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Need help choosing a new Hard Drive


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#1 kalmly

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Posted 23 May 2016 - 04:27 PM

Event Viewer tells me that the my C Drive has a bad block. So, before things go devastatingly wrong, I need to install a new one.

 

The current drive is a TOSHIBA DT01ACA100 SCSI.  Properties does not tell me much else. Not even its capacity. I only know it's 1TB because it said so on the box the computer was packed in.

 

I do not want a SATA drive, just an old platter. My system is a Win7 desktop.  I don't need 1TB, either. 90% of my computer usage is word processing and data processing. I was planning on looking on Amazon, but I don't know what specifications to use.

 

Must a new drive be the same size, 2.5, 3.5 or whatever?

What do I need to know about my system before choosing a replacement drive?

 

Thanks.


Edited by kalmly, 23 May 2016 - 04:29 PM.


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#2 TheTripleDeuce

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Posted 23 May 2016 - 05:07 PM

what type or model of a computer do you have? we need to verify a new hard drive is compatible with your system, all modern drives are SATA (aside from pci-e SSD drives) drive size can change but typically a 3.5" drive is less expensive than a 2.5" drive

 

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822149382 is the newegg link for your hard drive if youd like to replace it with a exact same model

 

your drive is a SATA 3 based on the 6gbps transfer speed on new egg

 

http://www.newegg.com/Desktop-Internal-Hard-Drives/SubCategory/ID-14?Tid=167523

 

anything in the 6gbps category would be sufficient


Edited by TheTripleDeuce, 23 May 2016 - 05:10 PM.


#3 kalmly

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Posted 23 May 2016 - 05:17 PM

Hi

Thanks for answering.

 

Boy, I'm really confused, aren't I.  I thought SCSI was the old spinning drive, and SATA was the standstill, quick to process, quick to die. No. I do not want to replace the drive that lasted a year with another one.

 

Computer is HP Pavilion, Model 500-267c.



#4 TheTripleDeuce

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Posted 23 May 2016 - 05:19 PM

ide and sata are both platter types drive the new non platter drives are SSD drives that work off of flash memory, your just looking for a sata 6gbps drive wether it be 2.5" or 3.5" is fine preferably 3.5" as mounting would be easier



#5 rqt

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Posted 23 May 2016 - 05:21 PM

Googling the model number you have provided indicates that your drive is a 1TB 7200rpm 3.5" SATA III (6Gb/s) drive.

 

Drives sometimes show up wrongly as SCSI in Device Manager because of the SATA controller driver being used.

 

For easy replacement of an existing drive it is easiest to use one the same physical size as the one you are replacing.

 

So, if the information you have provided is correct, you want a 3.5" SATA hard disk. Capacity, rotational speed & SATA speed are all up to you. (I'd be looking for a 7200 rpm SATA III drive myself, whatever capacity seems like a good deal)

 

The best way to be sure about your current drive is to open up the computer & have a look (or, if you're not happy doing that,  get someone with a little knowledge to do it for you).



#6 Smsec

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Posted 23 May 2016 - 06:02 PM

Online backup provider Backblaze publishes an annual study of their experiences with hard drive reliability. HGST and Toshiba had the lowest failure rates. You might take a look at their report to find which are more reliable.



#7 kalmly

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Posted 23 May 2016 - 06:11 PM

OK. Thanks everybody. You cleared up my confusion, gave me great links, and I know exactly what to look for now. 

 

Really, really appreciate the help.



#8 Fascist Nation

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Posted 23 May 2016 - 06:21 PM

Online backup provider Backblaze publishes an annual study of their experiences with hard drive reliability.....

Thanks didn't know they had released a new report!



#9 JohnC_21

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Posted 23 May 2016 - 06:24 PM

I remember when hard drives were built well. Now they seem to be nothing but junk. I am referring to the platter drives. I have a 160GB drive on an old 12 year old emachines that still runs great.






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