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How to increase DEDICATED Video Memory from GPU


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#1 Satavahana

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Posted 24 May 2016 - 08:23 PM

Hey, It's been weeks (literally) since I found any help in finding a forum/tutorial on how to increase the DEDICATED V Ram ( video memory - easier to type ), mine is capped at 2048 mb whereas my total is 10130 mb.  

 

There have been tutorials to go into BIOS and change, but I personally can't because they're BIOS is literally different because I have Visual BIOS and can't seem to find what the told to look for.

 

I have a AMD Radeon R9 200 Series ( Single no SLI ) 

Quad Core Intel i5 4440 CPU @ 3.10 GHz

16 GB Ram

 

I want to increase the dedicated to atleast 4GB so that GTA V and Watch Dogs and other could perform better.

P.S: the extra dedicated will also be used for editing and rendering many video files! 



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#2 FreeBooter

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Posted 24 May 2016 - 11:47 PM

You cannot increase the integrated graphic card Video RAM (VRAM. VRAM is special-purpose memory used by video adapters. VRAM yields better graphics performance but is more expensive than normal RAM. Shared graphics memory refers to a design where the graphics chip does not have its own dedicated memory, and instead shares the main system RAM with the CPU and other components. This design is used with many integrated graphics solutions to reduce the cost and complexity of the motherboard design, as no additional memory chips are required on the board. There is usually some mechanism (via the BIOS or a jumper setting) to select the amount of system memory to use for graphics, which means that the graphics system can be tailored to only use as much RAM as is actually required, leaving the rest free for applications. A side effect of this is that when some RAM is allocated for graphics, it becomes effectively unavailable for anything else, so an example computer with 512 MiB RAM set up with 64MiB graphics RAM will appear to the operating system and user to only have 448 MiB RAM installed. The disadvantage of this design is lower performance because system RAM usually runs slower than dedicated graphics RAM, and there is more contention as the memory bus has to be shared with the rest of the system. It may also cause performance issues with the rest of the system if it is not designed with the fact in mind that some RAM will be 'taken away' by graphics.

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#3 Satavahana

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Posted 25 May 2016 - 10:09 AM

You cannot increase the integrated graphic card Video RAM (VRAM. VRAM is special-purpose memory used by video adapters. VRAM yields better graphics performance but is more expensive than normal RAM. Shared graphics memory refers to a design where the graphics chip does not have its own dedicated memory, and instead shares the main system RAM with the CPU and other components. This design is used with many integrated graphics solutions to reduce the cost and complexity of the motherboard design, as no additional memory chips are required on the board. There is usually some mechanism (via the BIOS or a jumper setting) to select the amount of system memory to use for graphics, which means that the graphics system can be tailored to only use as much RAM as is actually required, leaving the rest free for applications. A side effect of this is that when some RAM is allocated for graphics, it becomes effectively unavailable for anything else, so an example computer with 512 MiB RAM set up with 64MiB graphics RAM will appear to the operating system and user to only have 448 MiB RAM installed. The disadvantage of this design is lower performance because system RAM usually runs slower than dedicated graphics RAM, and there is more contention as the memory bus has to be shared with the rest of the system. It may also cause performance issues with the rest of the system if it is not designed with the fact in mind that some RAM will be 'taken away' by graphics.

Oh, so it's a dead end even with third-party apps + overclocking?



#4 FreeBooter

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Posted 26 May 2016 - 12:55 AM

Yes its a dead end your option is to purchase a new graphic card with required amount of VRAM you need.

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#5 Satavahana

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Posted 26 May 2016 - 04:29 AM

Thanks mate!



#6 FreeBooter

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Posted 26 May 2016 - 05:49 AM

You are very welcome!


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