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How much space is needed to back up a brand new laptop with Win10?


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#1 Toshiba2015

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Posted 06 June 2016 - 01:34 PM

I'm planning to get a new laptop soon and I have the old hard drive from my previous one (250GB) and was thinking of using it for backing up my new computer with the use of a SATA / USB adaptor.  However, I was looking at flash drives in the store and noticing how incredibly cheap they have become.  So I was considering the purchase of either a 32GB or 64GB flash drive for the purpose of creating a system image of the new laptop as soon as I turn it on for the first time so there wouldn't be any extra stuff.  What size of device would I need to accomplish this?  Would a 32GB flash drive be enough?  Or would I need 64GB (or more?)



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#2 JohnC_21

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Posted 06 June 2016 - 01:45 PM

I would recommend a HDD over a flash drive for data backups. Flash drives only have a certain amount of writes before they go bad and if you format the flash drive as NTFS there will be even more writes to the flash drive. You want multiple disk image backups and 64GB is not enough. You can get a USB 1TB external drive for about $55.

 

For creating disk images I recommend either Macrium Free or Aomei Backupper. Be sure to create the bootable recovery media. This will let you restore disk images if the computer no longer boots to Windows or if replacing the hard drive.

 

http://www.macrium.com/reflectfree.aspx

 

http://www.backup-utility.com/free-backup-software.html



#3 Toshiba2015

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Posted 06 June 2016 - 01:58 PM

I would recommend a HDD over a flash drive for data backups. Flash drives only have a certain amount of writes before they go bad and if you format the flash drive as NTFS there will be even more writes to the flash drive. You want multiple disk image backups and 64GB is not enough. You can get a USB 1TB external drive for about $55.

 

For creating disk images I recommend either Macrium Free or Aomei Backupper. Be sure to create the bootable recovery media. This will let you restore disk images if the computer no longer boots to Windows or if replacing the hard drive.

 

http://www.macrium.com/reflectfree.aspx

 

http://www.backup-utility.com/free-backup-software.html

Thanks for those!  BTW, what do you think of just using DVD disks to create the system image?  I did that with my former laptop and then when I needed it, there were a bunch of drivers and other things missing.  It took about 2 months to get it working right again, and then I had to run it in "test mode" for the rest of its life.  I'm not sure if saving the image to DVDs was the reason this problem happened, or simply because it was a Toshiba.  :smash:



#4 JohnC_21

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Posted 06 June 2016 - 02:00 PM

I don't recommend DVD's because if one becomes bad you are sunk and they are too slow. A USB 3.0 HDD can backup 40GB in about 20 minutes or so.



#5 britechguy

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Posted 06 June 2016 - 02:28 PM

I will second John_C21's position.  Unless you are someone who has no cash to spare these days a 1 to 2TB USB 3.0 portable backup drive that's about the size of a pack of cigarettes is generally under $100, very often well under $100.  I personally prefer the portable versions because they have proven to be far more reliable in my experience than the desktop units, but that's for each person to decide.

 

Since you should be taking data backups on a regular basis, and so far I'm liking the built-in File History feature of Windows 10 very well, you are far better off having a backup drive that you can just keep attached to the computer during those periods where it's stationary if it's a laptop or constantly if it's a desktop.  The drives don't run constantly and will spin up when called upon and spin down after a period of inactivity.

 

System images should ideally be taken when a system is brand new then periodically thereafter.  My metric for "periodically" is "after I've done enough that I'd be really PO-ed if I had to redo it.  I know some who can take a system image after they've customized their computer post initial setup and virtually never need another.  I know others who are installing and uninstalling and tweaking things endlessly and who need to take system images on a more regular basis.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

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#6 usasma

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Posted 06 June 2016 - 02:56 PM

Just for those interested, I'll ask a friend to post his method of making custom refresh points.
That modifies the standard .wim file into one that contains your updates/modifications.

That way, when you go to Refresh/Reset your system - it'll come back with all your stuff on it.


My browser caused a flood of traffic, sio my IP address was banned. Hope to fix it soon. Will get back to posting as soon as Im able.

- John  (my website: http://www.carrona.org/ )**If you need a more detailed explanation, please ask for it. I have the Knack. **  If I haven't replied in 48 hours, please send me a message. My eye problems have recently increased and I'm having difficult reading posts. (23 Nov 2017)FYI - I am completely blind in the right eye and ~30% blind in the left eye.<p>If the eye problems get worse suddenly, I may not be able to respond.If that's the case and help is needed, please PM a staff member for assistance.

#7 FreeBooter

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Posted 06 June 2016 - 06:18 PM

Creating a Windows Backup Image

WBAdmin (WBAdmin.exe) is a command-line utility built into Windows Vista, Windows Server 2008, Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows 8, Windows 8.1 Windows 10 and Windows Server 2012 . The command is used to perform backups and restores of operating systems, drive volumes, files, folders, and applications from a command-line interface. WBAdmin is a disk based backup system. WBAdmin can create a "bare metal" backup used to restore the Windows operating system to similar OR dissimilar hardware. The Backup file(s) created are primarily in the form of Microsoft's "Virtual Hard Disk" (.VHD) files with some accompanying .xml configuration files. The backup .VHD file can be mounted in Windows Disk Manager to view content. However, the .VHD backup file is not a direct "disk clone". The backed up image can later be restored through the Windows Recovery Environment either to the same computer or to a new computer of different brand and type.




Useful information!
WBAdmin replaces the previous Microsoft Windows Backup command-line utility, NTBackup, which came built into Windows NT 4.0, Windows 2000, Windows XP and Windows Server 2003. It is the command-line version of Backup and Restore.




Before you can schedule a complete PC backup you need the following:

  • You must be running Windows Vista Ultimate, Business, or Enterprise.
  • You must be running Windows 7 Ultimate, Professional, or Enterprise.
  • You must be running Windows 8, Windows 8.1 and Windows 10.

Creating an image of your computer enables you to restore all your programs, personal data, and Windows settings without reinstalling Windows manually, reinstalling every application, and then copying your personal data back over. When something bad happens, such as a hard drive failure or Windows being broken beyond repair, it is better to restore your computer from an image.
To get started, you will need an administrative-level command prompt:

1. Open the Start screen and type Cmd.exe.
2. Right-click the Cmd.exe icon and then select Run As Administrator.
3. When the command prompt loads, run the following command to create a backup of your entire Windows install:
 

wbadmin start backup -allCritical -backupTarget:D:


Replace D: drive letter with a drive letter where you want your backup to be stored.
It can be the drive letter of any drive in your PC or connected via USB, but cannot be the drive that you are backing up.
You can also replace d: with a UNC network path. For example:
 

wbadmin start backup -allCritical -backupTarget:\\servername\sharename


4. If the command was entered properly, you receive a confirmation screen asking you if you want to start the backup operation, type Y and your backup will begin.
When finished, store your backup data in a safe place.

Windows System Repair Disc can be created containing the Windows Recovery Environment (WinRE) i recommend creating a Windows Repair Disc to anybody without a Windows OS installation DVD.

Create a Windows Vista System Repair Disc

The Service Pack 1 must be install to create a Windows System Repair Disc from Windows Vista.
Program that creates a Windows System Repair Disc can be started from "Start Menu --> All Programs --> Maintenance --> Create a Recovery Disc". Follow the instructions to create a Windows System Repair Disk you will need either a blank CD or DVD.


Create a Windows 7 System Repair Disc

Open the "Backup and Restore" by clicking the "Start Menu --> Control Panel --> System and Maintenance --> Backup and Restore" and In the left pane, click “Create a system repair disc”. You will need a blank CD or DVD and then just follow the instructions to create a Windows Repair Disk.


Create a Windows 8, 8.1 System Repair Disc

Open the Search charm by dragging your mouse to the top or bottom right corners of the screen or press WinKey + Q keys and type Recover into Search charm and click Create a recovery drive to create USB recovery drive which will include WinRE and optionally Windows OS factory recover image.
You will need empty USB Flash Drive or blank CD or DVD if you click “Create a system repair disk with a CD or DVD” option on the Connect USB flash drive screen.


Create a Windows 10 Recovery Drive

Even if your PC can't start, you can use the Recovery drive to reset it or troubleshoot problems. If you back up system files to this drive, you'll also be able to use it to reinstall Windows.
Open your Start menu, type RecoveryDrive.exe in the search box, press Enter key.
Check or Uncheck the Back up system files to the recovery drive box for what you want to do, and click on Next button.
Select the USB flash drive (ex: "E:\ (USB)" ) you want to make a recovery drive, and click on Next button.
When ready to start, click on Create button.
 

Useful information!
Back up system files to the recovery drive will require that the USB flash drive is large (at least 8-16 GB) enough for this.

Some people are getting a We can't create the recovery drive - A problem occurred while creating the recovery drive error message with Back up system files to the recovery drive checked.

If you have this issue, then leaving Back up system files to the recovery drive unchecked should allow it to successfully create a recovery drive



In the event your computer wont boot up or you replace hard disk drive and you will like to restore your backup system image, you need to boot up into the System Recovery Options (for Windows Vista and Windows 7) or Advanced Startup Menu (for Windows 8, 8.1 and 10) which lets you start Windows in advanced troubleshooting modes. You can use the custom-made System Repair Disc or Windows Installation DVD to boot computer into WinRE.


 
Restore Windows 8,8.1 and 10 backup image

You can restore backup system image from Windows 8, 8.1 and 10 System Repair Disc or Windows installation disc (if you have one).

1. Attach the external hard drive on which you stored the backup image.

2. Boot to the recovery media.

3. Select your keyboard layout if asked.

4. Click Troubleshoot.

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5. Click Advanced Options.

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6. Select System Image Recovery. The Re-image Your Computer utility loads and searches for your backup files.

yD4hCmT.png?1
 
7. Pick the Select A System Image option and click Next. All backup locations discovered display, so you can connect to a network location as well.

8. Select a backup location to restore from and click Next. Alternatively, if you want to restore from a backup on a network location, click Advanced and then Search For A System Image on the network. Connect to your network and enter the full UNC path to the backup files. Once your files are found, your backup location shows up on the list just like files on an attached hard drive.

9. Choose the specific system image from all available images on the backup target and click Next.

10. On the Restore Options screen do not check the box that says Format And Re-partition Disks. I have not had any success restoring backups with that option set but you can try it yourself if you have same issue as me then do not check the box that says Format And Re-partition Disks. Simply click Next to move to the next screen.

11. Click Finish and then Yes on the confirmation screen.

At this point the restore begins. It can take a few hours depending how big your backup data is. When it is finished, your PC reboots and is ready for use.

 
Restore Windows Vista and Windows 7 backup image
You can restore backup system image from Windows Vista and 7 System Repair Disc or Windows installation disc (if you have one).

1. Insert the Windows Vista or Windows 7 installation disc or system repair disc.

2. Restart your computer using the computer's power button.

If prompted, press any key to start the computer from the installation disc or system repair disc.

GPNDj1E.jpg

If your computer is not configured to start from a CD or DVD, check the information that came with your computer. You might need to change your computer's BIOS settings. For information about which settings to change, check your computer manufacturer's website.

3. Choose your language settings, and then click Next.

TNHo4jg.jpg

4. Click Repair your computer.

4lIi67U.jpg

This step only applies if you are using a Windows installation disc.

5. On the System Recovery Options menu, click "Complete PC Backup" or "System Image Recovery", and then follow the instructions.


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#8 RolandJS

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Posted 06 June 2016 - 06:39 PM

FreeBooter, would you make your "Creating a Windows Backup Image" post a separate thread?  I'd like to save it by itself because it is a very thorough post!!


"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#9 FreeBooter

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Posted 06 June 2016 - 06:42 PM

FreeBooter, would you make your "Creating a Windows Backup Image" post a separate thread?  I'd like to save it by itself because it is a very thorough post!!

Thank you yes i can shell i leave this post or remove it and create thread for the tutorial?


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#10 usasma

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Posted 06 June 2016 - 07:00 PM

I'd create a new topic (see the PM I sent you).

I intend to ask the staff to pin this to the top of the Vista, W7, W8, W10, and maybe even the Server forums.


My browser caused a flood of traffic, sio my IP address was banned. Hope to fix it soon. Will get back to posting as soon as Im able.

- John  (my website: http://www.carrona.org/ )**If you need a more detailed explanation, please ask for it. I have the Knack. **  If I haven't replied in 48 hours, please send me a message. My eye problems have recently increased and I'm having difficult reading posts. (23 Nov 2017)FYI - I am completely blind in the right eye and ~30% blind in the left eye.<p>If the eye problems get worse suddenly, I may not be able to respond.If that's the case and help is needed, please PM a staff member for assistance.

#11 FreeBooter

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Posted 06 June 2016 - 07:07 PM

Thank you very much Usasma!

I have created new thread for this tutorial url link is below.

 

 

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/616536/creating-a-windows-backup-image/


Edited by FreeBooter, 06 June 2016 - 07:09 PM.

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#12 Niweg

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Posted 07 June 2016 - 09:45 AM

 Freebooter, that's a nice post, but since most prior versions of Windows backup programs have been right buggy, how do we know Wbadmin is any different?  I can say from 5 years experience that Easeus Todo Backup Free works well for backing up on all these platforms, will do scheduled backups, and you can do selective file & folder restores.  You can create an emergency boot disc to use when you can't boot your system and need to do a restore.  I've also tested Macrium Reflect (free version), have noticed a whole lot of folks using it, and believe it is good as well.


Edited by Niweg, 07 June 2016 - 09:46 AM.

Make regular full system backups or you'll be sorry sooner or later.


#13 RolandJS

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Posted 07 June 2016 - 10:27 AM

Been using Macrium Reflect and Acronis True Image for some time, MR more and more.  To learn more, I've begun dabbling with Image for Windows.  For those using Windows, FreeBooter's very well written tutorial will come in very handy!


"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#14 FreeBooter

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Posted 07 June 2016 - 11:09 AM

 Freebooter, that's a nice post, but since most prior versions of Windows backup programs have been right buggy, how do we know Wbadmin is any different?  I can say from 5 years experience that Easeus Todo Backup Free works well for backing up on all these platforms, will do scheduled backups, and you can do selective file & folder restores.  You can create an emergency boot disc to use when you can't boot your system and need to do a restore.  I've also tested Macrium Reflect (free version), have noticed a whole lot of folks using it, and believe it is good as well.

Buggy in what way i never had any issue with backup and restore of Windows system image backup learning to create image backup of system without any third party tool will come handy as not everyone going to purchase backup software or have the backup software you may have. What you mean by emergency boot disk are you referring to  factory recovery disc or System Repair disk both don't have option to restore Windows Os settings that was modified by user or restore third party applications and users personal files. I always say learning something new is not a waste of time soon or later what you learned come to your aid when you needed most.     


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#15 FreeBooter

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Posted 07 June 2016 - 11:16 AM

Been using Macrium Reflect and Acronis True Image for some time, MR more and more.  To learn more, I've begun dabbling with Image for Windows.  For those using Windows, FreeBooter's very well written tutorial will come in very handy!

Thank you RolandJS i'm sure like me you will one day have to use the Windows image backup utility we should always have more tools in our tools chest this is the reason i learn all i can about Windows OS and its tools.


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