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Extend Windows 10ís 30-Day Limit for Rolling Back to Windows 7 or 8.1


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#1 saw101

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Posted 08 June 2016 - 02:44 PM

After upgrading to Windows 10, you have 30 days–about a month–to roll back to Windows 7 or 8.1 if you so desire. After that, Windows takes the option away from you. But there’s a way to extend this time limit at the cost of some disk space.

 

Full Article Here: http://www.howtogeek.com/257750/how-to-extend-windows-10s-30-day-limit-for-rolling-back-to-windows-7-or-8.1/


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#2 JohnC_21

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Posted 08 June 2016 - 02:57 PM

I would think the better option would be to do a complete disk image before the install if possible. Has anybody confirmed if your previous Windows will stay activated after the 30 day limit. I say this because if the activation remains the same then it's possible to either revert back to Windows 10 after the July cutoff date or have a dual boot computer with both Windows 10 and the previous OS. Not legal and I can't understand why Microsoft would continue to let people do this. 



#3 britechguy

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Posted 08 June 2016 - 03:30 PM

John,

 

          It is not legal to dual boot Windows 10 with the Windows 7 or Windows 8.1 that was used as the basis for an upgrade.  While the license for either basis OS is not voided, as I have known of people do restore from a system image after 30 days, it's stated somewhere in the licensing agreement.  If you had a single user license of WIndows 7, and have upgraded to Windows 10, it's considered to be the same single user license for a Windows operating system.

 

          As you say, I have little doubt that it's probably possible to dual boot with Windows 10 and the earlier Windows that you upgraded to get it, it's definitely not legal to do so.

 

          I don't know how assiduous Microsoft is about keeping tabs on this sort of thing.  I will note that I am NOT encouraging, in any way, someone to do anything that violates a licensing agreement.  I have seen instances where Microsoft Office that has a single user license has been successfully installed on multiple machines from the same discs and using the same license number without having been uninstalled on other machines.  This suggests to me that Microsoft can sometimes be very lax about cross-checking with regard to licenses.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#4 britechguy

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Posted 08 June 2016 - 10:22 PM

I asked for a bit more detail on Windows 10 licensing on answers.microsoft.com, and got a lot more.  See, Windows 10 License Agreement when upgrading from an earlier version of Windows.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#5 JohnC_21

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Posted 09 June 2016 - 07:15 AM

OEM versions allow all hardware upgrades except for an upgrade to a different model motherboard

 

I have heard of people who call Microsoft and explain the motherboard went bad on an OEM and they were good enough to activate the OS with the new motherboard.

 

So just to confirm. If a person images the drive with Windows 7 then installs Windows 10 and images it after 30 days the Windows 7 license is still valid and if that person later decides to image the computer back to Windows 10, the Windows 10 license is still valid? Seems like a nobrainer to me.



#6 britechguy

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Posted 09 June 2016 - 08:55 AM

John_C21 wrote:  "So just to confirm. If a person images the drive with Windows 7 then installs Windows 10 and images it after 30 days the Windows 7 license is still valid and if that person later decides to image the computer back to Windows 10, the Windows 10 license is still valid? Seems like a nobrainer to me."

 

Yes, once Windows 10 has been legally licensed for a given piece of hardware that license remains in force.  If the license is as the result of an upgrade you remain legally licensed to run either the original Windows version, Windows 10 derived from that upgrade, but NOT both at the same time on that piece of hardware (or split across two pieces of hardware).  If you buy a second license for one or the other version then it's entirely legal to dual boot or load up another machine.

 

It has always seemed obvious to me that if you had a single license, and that license was the base license used as part of the free upgrade process, that the resulting license for the upgrade remained single and that the base license is now valid if and only if downgrading.  No software company I know is going to give a "two for one" on this scale and, since the whole purpose is to promote migration to Windows 10, it would make absolutely no sense for them to do so.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 





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