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Want to use RAM stick from dead computer in a new one


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#1 Toshiba2015

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Posted 28 May 2016 - 03:10 PM

My 5 year old Toshiba laptop is now dead.  It had 2GB of RAM in it which is DDR3 and I was hoping I could use it in a new computer I may soon buy.  The new one would be a laptop too, and I see that at the price level I would buy at ($300), it would come with 4GB of RAM which is also DDR3.  However, I've been told that there is something other than whether or not the new computer uses DDR3 or not to consider that I never knew about before.  Apparently, RAM also has a MHZ specification.  The RAM stick I have says it's 1066MHZ.  The RAM spec on a new laptop would be 1600 MHZ.  I've been told that I can use the RAM I have in the new laptop, but it would slow down the RAM that would already be there, although there would still be an overall increase in the computer's performance.

 

Now, would it somehow hurt the newer laptop's RAM by slowing it down like that to the old RAM's level?  What I'm really trying to find out is whether or not it's a good idea to take the RAM stick out of my old laptop and put it in a new one, or if it would be better to not do that.



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#2 SleepyDude

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Posted 28 May 2016 - 03:27 PM

Hi,

 

Without knowing the laptop specifics its difficult to say but there is a big chance that the machine will not work with the 1066MHz memory stick, also the voltage is different.

 

Another thing to take into consideration, some machines use a dual Channel configuration, the 4GB are in 2x2GB, most laptops have only 2 slots for ram, in that case to add more ram you have to remove some...


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#3 Demonslay335

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Posted 28 May 2016 - 03:37 PM

IMO, you wouldn't see much of a difference in going from 4GB to 6GB of RAM, nor would you see a huge difference in the MHz difference of it clocking down to the "slower" stick if you are able to add it.

 

In my experience, I've not had systems really complain much about having different voltage or MHz sticks unless you are trying to overclock (more-so with a custom build desktop), or it's a Mac.

 

If you are planning on getting a lower-end laptop, sometimes they come with x2 2GB sticks as SleepyDude said, so you wouldn't be able to physically add anything. I've even seen some come with only one RAM slot period.

 

As long as you don't void your warranty, and there is a slot open, it may be worth a try still. The warranty will depend on where the RAM is and how accessible it is - if it's just under a panel you can open with a Phillips screwdriver without hassle, you should be fine; if it's underneath the keyboard, or a laptop you have to tear the whole thing apart to get to the RAM, you most definitely would void the warranty, and I wouldn't recommend proceeding since the risk is not worth the return.


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#4 Toshiba2015

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Posted 31 May 2016 - 01:59 PM

IMO, you wouldn't see much of a difference in going from 4GB to 6GB of RAM, nor would you see a huge difference in the MHz difference of it clocking down to the "slower" stick if you are able to add it.

 

In my experience, I've not had systems really complain much about having different voltage or MHz sticks unless you are trying to overclock (more-so with a custom build desktop), or it's a Mac.

 

If you are planning on getting a lower-end laptop, sometimes they come with x2 2GB sticks as SleepyDude said, so you wouldn't be able to physically add anything. I've even seen some come with only one RAM slot period.

 

As long as you don't void your warranty, and there is a slot open, it may be worth a try still. The warranty will depend on where the RAM is and how accessible it is - if it's just under a panel you can open with a Phillips screwdriver without hassle, you should be fine; if it's underneath the keyboard, or a laptop you have to tear the whole thing apart to get to the RAM, you most definitely would void the warranty, and I wouldn't recommend proceeding since the risk is not worth the return.

 

To be specific, I'd probably be getting this one: http://www.bestbuy.com/site/asus-15-6-laptop-intel-core-i3-4gb-memory-1tb-hard-drive-silver/4831500.p?id=bb4831500&skuId=4831500  and it specifies that it comes with 4GB of RAM expandable to 8GB, so it appears I can physically add another stick to it.  But now I'm very concerned about the safety of even doing that.  I originally stated that my laptop just died and that's where I got the RAM stick from.  Well, over the weekend, I killed my desktop by opening it up and inserting my laptop's Wi-fi card into one of it's expansion slots.  The card fit perfectly, but it didn't show up in my network adaptor devices.  So I pulled it back out and then my computer shut itself off and I couldn't turn it back on.  Nothing happened at all when I pressed the power button.  So now I've gone from a laptop and desktop to nothing in the course of a week.  So anyway, I'm reluctant now to buy a brand new computer and start inserting items from older computers into it's slots.



#5 Demonslay335

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Posted 31 May 2016 - 02:35 PM

Wait... you plugged an internal wifi card from the laptop into a slot in the desktop computer? Most laptops have a mini PCI-E card for wireless, and only few motherboards have that on desktops. You should never plug/unplug an internal card while the system is still on; it should be powered off and even unplugged (especially if you are unfamiliar with working on computers).

 

If installed correctly, the RAM would not have an adverse effect on the new laptop; the worst it would do is not show video on powering up, in which case you'd remove the offending stick and it would be fine.

 

For the desktop, I would try a power discharge real quick; you probably tripped a safe-guard or something on the motherboard or power supply. Unplug the system from power, press the power button about 10 times, and on the 10th time, hold it down for 10-15 seconds. Then try plugging it in and powering it up.

 

As for the new Asus laptop, that looks to me like a model you'll have to fully disassemble to access the RAM. Hard telling without seeing if the bottom has an access door.


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#6 Toshiba2015

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Posted 31 May 2016 - 02:44 PM

Wait... you plugged an internal wifi card from the laptop into a slot in the desktop computer? Most laptops have a mini PCI-E card for wireless, and only few motherboards have that on desktops. You should never plug/unplug an internal card while the system is still on; it should be powered off and even unplugged (especially if you are unfamiliar with working on computers).

 

If installed correctly, the RAM would not have an adverse effect on the new laptop; the worst it would do is not show video on powering up, in which case you'd remove the offending stick and it would be fine.

 

For the desktop, I would try a power discharge real quick; you probably tripped a safe-guard or something on the motherboard or power supply. Unplug the system from power, press the power button about 10 times, and on the 10th time, hold it down for 10-15 seconds. Then try plugging it in and powering it up.

 

As for the new Asus laptop, that looks to me like a model you'll have to fully disassemble to access the RAM. Hard telling without seeing if the bottom has an access door.

It's too late for the desktop.  It's now in the scrap heap along with my laptop.  But the Wi-fi card from the laptop did look like a mini one.  There was a slot inside the desktop that I think was labeled "slot 3" and it was the exact same size as the Wi-fi card and it fit perfectly, so I figured it was made for something like that.  No matter now.  It's gone.

 

I assumed the new Asus laptop would have an access door that would be easily accessible to add RAM.  My Toshiba laptop had that.



#7 RolandJS

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Posted 31 May 2016 - 02:52 PM

Before testing your new laptop [when you get it] with the old RAM stick -- check with one of the best hardware/software persons in BC, dc3, go with whatever he says.  He won't steer you wrong.


Edited by RolandJS, 31 May 2016 - 02:57 PM.

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#8 Demonslay335

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Posted 31 May 2016 - 02:52 PM

Not all new ones have access doors. Manufacturers are getting cheaper and cheaper.

 

Sorry about the desktop, it could honestly probably be saved. I'll be the motherboard was fine, worst-case the wireless card took the zapping.

 

If the slot was not laying against the motherboard and looked exactly like the slot in this picture, then it was not mini PCI-E.

 

http://www.gigabyte.us/microsite/348/images/how-to-guide_05.jpg

 

If you plugged it into any kind of slot sticking out perpendicular to the board, then that was not correct.


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#9 Toshiba2015

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Posted 31 May 2016 - 02:54 PM

Not all new ones have access doors. Manufacturers are getting cheaper and cheaper.

 

Sorry about the desktop, it could honestly probably be saved. I'll be the motherboard was fine, worst-case the wireless card took the zapping.

 

If the slot was not laying against the motherboard and looked exactly like the slot in this picture, then it was not mini PCI-E.

 

http://www.gigabyte.us/microsite/348/images/how-to-guide_05.jpg

 

If you plugged it into any kind of slot sticking out perpendicular to the board, then that was not correct.

 

 

It looked like that when it was in the laptop, but the slot I put it into when I put it in the desktop looked more like the slot in the picture behind the screwdriver.



#10 RolandJS

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Posted 31 May 2016 - 02:57 PM

Concerning the desktop, there is one thing you can try:  while being properly grounded the whole time, with the 3-prong plug plugged in AND the big red switch/black toggle switch OFF between "rounds," carefully remove everything externally and internally from the desktop right down to motherboard and powersupply.  Test and see if "anything moves."  If it seems to come to life, put in one stick of RAM at a time, test.  If you get the mobo going, put back into action one piece a time:  monitor, ps/2 or usb keyboard, then mouse, and so on...


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#11 Toshiba2015

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Posted 31 May 2016 - 03:03 PM

Concerning the desktop, there is one thing you can try:  while being properly grounded the whole time, with the 3-prong plug plugged in AND the big red switch/black toggle switch OFF between "rounds," carefully remove everything externally and internally from the desktop right down to motherboard and powersupply.  Test and see if "anything moves."  If it seems to come to life, put in one stick of RAM at a time, test.  If you get the mobo going, put back into action one piece a time:  monitor, ps/2 or usb keyboard, then mouse, and so on...

I appreciate you trying to help, but the computer is already busted up into small pieces for disposal, along with my laptop.  That's how I spent Sunday.


Edited by Toshiba2015, 31 May 2016 - 03:09 PM.





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