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Trying to get a job in IT


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#1 ufc2084

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Posted 17 June 2016 - 04:27 PM

So I currently just finished an A+ class and will be taking the certification test soon. I've been looking for any kind of beginning position in computers, but I mostly find people that want multiple years of experience. Is there a certain job I should be looking at for someone who is starting to get into the IT field ?



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#2 RolandJS

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Posted 17 June 2016 - 04:48 PM

Try giving your cover-letter and your resume to such places as [or similar to] Fry's Electronic's Computer Services department, Mr. Notebook's technician position[s], Altex Electronics' technician position[s].  You have to start creating experience somewhere.  I don't have knowledge about beginning IT jobs -- others here might be able to guide you concerning that area.


Edited by RolandJS, 17 June 2016 - 04:49 PM.

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http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

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#3 KingDavidlll

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Posted 19 June 2016 - 05:09 AM

Helpdesk level 1 is usually the starting point, then you can move to level 2 or administrator or something after 1-2 years usually if you only have a certificate.  Look on seek and just filter for IT. 



#4 Kilroy

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Posted 19 June 2016 - 08:37 AM

I'm with KingDavidlll, Help Desk is where you're going to want to start.  I don't know if A+ will be sufficient to be a bench tech at Frys (or other place).  Personally speaking I wouldn't want to be a bench tech at a retail company.  Anyone who has worked on other people's computers will tell you if it is a home computer they will blame you for anything that goes wrong after you worked on it.

 

Working on a Help Desk you'll normally have scripts or knowledge base articles to assist you.  If you want to break into the field you're most likely going to have to work temporary jobs.  Working temporary jobs has a lot of bonuses for you.  You get to see how things work at different companies.  You gain experience with different software and technologies.  The more you know the easier it is to learn new things and increase your value.


Edited by Kilroy, 19 June 2016 - 08:38 AM.


#5 ufc2084

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Posted 19 June 2016 - 09:33 AM

Thanks everyone for the quick responses. It seams like Help Desk would make the most sense to start with.



#6 RolandJS

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Posted 20 June 2016 - 06:06 AM

Perhaps you can gain part-time experience within a business-computer environment, working with fellow techs on servers and business computers [desktops and laptops]; you see the hardware and software "live [long i]," helping make you stronger within the full-time help desk positions.  The others posters are right, full-time helpdesk is a very good way to start!


Edited by RolandJS, 20 June 2016 - 06:07 AM.

"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#7 VincePolston

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Posted 22 June 2016 - 10:52 AM

Good for you on finishing your class and getting ready for the certification. I get your frustration. Every place wants work experience but are not willing to give it. Maybe you can pick up something part time for a local non-profit for about 6 months to get some work experience? It may not be a paid position but it would look great on your resume.

 

Also be sure to keep searching through job listings. I'm sure you will come across something. Wasn't sure on your location so these links are just their general listings, use the search function. Try searching for helpdesk positions.

Also be sure to show your people-skills to potential employers once you get your foot in the door for an interview. Technicians are available everywhere. Technicians with social skills; not so much.

 

Hope that helps, my friend. Good luck!


Edited by VincePolston, 22 June 2016 - 10:52 AM.


#8 ranchhand_

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Posted 22 June 2016 - 02:50 PM

The following applies to the USA, I don't know about Europe or other countries.

I am not trying to be a downer here, but I will throw in my thoughts. In the beginning, years ago in the 80's and mid-90's, there was a huge need for IT personnel, so much so that businesses were actually willing to train you if you showed any ability at all. Around 9/11 that all ended. Job Monster used to have 50 pages of IT employment possibilities, it suddenly dropped to 3 or 4. Now, if you don't have a degree from an accredited university, companies won't even talk to you. If you have a degree in IT, you can get an entry level position and eventually move into a decent paying job. Both my wife and I were both in IT for many years and have watched its history over a span of 30 years.

Now, understand that I am talking about eventually reaching a career level of 6 figures. There are tons of techs out there with A+ and even MCSE certifications. Certifications without experience and/or a college degree mean nothing to a prospective corporate employer, but a degree from a recognized university does.

Ok, hold on, before someone gets a red face and reaches for his keyboard, listen up: I worked for a pro IT corporation for years, and we had lots of IT support techs with A+ certifications in back. They were all overworked, stressed, and not making enough money to support their families, so their household had to have multiple incomes to survive. A young man who grew up with my kids (they were all friends together) graduated from U. of Illinois with a degree in systems IT, was hired immediately into a $40,000 entry level job, and after 4 years he was into low 6 after a job change.

I am only posting this because I feel sorry for the very capable young men who love technology and want to work in it, but after years still can't make a decent living.

Just one man's opinion.


Help Requests: If there is no reply after 3 days I remove the thread from my answer list. For further help PM me.


#9 RolandJS

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Posted 23 June 2016 - 07:23 AM

ranchhand, +1.  I wish our friend God-speed in finding the employment that will lead to a successful career of accomplishing missions and goals.


"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#10 Kilroy

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Posted 23 June 2016 - 01:13 PM

I agree with ranchhand_ it is harder to get into IT these days.  Back when I started in the mid 1990s it was all new.  I start in IT when each department had a PC, now everyone has at least one and a smart phone.

 

I'm not wild about employers demanding a degree.  For those attempting to break into IT I have a hard time saying, "Go $60,000, or more in debt so you can get a $30,000 a year job with a company that doesn't care about you."  In my case my degree would be 27 years old if I had one I would know all about FORTRAN and COBOL, tell me how helpful that is in today's world. My four years of PATRIOT Missile System Maintenance training and experience doesn't count for anything.

 

Even if you get a degree you then have the problem that you have no experience.  So, if you're getting a degree make sure you get the related certifications at the same time.

 

You need two of these three, certification, college degree, or experience, to have the best chance of employment you need all three.  Contract work is much easier to get and will get you the experience you need to be successful.



#11 ranchhand_

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Posted 23 June 2016 - 06:13 PM

@ Kilroy:  Exactly, straight on, bro.

Experience is still the best guy to have on your side. No question. Ask any person with more degrees than a thermometer and (if he's honest) he will admit that he really started learning when he walked in to his first router room in a major corporation and almost had kittens at what he saw.  Suddenly the system goes down, and 2 VPs ran down from the 8th floor and stand over him as he tried to figure out why the system crashed. Just when he thought he was  going to get fired on the spot, an old guy with the company for 12 years and with no degree walks in, goes into the log-in for the Berlin branch network and makes a couple of changes for the log-in settings with a reboot, the system comes back up and the Veeps go back upstairs.

The old timer grins at the guy and says:

"Crap, it's 8AM in the Berlin branch and everybody hits the login screens at the same time. Crashes the system. I told them 3 years ago to get a separate login server but they don't want to spend the money."

 

The problem is getting experience. These corporate clones are educated to a degree. Their minds snap shut if no degree. So, you get a degree and that allows you to have on-the-job training so you get your experience. It's not fair, but I didn't make the game, I just have to play by the rules. C'est la vie


Help Requests: If there is no reply after 3 days I remove the thread from my answer list. For further help PM me.


#12 ufc2084

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Posted 23 June 2016 - 08:26 PM

Thank you guys so much for all the feedback. It's been really helpful. 



#13 VincePolston

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Posted 24 June 2016 - 10:16 AM

Very welcome! Good luck!



#14 Orange Blossom

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Posted 27 June 2016 - 12:50 AM

If you do go the degree route, I'd suggest doing your best to get an internship.  The internship will GIVE you experience.  Work-study positions in your field would also be of benefit.  Also, look into local non-profits to see if they could use IT assistance.  It would be volunteer work, but it would give you that much needed experience.

 

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#15 Kilroy

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Posted 27 June 2016 - 09:52 AM

I'll second Orange Blossom on the degree / intern route.  The college should be able to assist you in companies that they work with for internships.  You may even get a job with the company you intern with after graduation.






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