Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

wanting to get linux


  • Please log in to reply
56 replies to this topic

#1 yunion

yunion

  • Members
  • 56 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:11:19 AM

Posted 29 May 2016 - 03:46 AM

im wanting to get linux really after support for windows 7 ends im looking at zorin os to start with but i heard about viruses that can get into the hardware so now im wondering what is some good free security software for linux as well as the best anti rootkit software for linux to be honest my main focus is to protect against and remove viruses that can get into hardware



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 Condobloke

Condobloke

    Outback Aussie @ 54.2101 N, 0.2906 W


  • Members
  • 6,086 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:02:19 AM

Posted 29 May 2016 - 04:57 AM

The vast majority of the stories about hardware viruses are myths.

 

Myth 2: Viruses Can Physically Damage Your Hardware

Sure, a virus like CIH can infect your firmware or BIOS, but the hardware itself is unaffected. Rumors of viruses causing your PC to go crazy and explode are unfounded and a little ridiculous. If your computer ends up infected by one of these more dangerous BIOS-level viruses, you'll probably have to take the computer to somebody that can wipe the BIOS manually, or replace it, but software viruses aren't going to murder your hardware.

 

 

....and there is a never ending line of answers on google which all say basically the same thing

 

https://www.google.com.au/search?q=hardware+virus%27s&gws_rd=cr,ssl&ei=orpKV-CCMobA0gT7hL7YAQ#q=hardware+viruses

 

On a more positive note....I switched to Linux approx 6 weeks ago.

 

I installed Linux Mint 17.3 Rosa , Cinnamon.

 

Very stable, very efficient, quite quick.

 

I am using no Anti Virus, and No rootkit protection at all.

 

The hardware on my PC has had win xp, win 7 and windows 8.1 installed on it at various stages of its life


Condobloke ...Outback Australian  fed up with Windows antics...??....LINUX IS THE ANSWER....I USE LINUX MINT 18.3  EXCLUSIVELY.

“A man travels the world in search of what he needs and returns home to find it."

It has been said that time heals all wounds. I don't agree. The wounds remain. Time - the mind, protecting its sanity - covers them with some scar tissue and the pain lessens, but it is never gone. Rose Kennedy

 GcnI1aH.jpg

 

 


#3 Gary R

Gary R

    MRU Admin


  • Malware Response Team
  • 882 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:05:19 PM

Posted 29 May 2016 - 06:58 AM

Hardware/Firmware (Bios, UEFI etc.) viruses in the wild are about as common as teeth on a hen. In over 10 years working in the forums to help people remove infections from their computers, I've yet to see one.

 

Most descriptions of firmware infections in the media, are "proofs of concept", carried out in a lab under very specific conditions, and the attacker usually needs to have physical access to the machine to infect it.

 

With regard to desktop versions of Linux ........ they simply are not targeted by the malware writing community, so installing anti-virus and anti-malware programs is really unnecessary. All that's really necessary, is to activate the inbuilt firewall that comes with most Linux distros, and to harden your browser against attack.

 

There are a number of reasons that it's unprofitable for a malware writer to write malware for Linux, including but not limited to ....

 

  1. Linux's share of the desktop market is very small, and that of any particular version of Linux is further reduced by the many different distros available.
  2. Most Linux software is downloaded from repositories, which are generally kept free from infection. Provided you keep to this method, there's little chance of you downloading malware.
  3. Linux architecture is generally more resistant to attack than Windows (that is not to say it is unhackable, just that it's harder to do so).
  4. Generally speaking, Linux users are more computer savvy than the average Windows user, since installing Linux requires a certain amount of intent and effort by someone who wants to use it. As a result, they're less likely to just click on things and infect themselves.

Edited by Gary R, 29 May 2016 - 06:59 AM.


#4 yunion

yunion
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 56 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:11:19 AM

Posted 29 May 2016 - 08:03 AM

okay well are there programs to remove viruses from the bios?



#5 Gary R

Gary R

    MRU Admin


  • Malware Response Team
  • 882 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:05:19 PM

Posted 29 May 2016 - 10:24 AM

Have you any reason to believe you've got an infected BIOS, because if you think you have one you're probably wrong.

 

As I said in my previous post, firmware infections are mostly just proofs of concept created in a lab under very specific conditions. Theoretically they can exist, but I've yet to see a real world example of one, and the chances of you coming across one are remote in the extreme.

 

In any case there's no AV or AS program that will protect you against one, since your BIOS loads before your OS, and therefore before your protection programs. The solution if you had one is to re-flash your BIOS, and that procedure is not one that you should attempt unless you have previous experience of doing so, and the necessary tools and skillset to perform it.



#6 MadmanRB

MadmanRB

    Spoon!!!!


  • Members
  • 3,226 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:No time for that when there is evil afoot!
  • Local time:12:19 PM

Posted 29 May 2016 - 11:04 AM

To be honest there is no bullet proof operating system nor bulletproof computer unless you lock it up in the basement somewhere off shore on an island somewhere surrounded by sharks landmines barbed wire 10 foot tall 10 foot wide walls and a small Army of Ninjas disconnected from the internet and in a large safe that can only be opened by you. I could have included molten lava a large Fortress and several other things I think you get the point that there's nothing in this world that is entirely secure. However Linux does have its advantages in many respects over windows but it also has its own security flaws as well you will just have to investigate them a little bit

Edited by MadmanRB, 29 May 2016 - 11:13 AM.

You know you want me baby!

Proud Linux user and dual booter.

Proud Vivaldi user.

 

xu847p-6.png


#7 yunion

yunion
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 56 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:11:19 AM

Posted 29 May 2016 - 12:41 PM

okay



#8 MadmanRB

MadmanRB

    Spoon!!!!


  • Members
  • 3,226 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:No time for that when there is evil afoot!
  • Local time:12:19 PM

Posted 29 May 2016 - 12:51 PM

Well not scaring you off of course, by its nature linux is many times far more secure than windows but I am in the end a realist and know that linux isnt bulletproof.

It still suffers from some issues like browser hijacks and the ultimate security hole in any OS: The end user.

Yup you yourself is kind of the biggest liability in terms of security as is any end user including myself.

However linux is still far more able to be recovered by the end user so it is a bit of a win for yourself and me as well.

Macs are also vulnerable too, you can spend a million dollars on a computer but still be prone to the same issues you may have on windows in the long run.

Its your habits that are to be watched of course, but linux is a big help believe me


You know you want me baby!

Proud Linux user and dual booter.

Proud Vivaldi user.

 

xu847p-6.png


#9 pcpunk

pcpunk

  • Members
  • 6,119 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Florida
  • Local time:12:19 PM

Posted 29 May 2016 - 03:27 PM

im wanting to get linux really after support for windows 7 ends im looking at zorin os to start with but i heard about viruses that can get into the hardware so now im wondering what is some good free security software for linux as well as the best anti rootkit software for linux to be honest my main focus is to protect against and remove viruses that can get into hardware

I've been running linux for about two years now, and no infections but the persistent Browser stuff designed for Windows.  They are easily removed by clearing the cache or using one of the Inbuilt AV tools in linux, clamav.

http://www.clamav.net/about

 

There are also other free tools that come with the OS, or can be downloaded, or just Installed through official repositories for free with no garbage attached.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rkhunter

or

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chkrootkit

Or and, you can install other popular AV's if you like but they are not needed for most.  

 

The best thing is the speed in which it will Boot up and install Updates compared to Windows 7.  I love W7 but it is a pig these days, and I dread the Update thing every two weeks.  Linux Updates come almost Daily, and only take a few seconds to a few minutes to install.


sBCcBvM.png

Created by Mike_Walsh

 

KDE, Ruler of all Distro's

eps2.4_m4ster-s1ave.aes_pcpunk_leavemehere

 


#10 wizardfromoz

wizardfromoz

  • Banned
  • 2,799 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:02:19 AM

Posted 30 May 2016 - 03:16 AM

Hi yunion and :welcome: to BC and to the Linux and Unix section, hope you enjoy your stay here.

I am running Zorin OS 11 64-bit and find it fine.

 

Good luck and enjoy, remember to enable your firewall and you'll be fine.

sudo ufw enable

:wizardball: Wizard



#11 cat1092

cat1092

    Bleeping Cat


  • BC Advisor
  • 7,018 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina, USA
  • Local time:12:19 PM

Posted 30 May 2016 - 04:48 AM

yunion,  :welcome: to the Linux Community of Blleping Computer Forums! :)

 

We're happy to have you here & have chosen our community to be a part of. :)

 

As far a security for Linux goes, as all of the commenters has stated, there's no such thing as a bulletproof OS, unless it's not booted & power cord removed (to prevent network booting). Intel & AMD CPU's has a way to do this, don't know what it's called on AMD, with Intel, it's now vPro, that has been renamed 2-3 times, began in at least the early Vista years, was once called AMT (though went through several revisions. For more, I've supplied a link below. While at the last page for AMD, if interested you can access the entire article. :thumbup2:

 

So if you were to have an OEM computer, even w/out Windows installed, Dell, HP, IBM/Lenovo & others can still deliver firmware updates by using Intel vPro. Believe it's called DASH on AMD CPU's, though an open standard.

 

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/vpro-amt-management-kvm,3003-13.html

 

Have been running Linux Mint for 7 straight years, beginning with Mint 7 or Gloria, and have never been infected. Though am positive have picked up browser objects that could had been passed onto Windows computers on the same network. In other words, just because our OS's typically doesn't become infected, we can be spewing these all over the place. This is how infections spreads, from the network. The OS doesn't matter. 

 

Fortunately, one can clean their browser easily with a number of tools, including the ones with the browser. I use 'Click & Clean' with Google Chrome, and other browser extensions, such as uBlock Origin, Adblock Plus, Avira Browser Safety for active protection, and Bitdefender Traffic Light to warn of Malware loaded sites, this allows me to close the tab safely. Not that any of these will harm my browsing experience or infect my OS, it's just very useful to still use an adblocker, of which ads are fighting for the same bandwidth as the content we desire to view. 

 

The others plays a part in keeping Malware away from the browser, if it doesn't reach it, then we can redistribute across the neighborhood, cable Internet is bad for this, someone across the other side of the city can become infected, and can spread to the other side within a couple of minutes. With Windows, one has to have decent browser & computer security, as well as check the router to optimize settings (good for Linux users also) to stay secure, and it's becomes a chore to run the computer, rather than pleasure, because it's scan, scan & scan more. It's best (daily if used) when running Windows to click onto the C drive & other Windows partitions, and scan each with Malwarebytes once weekly, which even on a fast SSD takes up to an hour. BTW, it's good maintenance to run AdwCleaner once per week on any Windows install, as well as a Custom scan with Emsisoft Emergency Kit, and quarantine anything found. 

 

With Linux, none of this hard, tiring is needed & we can enjoy the OS, rather than be deciding which tool to check the OS with on a given day. It has to be one or the other, or become standing in our 'Am I Infected' line, daily manual scanning is not an option, rather a must. You'd be surprised at what you'll find that your installed security didn't catch. 

 

Good Luck with Linux, I feel that you'll find it plenty enough safe for your needs, w/out working 3 hours out of a 4 hour browsing session performing various scans. :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#12 Mike_Walsh

Mike_Walsh

    Bleepin' 'Puppy' nut..!!


  • Members
  • 1,415 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:King's Lynn, UK
  • Local time:05:19 PM

Posted 30 May 2016 - 05:10 AM

The other posters have the right of it...

 

Linux is not bulletproof (such a thing doesn't exist), but the combination of an inherently more secure system, the fact that very few infections have ever been written for it (because it just isn't profitable enough for the crooks), and the end-user (you) being more savvy than most Windows users to start with (and therefore more likely to be aware of what you are clicking on in the first place), should make it many times more secure for you to use.....and should give you more peace of mind, of course.

 

Do be aware that most AV suites written for Linux are not targeting Linux viruses; they are in use primarily so that the Linux user doesn't pass infected files and such-like onto unsuspecting Windows users.....especially if you're running something like a mail server. Which is not as daft as it sounds; it's the sort of thing that is far more likely to be done with a Linux system than it is using Redmond's famous OS..!

 

I run multiple instances of Puppy Linux, which horrifies most Linux users because it runs as root (the equivalent of a Windows user being Admin all the time).....but after at least 2-2 1/2 years, I haven't had a single thing go wrong with my system; because I'm careful what I do.

 

Bottom line; make sure your firewall is up-and-running correctly.....and watch your browsing habits. The end user is the weakest link, always. No OS can protect you from yourself..!

 

 

Mike.  :wink:


Distros:- Multiple 'Puppies'..... and Anti-X 16.1

My Puppy BLOG ~~~  My Puppy PACKAGES

Compaq Presario SR1916UK; Athlon64 X2 3800+, 3 GB RAM, WD 500GB Caviar 'Blue', 32GB Kingspec PATA SSD, 3 TB Seagate 'Expansion' external HDD, ATI Radeon Xpress 200 graphics, Dell 15.1" pNp monitor (1024 x 768), TP-Link PCI-e USB 3.0 card, Logitech c920 HD Pro webcam, self-powered 7-port USB 2.0 hub

Dell Inspiron 1100; 2.6 GHz 400FSB P4, 1.5 GB RAM, 64GB KingSpec IDE SSD, Intel 'Extreme' graphics, 1 TB Seagate 'Expansion' external HDD, M$ HD-3000 'Lifecam'.

 

KXhaWqy.gifFQ8nrJ3.gif

 

 


#13 Guest_GNULINUX_*

Guest_GNULINUX_*

  • Guests
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 30 May 2016 - 06:14 AM

Bottom line; make sure your firewall is up-and-running correctly.....

 

I hear that all the time here but... why is that necessary (for a home user) since most of us are behind a NAT router?

 

Greets!  :wink:



#14 Mike_Walsh

Mike_Walsh

    Bleepin' 'Puppy' nut..!!


  • Members
  • 1,415 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:King's Lynn, UK

Posted 30 May 2016 - 08:24 AM

Hiya, GNULINUX.

 

Yah, that's very true.....but I've got so used to using one that I tend to recommend it to newbies as a matter of course. And the firewall configuration is an integral part of Puppy's first-run setup routine, anyway; you come into contact with it within seconds of booting up for the first time.....so you might just as well 'set it and forget it'. Job done, after that.

 

Can't hurt to use it; especially if you get it properly configured for the likes of Samba, CUPS, FTP, etc...SSH if you need it, of course, though personally I have no use for that one...

 

 

Mike.  :wink:


Edited by Mike_Walsh, 30 May 2016 - 08:26 AM.

Distros:- Multiple 'Puppies'..... and Anti-X 16.1

My Puppy BLOG ~~~  My Puppy PACKAGES

Compaq Presario SR1916UK; Athlon64 X2 3800+, 3 GB RAM, WD 500GB Caviar 'Blue', 32GB Kingspec PATA SSD, 3 TB Seagate 'Expansion' external HDD, ATI Radeon Xpress 200 graphics, Dell 15.1" pNp monitor (1024 x 768), TP-Link PCI-e USB 3.0 card, Logitech c920 HD Pro webcam, self-powered 7-port USB 2.0 hub

Dell Inspiron 1100; 2.6 GHz 400FSB P4, 1.5 GB RAM, 64GB KingSpec IDE SSD, Intel 'Extreme' graphics, 1 TB Seagate 'Expansion' external HDD, M$ HD-3000 'Lifecam'.

 

KXhaWqy.gifFQ8nrJ3.gif

 

 


#15 yunion

yunion
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 56 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:05:19 PM

Posted 30 May 2016 - 10:00 AM

yes i know linux is not bullet proof that why i was looking for good security software for it






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users