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Win7 Reinstall: Can Activations and Settings be saved this way?


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#1 kalmly

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Posted 09 June 2016 - 08:39 AM

My hard drive had a bad block.  I purchased a new one, cloned the old one, and took the computer to a tech shop to have the new drive installed and everything transferred over.  To make the clone, I used AOMEI Backupper, which puts the MBR in one partition and everything else on the other. -- At least that is how I understand it, and I saw the 2 partitions.

Techman called me the next day to say he had installed the new drive, BUT the clone had failed to backup the MBR, and so he would have to do a clean install of Windows. He further said that everything else (on the clone) was intact, but I would have to reinstall all of my applications. Without going into details, I will simply say that I told him not to do anything else, that I would come and get the computer.

Upwards of 75 applications were installed, all requiring activations, all customized to my specifications. My most needed app may cost me $100 for a new activation and, based on past experience,  take me at least a week to get up and running.  

Now to my questions:   Would it work to copy (from the clone) all the programs, files, etc. over to the new drive and then restore the registry from the Erunt Registry backup I ran just before disaster struck? Would that restore my activations and my settings?



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#2 dc3

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Posted 09 June 2016 - 09:02 AM

Please run chkdsk /r
 
Chkdsk /r checks for bad sectors on the HDD and recovers any readable information.
 
Attention:  If this is a SSD do not run the /r switch, instead run chkdsk /f.
 
Click on the Start orb rsz_1rsz_1rsz_start_orb_zpshjewtibd.png, then type in cmd in the Search programs and files box.  When cmd is seen in Programs above the Search box right click on it, then click on Run as administrator.
 
You will see a screen similar to the one below.
 
Screenshot2.jpg
 
Copy and paste chkdsk /r in the command prompt, then press Enter.  Please note:   
 
You will receive the message "CHKDSK cannot be run because it is in use by another process.  Would you like to schedule this volume to be checked the next time the system restarts?  <Y/N>".
 
Type in Y and press Enter.
 
Restart your computer to start the scan.
 
This will take a while to run, please be patient and allow it to complete the scan.
 
When the scan is finished please download and run ListChkdskResult.
 
This will open Notepad with the results of the chkdsk scan.  Please copy and then paste this log in your topic.

Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#3 kalmly

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Posted 09 June 2016 - 09:19 AM

Umm. I must have miscommunicated some way.

 

The old drive was bad. One day when I turned on the computer, Windows wanted to run a ck. It did that, but ever after there were many errors - bad block - to be found in Event Viewer.  And, I ran chkdsk several times myself. Although it seemed to boot and run fine. The drive has already been replaced. I have not yet started to Install Windows on the new drive. Before I do that, I wanted to find out if it is possible to salvage my activations and settings, or if I am going to have to start all over again.



#4 dc3

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Posted 09 June 2016 - 10:13 AM

What is the make and model of this computer?

 

If the computer has a system recovery partition you may be better off using it rather than a cloned image of the C: drive partition.  Since there are sectors where chkdsk /r was unable to recovery the data from the sector there may be missing files in the image.

 

As for activating the operating system.  If this is a OEM installation you can activate the operating system as needed as long as it is the same version that was originally installed. 


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#5 kalmly

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Posted 09 June 2016 - 10:26 AM

I am still somehow miscommunicating.  The drive in question is no longer in the computer. There are no missing files in the image, only the MBR.

 

I am not concerned about activating the system. I am concerned about setting up and activating 75+ applications, one of which will cost $100.

 

My question is:  Would using  the Erunt registry backup - which is available on the clone along with all my other applications - help me avoid having to reinstall, setup and activate/register all my applications.

 

P.S.  Of course, now I'm having other problems. Installing. I will post that in another thread.



#6 dc3

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Posted 09 June 2016 - 11:14 AM

If you purchased any of your programs online the vendor should be able to confirm your purchase via your email address and help facilitate the activation of the programs.

 

In order to repair the missing MBR you will need the installation disc for this version of Windows 7 (32-bit or 64-bit).  If you have this disc or can borrow one from a friend you can do a Repair Installation which will take you to the System Recovery Options.  One of the options is Command Prompt.  When Command prompt opens run the to commands below, press Enter after each command.

 

bootrec.exe /fixmbr
 
bootrec.exe /fixboot
 

Repair Installation Instructions
 
Attention:  In order to boot from the installation disc you may need to change the boot order in the BIOS so that the optical driver is the first device in the boot order, and the HDD/SSD is the second devcice.
 
1.  Place the installation disc in the tray of the CD/DVD drive, close the tray and restart the computer.
 
2.  You will be prompted to press any key to start the installation, do so.
 
At this point the setup process will load files, this will take several minutes.
 
3.  You will now need to choose the  Language, Time and currency format, and Keyboard or input method that you'd like to use.
 
After this is done click on Next.
 
w71_zps6dbda47e.png
 
4.  Click on the Repair your computer link at the bottom-left of the Install Windows window.
 
This link will begin the Windows 7 System Recovery Options.
 
w72_zps2a656a0c.png
 
5.  System Recovery Options will now search your hard drive(s) for any Windows 7 installations.  This will take several minutes.
 
No participation is required on your part at this time, wait till it has finished and the next window opens.
 
w73_zpsd5483f05.png
 
6.  Choose the Windows 7 installation that you'd like to perform the Startup Repair on, then click on Next
 
w74_zps490f9a17.png
 
7.  Click on the Command Prompt link from list of recovery tools in System Recovery Options.
 
w75_zps9941e858.png
 
8.  When the Command Prompt opens copy and paste the two commands one at a time followed by pressing Enter for each command.
 
bootrec.exe /fixmbr

 
bootrec.exe /fixboot
 
 
If the operating system has other problems you can use the Startup Repair option to repair any missing files.
 

7.  Click on the Startup Repair link from list of recovery tools in System Recovery Options.
 
w75_zps9941e858.png
 
For a future reference, there are several other diagnostic and recovery tools available in the Windows 7 System Recovery Options including System Restore, System Image Recovery, Windows Memory Diagnostic, and Command Prompt.
 
8.  The Startup Repair tool will now search for problems in the system files.
 
If Startup Repair finds a problem with any system files the tool may suggest a solution which you will need to confirm, or may solve the problem automatically.
 
w76_zps3dd75d83.png
 
9.  Startup Repair will now attempt to repair whatever problems it found with system files.  
 
Note:  If Startup Repair did not find any problems with system files you won't see this step.
 
w77_zpsd8be95eb.png
 
Important: Your computer may or may not restart several times during this repair process.  This is normal, you should allow it to continue until you see the Restart your computer to complete the repairs window. 
 
10.  Click on Finish, this will restart your computer.
 
w78_zpsd49257fb.png
 
It is possible that the Startup Repair will not be able to fix the problem.  If the Startup Repair tool determines this, it may automatically run the the repair after your computer restarts.  If it does not automatically run the repair but you are still having problems with Windows 7 repeat these steps to run Startup Repair again manually.
 

 

bootrec.exe /fixmbr
 
bootrec.exe /fixboot

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#7 kalmly

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Posted 09 June 2016 - 02:08 PM

Thank you for all the good information. I am copying it to save for later reference. At the moment, it is much to late to use. The can no longer access the drive to "repair" it. Of course it is possible to spend days installing and registering the applications. I was trying to save myself weeks of work and some $.

 

Any thoughts on my question about restoring the registry?






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