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Distribution Choice [HELP]


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#1 DanieI

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Posted 20 May 2016 - 05:35 PM

Hi! This is sort of urgent, and I really need the right one. I have a stack of DVDs, each one is rewritable. Those DVDs are probably about $1 each, I just got the whole stack on a bargain. I've wasted 3 DVDs, burning different OS. I tried Ubuntu 16.04, Linux Mint 17.1, and then just accidentally burned the wrong ISO that wasn't even linux. Point is, I need to get the right disro this time!

 

My computer is Hewlett-Packard and it has an AMD Catalyst processor, and not Intel. This is very important - take it into consideration before any recommendations. A lot of issues I see with Linux dual-booting across the web are with HP computers - I have an HP Envy 750-045z desktop - Also, AMD GPU stacks don't work very well with Linux - and I have AMD.

 

Basically, I have the worst possible computer for dual booting Linux. It currently has Windows 7 Professional 64-bit SP1 on it.

 

I took a test online, and I got LinuxLiteOS. Then I took it again and got Korora. Still, I want to stick with OS that have large names. Popular distributions are tested more, downloaded more, heard of more on the Internet, and in general better options. Such include Linux Mint and Ubuntu.

 

If possible, I'd like Ubuntu, since the name is wide known, and whenever I look up a dual booting question, the most popular results are on Ubuntu forums. I feel that with Ubuntu I could get a lot more support.

 

If anyone could possibly look into all the versions of Ubuntu and tell me which one would be good for an AMD machine, I'd be extremely happy.

 

I've tried Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, and that didn't work. I clicked "Try Ubuntu" and my monitor shut off, when I first booted from live DVD.

 

If any people would recommend old versions of Linux, I'd be happy to take them for a test drive

Thanks! :)



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#2 MajesticFailure

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Posted 20 May 2016 - 05:56 PM

Everybody loves Debian, so maybe try the 1-disc version (the larger 12+ disc version is for offline users that want the full repository). Get advice from the forum experts first though.

 

Btw, if ur discs are rewritable, then surely you can put other distros on them later? :P



#3 MajesticFailure

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Posted 20 May 2016 - 05:58 PM

(I think l even managed to get Debian on my 500mb RAM 1.2GHz Intel Celeron laptop, so it's good in my opinion. Can't recall which version it was but it was about 3 years ago)



#4 DanieI

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Posted 20 May 2016 - 06:10 PM

I think I'm going to try Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, and then I will consider Debian. Hopefully Ubuntu 14.04 will work! Ubuntu 16.04 screwed up w/ AMD, but hopefully Ubuntu 14.04 will save the day. Wish me luck!



#5 MadmanRB

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Posted 20 May 2016 - 08:53 PM

Personally I would steer clear of debian as its not exactly beginner friendly.

I would actually go for Manjaro, both its KDE and xfce editions are fantastic.

https://manjaro.github.io/

There is this awesome playlist by known linux lover spatry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL426FzyFBwBo_kwxfAwyKCKsviq54SfA0

 

He mainly covers the XFCE edition but the other manjaro offshoots like the KDE are quite good.


Edited by MadmanRB, 20 May 2016 - 08:54 PM.

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#6 MajesticFailure

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Posted 20 May 2016 - 09:14 PM

I think I'm going to try Ubuntu 14.04 LTS ... Wish me luck!

 

Good luck!

 

MadmanRB i used to watch Spatry's vids among others (before i chose my own distro), he's great. I don't get why he's making the Swap partition 2GB though ... I always thought Swap = 1.5 x RAM, and l'm guessing Spatry would be on at least 2GB RAM. Viva Manjaro anyway.



#7 MadmanRB

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Posted 20 May 2016 - 09:32 PM

Swap is more of a personal choice thing really and sometimes the distro does determine the size of the swap based on your ram


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#8 pcpunk

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Posted 20 May 2016 - 10:49 PM

 Point is, I need to get the right disro this time!

 

Basically, I have the worst possible computer for dual booting Linux. It currently has Windows 7 Professional 64-bit SP1 on it.

You already had the right distro's, just be patient and someone will help you with the UEFI Install, that is a great computer.

 

Here is the link where I suggested the two most popular imo and one that your dad wanted you to use:

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/614341/linux-dual-boot-help/#entry4002789

 

Those Disks are re-writable so just re-use them?

 

You might find it a little difficult getting help if you refuse to make a HP Recovery Set.  Nobody here wants you to loose your Windows 7 Pro Install, that would be foolish, I won't bother you about it again.

 

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#9 NickAu

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Posted 21 May 2016 - 02:41 AM

 

You already had the right distro's, just be patient and someone will help you with the UEFI Install,

For UEFI install along side Windows 8 and 10 follow this tutorial, I have tested this method on my laptop and its simple and works.

http://www.everydaylinuxuser.com/2015/11/how-to-install-ubuntu-linux-alongside.html

 

 

You might find it a little difficult getting help if you refuse to make a HP Recovery Set.  Nobody here wants you to loose your Windows 7 Pro Install, that would be foolish, I won't bother you about it again.

 You are giving solid advice there.


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#10 Gary R

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Posted 21 May 2016 - 03:48 AM

Linux Mint should run OK on your computer, my machine is a HP laptop with a AMD A10-5745M processor, and Mint runs fine on it, as does Ubuntu.

 

Personally I prefer to install from a USB drive rather than from a CD/DVD drive, as they tend to be more reliable. Optical drives are prone to misreading data if the laser is even slightly out of calibration.



#11 wizardfromoz

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Posted 21 May 2016 - 04:05 AM

I would go with Ubuntu 15.10 codenamed Wily Werewolf. It has support until July this year, and go with the MATE desktop, not the Unity.

 

Once you have got a feeling for it, many more options are available to you - I have about 18 distros running usually, and can advise from lightweight to heavyweight, Debian-based to RPM-based to Gentoo to Arch - all have merit and some bigger learning curves than others, and all can be used with AMD.

 

That supply of DVDs will come in very handy if you are open-minded and adventurous.

 

I also have Windows 7 Professional 64-bit SP1 on it on an Asus, but it has a recalcitrant Motherboard base set of BIOS I have yet to crack for installing Linux.

 

Good luck

 

:wizardball: Wizard

BTW I "third" the advice of friend punk re recovery solution.



#12 cat1092

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Posted 21 May 2016 - 07:15 AM

 

 

I've tried Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, and that didn't work. I clicked "Try Ubuntu" and my monitor shut off, when I first booted from live DVD.

 

There's a valid reason for this, at the current time. Ubuntu 16.04 LTS isn't supporting AMD graphics. Sounds crazy, because these are still on retail shelves, while they'll support near 10 year old nVidia cards & onboard graphics in MB's, refuses to support current gen AMD graphics. 

 

So for the time being you have a few choices. Linux Mint 17.3 MATE or Cinnamon (my recommendation). Ubuntu 14.04 LTS because the later short term versions will fall to unsupported status. 

 

And like pcpunk stated, please create your recovery media set (DVD-R or +R required), RW cannot be used to create a recovery media set, period. This is because anywhere between 3 & up to 5 DVD's will be needed (normally no more than 4), still it's better to have an extra & not need it than not have it & find out that you do. :)

 

This way, if needed, can reinstall Windows like factory new. Because once you install Linux, there is no more 'F11' key to access Recovery, you're out of luck, so it's better to have these than not. Plus if you have a backup drive, it's best to create an image of the entire drive first. 

 

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Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#13 DanieI

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Posted 21 May 2016 - 09:01 AM

How big will my recovery be though? My hard drive is 621 GB, it came with 913 GB - Can a DVD with 4 GB of storage do the job?



#14 pcpunk

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Posted 21 May 2016 - 10:54 AM

How big will my recovery be though? My hard drive is 621 GB, it came with 913 GB - Can a DVD with 4 GB of storage do the job?

I gave you the link to do this, go back and look at it?  Read it and re-read it, it is going to be the most important and first thing one should do to protect themselves.  When people spend their free time helping try to follow up as best as you can.

 

The Recovery Set will take up about Three Disks, maybe more with Pro.  And like cat said, and it states at the link I gave you, use only DVD-R, Non Re-writable.  You might as well learn the basics now and not loose everything on such a nice computer.  If you start to get into this a little more you will see that a Backup Drive is the best to have.  This way if you make a mistake or get infected all you need to do is reinstall with the Backup Drive Image, and that takes FAR LESS TIME LOL to do than a re-install.  If you have to reinstall windows 7 with all your apps etc. forget about your next weekend, you will be spending it doing this task.

 

The Recovery Set is just a copy of the D:)Drive on you computer, which is the Recovery Partition.  You can also use the Recovery Partition if it is not damaged, to reinstall in some situations, but not as likely when doing this type of operation.  That is more for a standard reinstall to clean things up on your drive after time.  The Recovery Set will get you back to stock, and add all the original Partitions and such if you loose it all or damage it.


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#15 cat1092

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Posted 22 May 2016 - 04:56 AM

 

 

The Recovery Set will get you back to stock, and add all the original Partitions and such if you loose it all or damage it.

 

+1! :thumbup2:

 

Even a larger drive can be installed with the set, but not a smaller one, don't know the 'why' of this. I've upgraded a few HDD's from 320GiB to 500 & 1TiB, and 500GiB to 1TiB. 

 

Yet first, you must move the 'C' partition back the way it was & can do this with the Start Menu or Control Panel, just type in 'Create and format disk partitions', and extend your 'C' drive back over. Get yourself a 5 pack of DVD-R DVD's which are expensive buying that way, I get 100 count sleeves for as low as $12.99 on Newegg & never would consider paying more than $14.99 shipped. That's for TDK media & sometimes Magnavox. The brands doesn't matter, what does is your burner, a bad one will ruin the best of CD/DVD's. 

 

Like pcpunk stated, it's best to have 5 DVD's, just in case, sometimes as few as three are needed, other times 4 or 5. Plus you must allow for one coaster, while unlikely with a good burner, the risk is there, but I've never seen in practice a computer requiring more than 4 DVD's for this task, it's better to have a couple extra than one short. The software creates each DVD, verifies it, ejects & lets you know to place the next in & press Enter when ready. Now take a magic marker and number each DVD so that there's no mixup. Usually the first couple does the formatting of drives, and the last one or two installs the software, the result being a factory installed OS. 

 

Now take that, and if an external is available & image the drive, this way, you can restore a clean OS from backup. When my XPS 8700 arrived, I imaged the drive before being booted for the first time, which is also the same as a newly installed OS. :)

 

It's always best to take precautions before diving into the unknown, or face the real risk of data loss. :thumbup2:

 

We see this all the time. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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