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Microsoft uses technique to lure you to Windows 10 from the 'X' button


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#1 JohnC_21

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Posted 24 May 2016 - 11:03 AM

MICROSOFT IS so determined to get people to upgrade to Windows 10 that not even ignoring the upgrade window will save you.

report at MSPoweruser explained that the latest trick from GWX.exe, Microsoft's ever-growing wart on Windows 7 and 8, is to change the behaviour of the 'X' button, traditionally meant to signify 'close and do nothing'.

The pop-up messages that we previously reported offered a specific date and time when your system would be updated, but the 'X' button now seems to be short for 'I accept the upgrade'.

In fact, for the first time if you don't want to make the change you have to click a small hyperlink marked 'here'.

 

Article



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#2 RolandJS

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Posted 24 May 2016 - 12:25 PM

rem disabling Windows Update for current session

c:\windows\system32\net stop wuauserv

c:\windows\system32\sc config wuauserv start=disabled

exit

 

I execute the above batchfile as soon as the desktop comes to "parade rest."

Also Gibson's Never10 gizmo gave me the green light recently.

I'm not certain if Spybot's Anti-Beacon is working as planned.


Edited by RolandJS, 24 May 2016 - 12:26 PM.

"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)

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#3 Guest_GNULINUX_*

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Posted 24 May 2016 - 02:21 PM

 

...but the 'X' button now seems to be short for 'I accept the upgrade'.

Article

 

Must be malware if it acts like that, why do AV/AM products don't block this behavior?  :whistle:
 
Greets!



#4 britechguy

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Posted 24 May 2016 - 03:51 PM

 

MICROSOFT IS so determined to get people to upgrade to Windows 10 that not even ignoring the upgrade window will save you.

report at MSPoweruser explained that the latest trick from GWX.exe, Microsoft's ever-growing wart on Windows 7 and 8, is to change the behaviour of the 'X' button, traditionally meant to signify 'close and do nothing'.

The pop-up messages that we previously reported offered a specific date and time when your system would be updated, but the 'X' button now seems to be short for 'I accept the upgrade'.

In fact, for the first time if you don't want to make the change you have to click a small hyperlink marked 'here'.

 

Article

 

 

Sorry, but I wouldn't use anything Chris Merriman wrote as being accurately indicative of anything.  Several of his offerings in the "Updategate" series are just ridiculous and disproven by just a few minutes research.

 

I'm not saying that this mightn't be accurate, either, but I'm big into "consider the source."


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (my website address is in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
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#5 JohnC_21

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Posted 24 May 2016 - 05:02 PM

Also at PCWorld.

 

http://www.pcworld.com/article/3073457/windows/how-microsofts-nasty-new-windows-10-pop-up-tricks-you-into-upgrading.html



#6 britechguy

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Posted 24 May 2016 - 05:28 PM

 

Well I've known about this, and have already stated that I find it loathsome.

 

I find it interesting that this article states, "That means anybody using the default Windows Update setting—as you should be!"  I'd say that there are a lot of people in these parts who, long before Windows 10 was even a thought in someone's head, that would have disagreed vehemently with that attitude.

 

I always did install recommended updates, but I know a lot of people who don't and never have.

 

Long before now I've instructed all my clients who do not wish to upgrade to Windows 10 that they should install either Never10 or GWX Control Panel.  Microsoft really has gone way too far in making Windows 10 "an offer that you can't refuse" and that shouldn't be tolerable.  It's one thing to be pushy, but what they're doing now goes well beyond pushy and into predatory, as far as I'm concerned.

 

I'd be saying something quite different if that line in the dialog box about declining or rescheduling the upgrade were in BIG, BOLD letters, but it's not, it's buried in "the fine print" that it's very easy for an unsophisticated and, often, flustered user to overlook.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (my website address is in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
             ~ Lauren Bacall
              

 


#7 rp88

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Posted 27 May 2016 - 11:09 PM

Post#3

I quite agree, antiviruses should be blocking and halting the execution of the processes from all GWX.exe processes and related processes. I suggest reporting this file to antivirus companies and stating what it does, if enough people decide to call it malware in their personal books and inform antivirus companies of this using the various "report a virus we aren't detecting" features and webpages that antivirus companies have, then the antivirus companies will atleast decide to classify GWX as a PUP and make their products detect any attempt at running it and throw up some sort of

"Example antivirus detected potentially unwanted software running on your system, we have halted it's execution for long enough for you to decide what to do with it. Below are links to information about what this software does, read them then click "allow" to let this software run and "prevent" to block it permanently and quarantine all copies of GWX.exe present on your system."

pop-up.


Post#4
Please note that the article linked to isn't the only one about this behaviour of GWX. It's appeared on loads of news sits now, and plenty of those sites have independently verified that this is going on.


Post#6
"...anybody using the default Windows Update setting-as you should be..."
No, one certainly shouldn't be using the default setting, I think we agree on that. perhaps the article was trying to say "using the default setting as ms encourages you to", but using the default setting is definitely not the best practice in the real world. In the real world the right setting is making sure that no updates are installed without your say-so, therefore either using "check automatically but ask me whether to download" or even using "do nothing automatically" as long as you regularly run a manual check, because installing security updates is still an important thing to do, installing any non-security updates is generally pointless and (in the light of the fact that so many non-security updates are GWX related nowadays) installing non-security updates is pretty risky unless you're very careful about which ones you install.

Edited by rp88, 27 May 2016 - 11:20 PM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#8 FreeBooter

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Posted 27 May 2016 - 11:58 PM

Simple solution to stop Windows 10 upgrade is to uninstall updates that are use to upgrade to Windows 10.

 

 

Uninstall KB3035583 Update for Get Windows 10 App icon

 
The KB3035583 update installs the Get Windows 10 app icon which helps users understand their Windows 10 upgrade options and device readiness.
This update creates Get Windows 10 icon on Notification area and to remove this icon uninstall KB3035583 update and make sure to hide this update as its available for you to install next time you visit Windows Update.
Additionally, Windows 7 users need to uninstall and hide the update KB2952664. Windows 8/8.1 users need to uninstall and hide update KB 2976978. These last two updates are responsible for checking whether or not your system is compatible with Windows 10 but theyre also downloading Windows 10 in the background.


Uninstalling KB3035583 Update
To remove KB3035583, open Control Panel --> Programs and Features ---> View install updates.
rSTcrUy.png
To quickly find KB3035583, you can sort by name. Once youve located it, right-click and choose Uninstall.

When you select to uninstall this update, youll be asked to confirm and then you will need to restart your computer.

If you remove an installed update (or decide not to install a particular update), Windows Update will constantly warn you that there are updates available. The solution to this problem is to hide the update. You can always use the Restore Hidden Updates command (in the left pane of the Windows Update window) if you later decide to restore and install the hidden update.
From Windows Update window click the link indicating that updates are available.
Right-click the update that you would like to hide and click Hide Update. Click OK.
The update is removed from the list of available updates.

 

Note: Get Windows 10 app update may have to be hidden more then once so till Microsoft give up check for new updates each time Get Windows 10 app update is hidden and if there is new Get Windows 10 app update do same.


Edited by FreeBooter, 28 May 2016 - 12:33 AM.


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#9 RolandJS

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Posted 28 May 2016 - 08:12 AM

"...Must be malware if it acts like that, why do AV/AM products don't block this behavior?"

I just now noticed this.  AV programs do not normally search for or destroy malware; unless such is a security suite.

Some, but not all, AV and AM utilities are becoming Swiss Army Knives, promising anything and everything from getting rid of viri, getting rid of malware, getting rid of bloat-ness / slow-ness / registry-ness -- which often, but not always, finally leads to getting rid of the operations smooth-ness of one's Windows.


Edited by RolandJS, 28 May 2016 - 10:27 AM.

"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)

"I heard Spock finally got colander!"  "I believe the word is Kolinahr."  "Oh."


#10 britechguy

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Posted 28 May 2016 - 09:03 AM

Some, but not all, AV and AM utilities are becoming Swiss Army Knives, promising anything and everything . . .

 

And a number of those appear to be coming far worse at their intended job(s).  The day before yesterday I was presented with a laptop that had a security suite by one of the major players in the security software field.  Somehow, that computer had become infected.

 

When I ran Malwarebytes (the free version, yet) it found two rootkits, Agent and Komodia.PUA, and three trojans, Injector VB, FakeAlert, and DNSChanger.

 

The security suite appeared to be up to date and definitions up to date.  I realize that they cannot prevent every possible infection, but a security suite that leaves two rootkits, three trojans, and a bunch of other stuff (255 detections in all) that was classed as malware, not PUPs (of which there were plenty), is not a security suite.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (my website address is in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
             ~ Lauren Bacall
              

 





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