though, which includes a transfer cable (the $72 includes the $12 shipping charge). So if you want to transfer your files tonight, you're out of luck.

3) EaseUS "Todo PCTrans." A $50 option that will let you transfer everything between two computers on the same network. You can even download a free trial that lets you transfer two applications gratis.



#5 muggo

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Posted 20 June 2016 - 06:21 AM

Got a new Windows 10 PC? Want to transfer your files, programs and settings from your old PC?

There are two ways to get that done: The hard and free way, or the easy and expensive way.

If you don't feel like shelling out money to transfer your stuff to a new PC, there's bad news: Windows no longer includes its Easy Transfer software that lets you automatically move files and settings between two PCs. So you're going to have to do everything manually.

Here are the steps to transfer files, programs and settings yourself:

1) Copy and move all your old files to a new disk. You'll need to move them all to an external drive, either in the cloud (such as Microsoft OneDrive, Google Drive, DropBox) or an external hard drive.

2) Download and install your programs onto the new PC. Transferring your files won't actually install any software programs on your new PC. You'll have to download them yourself from their respective websites or the Windows Store.

3) Adjust your settings. Remember how you painstakingly set up your old PC so it worked just the way you wanted it? You'll have to do that again, with every application and setting. Bummer.

If you already back up everything to the cloud or an external hard drive, and if you're more of a casual PC user, manual is probably the way to go. All of that shouldn't take you more than an hour.

But if you're a heavier PC user and doing all that transferring, downloading and adjusting sounds like a nightmare, there's good news: There is software that will do it all for you (for a fee).

Here are three good options:

1) Zinstall's "WinWin." The product will transfer everything -- programs, settings and files -- to your new PC for $119. It works over the Internet -- no cables needed. The company says transfers typically take two-three hours.

2) LapLink "PC Mover." Microsoft (MSFT, Tech30) partner that has been doing file transferring for decades, LapLink will transfer your programs, settings and files for $72. You'll need to order a physical box, though, which includes a transfer cable (the $72 includes the $12 shipping charge). So if you want to transfer your files tonight, you're out of luck.

3) EaseUS "Todo PCTrans." A $50 option that will let you transfer everything between two computers on the same network. You can even download a free trial that lets you transfer two applications gratis.

 

Thanks very much for the input.

At those prices, I guess I'll do it manually!



#6 RolandJS

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Posted 20 June 2016 - 06:26 AM

Muggo, how much is your time and energy worth?  If the above products actually work, think of all the hours and energy you, rather than geeking, will spending instead on what you do best -- making good money for you and yours, having family time with you and yours!  It's just a couple of thoughts, you must do what you believe is best   :)


Edited by RolandJS, 20 June 2016 - 06:26 AM.

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Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)





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