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Question about passwords on Windows 10 computers.


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#1 English Teacher

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Posted 06 June 2016 - 02:27 PM

Hi,

 

Several months ago, November, my wife bought a HP laptop computer with Windows 8.1 on it. As soon as she got it, I installed Windows 10 and it asked me for a email address for logging in.

I entered mine xxx@hotmail.com   and, of course, it was accepted.

 

Today, I installed Windows 10 on my Asus laptop, which had Windows 7 on. This time however I was NEVER asked to enter an email address.

 

So I have a few questions:

 

1 Can I ask why one computer asked for it and the other did not during installation?

 

2 Is it possible to stop my wife's computer from asking for a password?

 

3 Is it possible to change the email even?

 

Thanks for any info

 


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#2 britechguy

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Posted 06 June 2016 - 02:40 PM

Answers:

 

1. Since Windows 8 Microsoft has made it standard practice to "guide" you to creating a Microsoft Account that also doubles as your login account on your Windows machine as well.  Windows 7 has only local accounts, and if you did an in-place upgrade to Windows 10 the local account(s) are carried along with it.

 

2. Yes.  See  Sign in User Account Automatically at Windows 10 Startup.

 

3.  Yes.  But it's been so long since I've even thought about this that the only thing that's coming to mind that I know will allow you to do it is changing from a Microsoft Account for login to a local account.  I'm certain someone else can chime in on this one.  I know that you can tweak your aliases for your actual Microsoft Account, including adding alternate e-mail addresses and phone numbers, but I don't think that propagates "down" to the computer in terms of changing your Windows 10 login to the machine.  I could be wrong, but since I did change my password on my Microsoft Account on their website, and it has never propagated down to the Win10 laptop I use, I have no reason to believe other changes would, either.


Edited by britechguy, 06 June 2016 - 02:42 PM.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

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#3 English Teacher

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Posted 06 June 2016 - 03:06 PM

Hi Britechguy,

 

Thank you very much for the info.

The Windows 7 today just upgraded to 10 leaving all my files intact. I downloaded 10 and made a bootable DVD. I upgraded as I've read that you can roll back to the previous version of Windows within 30 days if needed. Hope not but I made an Image of Win 7 before the upgrade.

 

One last thing, I think, when Windows 10 updates, is there a way to control this? In the way to say what I want to download and when etc?

 

Thanks again.


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If at first you do succeed, try not to look surprised.

#4 britechguy

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Posted 06 June 2016 - 04:58 PM

English,

 

        If you followed the upgrade path (using GWX, or the Media Creation Tool website's "Upgrade Now" button, or an actual Win10 DVD created from the ISO using upgrade (which you did if you kept files) you do have 30 days to roll back to Windows 7 should you so choose.  I would definitely find your Windows.old file and make a copy of it somewhere else just for safekeeping.

 

        You cannot control what updates Windows Update applies unless you have Enterprise edition, which most of us don't.  You can change things from "full automatic" which will restart your computer on its own to "Notify to restart" to allow you to pick the restart time yourself once updates have been downloaded and applied, but that need a restart to complete the process.  Even this will not allow you to ignore restarting forever.  It will schedule a time, but quite a bit later than "now" so that you have plenty of time to choose a reasonable reboot time for you.  This is in the Update & Security Settings -> Advanced Options.

 

         Microsoft has made the business decision that it wishes to maintain as much consistency in Windows 10 as is possible, and this means applying all updates that they believe necessary.  Given the number of piles of "cyber rubble" I've had to try to put back together because someone decided that they didn't want to apply any updates, and didn't do so for years, I have to agree with them.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

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#5 dhjohns

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Posted 06 June 2016 - 05:03 PM

Given the number of piles of "cyber rubble" I've had to try to put back together because someone decided that they didn't want to apply any updates, and didn't do so for years, I have to agree with them.

Absolutely, so many computers were getting infected simply because people were lazy, stupid, or scared to install updates.



#6 britechguy

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Posted 06 June 2016 - 05:14 PM

 

Given the number of piles of "cyber rubble" I've had to try to put back together because someone decided that they didn't want to apply any updates, and didn't do so for years, I have to agree with them.

Absolutely, so many computers were getting infected simply because people were lazy, stupid, or scared to install updates.

 

 

And, yet, you'll get the endless stream of people acting as though the very, very rare "bad" or "buggy" update is a daily occurrence when these tend to happen once every few years, at most.  Windows 10 has already demonstrated that its system health telemetry can tell Microsoft that something is "off" with a given update and then they stop its continued roll out to figure out what's wrong.  That's happened at least once to me, personally, where a given update was problematic and the "patched patch" was out within 24 hours or so.

 

No one knows better what's appropriate or necessary for the "care and feeding" of an operating system than the very people who developed it and are maintaining it.  Second guessing them, particularly by blocking all updates as happened all too frequently, is the way to madness and disaster.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#7 dhjohns

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Posted 06 June 2016 - 05:27 PM

I love the Windows 10 telemetry, and not for this reason alone, but this reason is a main part of it.



#8 English Teacher

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Posted 09 June 2016 - 11:15 AM

Hi britechguy and dhjohns,

 

It's not that I don't want to not do any installs at all.

What I did up until was to wait for a few days and then update. I decided to play the few days waiting game as at work, a few years ago, 7 computers had to be reformatted completely due to a bad update. This update was deleted from the monthly update shortly afterwards by MS.

However, another problem is that my wife spent about half an hour more at work as her computer decided to start installing the updates without any warning.

 

Both our computers have Windows 10 Home and are 64 bit.

 

I will find the "Windows.old" file and back it up

 

Thanks anyway for the heads-up on these.


Edited by English Teacher, 09 June 2016 - 11:18 AM.

It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and remove all doubt.
Never argue with stupid people, they'll just bring you down to their level and beat you with experience.
If at first you do succeed, try not to look surprised.

#9 britechguy

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Posted 09 June 2016 - 11:35 AM

As I said, you can set up Windows Update to not be "full automatic" in the literal sense of it shutting down the computer because that's needed to complete installation of an update.

 

Settings -> Update & Security -> Windows Update Pane -> Advanced Options Link  then, once there, change the dropdown from "Automatic (recommended)" to "Notify to schedule restart"


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 





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