Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Series of problems with my Linux live USBs


  • Please log in to reply
15 replies to this topic

#1 rp88

rp88

  • Members
  • 3,061 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:08:32 AM

Posted 20 May 2016 - 12:31 PM

Ok, something weird just happened, or rather several weird things. I have two linux mint MATE usb sticks, one of them has I think just died and the other, which I've booted from just now is slower than before and has displayed some strange behaviours.

It involves two key "weird things".

The first is a linux USB either not booting or sort of booting but not getting to the proper desktop, the best I can do is describe below, the cursor came up but nothing else and a kind of terminal command showed at one point.

The second is that when I tried to boot a different linux USB (I have two of the things, this one I refer to as the second because it was the second I made, the other was the first lice USB I made) and the "system tray" icons didn't load but instead appeared vertically crushed so they formed a horizontal dashed line only a pixel or so in height up the screen. This USB was VERY slow when this was happening, live USB linux isn't particularly fast but this was much slower than normal for it.

I'll list out what has occured chronologically:

1.I turned on my computer with no USB plugged in and booted windows 8.1 as usual, then as I do when I want to use linux I plugged in the linux USB without logging in, and I restarted from the start screen.
2.Booting began, unetbootin came up in the normal way and I was able to choose to "start linux mint" (the second option down in the list). After this point it took ages to try to load. The little "waiting wheel" cursor came up, then the screen flashed back to unetbootin's interface with several errors listed below, it was too fast for me to read them.
3.Then the screen went black again and the cursor (as in normal pointer shape) appeared but the screen remained black, the desktop didn't load, "ctrl+alt+del" which I have set up to open the linux equivalent of task manager, did nothing.
4.I in the end had to resort to turning the machine off with the power button by holding it down several seconds.
5.I unplugged the laptop, removed the usb, reinserted the usb, plugged the power cable back in and tried starting the machine again.
6.This time it did much the same but went several times between showing the cursor and flashing the error screen, eventually it brought up some message in a box about, and I'm trying to quote from memory here, "the screen server having been restarted many times in the last 90 seconds, this suggests something bad is happening." there was an "ok" option below that which I pressed enter to activate, I don't know whether this message came from linux mint or from unetbootin or from some sort of part of the BIOS of my system producing hardware realated messages. Having hit the enter key it then brought me to a black screen with some sort of mint terminal below saying "mint@mint $" and seemingly waiting for a command. Unsure what to do I had to use the power button to shut the thing down again. Everything so far listed happened very slowly, except the error message flash ups which were too fast to read. The booting and times showing the cursor alone on a black screen and showing the "waiting wheel" cursor were much longer than normal.
7. The next thing I did was try my other linux mint MATE live USB, this one took ages to boot but eventually did so normally. However upon booting the part of the "system tray" where the bluetooth/audio/connection/battery icons live had been crushed vertically into a line of height one pixel. I tried to use the system but it was extremely slow to do anything. I opened firefox and made a google search about "crushed looking system tray icons linux mint". In the end it was so slow I used "task manager" to quit firefox.
8. I therefore shut it down from within mint, turned off the plug, removed the USB, booted to windows 8.1 again. re-inserted the USB but into a different USB port, restarted again and mint booted ok this time with those system tray icons displaying properly. It's also faster now than during those earlier booting attempts, but still slower than normal. When I opened the browser it went straight to the page I had been trying to open when I had shut it down last time.

What on earth happened? Although this could ofcourse be several separate issues which just happened at the same time?
I can't have run out of persistence space on the USb sticks, I've been making sure to keep some free. When last I used the first USB it had about 80MB of free space on it (as it had had for the several times I used it previously). The second USB, the one that booted up with weird looking tray icons but has now booted ok, has a whole 3GB of free space.

I'll try that first one again later but I'm not sure if it will ever work again? could the USB have somehow died? The one I used for that first linux mint USB I made wasn't a very good quality one. Most of the USBs I own are better quality than it, it was just the smallest most disposable one I had in the house when I made my first linux USB stick.

One thing I do remember doing to the first linux USB stick is removing (to get some more space) from linux mint a few of the built in programs which I didn't use:banshee, bluetooth manager,hexchat, one or two of the libreoffice programs,pidgin, tomboy notes, and the transmission download client. All of these were as far as I could tell not system critical, they were programs that just seemed to add features I didn't need. I remember the USB worked fine after I removed them but I can't remember whether I've used it since the day I removed those programs, this might have been the first time I tried booting it since the day I removed those programs, but I have a feeling that it was several weeks ago I took those programs off it and that I've used the stick more than once since then.

I had updated windows recently ,it might have been in the latest set of updates or might have been a while earlier, but I remember seeing that there was one (it was a security update otherwise I wouldn't have installed it) which had something to do with the way windows deals with USB connections, but I can't see how an update to windows should have effects on the booting of linux USB sticks. I'm not sure if I've successfully used the linux mint USB sticks since the latest time I updated windows or if this was the first time I tried using the sticks since I last updated windows. I can boot windows and find the time and date I last updated it but it still won't tell me whether I've used the linux mint sticks since then, I don't remember which day I last used them.

Any thoughts on what may have occured? why the first USB wouldn't boot, I saw the word ext4 in the error message that flashed up but couldn't make out anything else. Why it wouldn't give the desktop the second time I tried it. What might have happened to make the second USB so slow and have dodgy "system tray" icons the first time I tried that?

Thanks

My system: toshiba hardware, using BIOS not UEFI, windows 8.1 as the usual operating system. Intel i3 processor.
The versions of linux I've been using: That First USB had the 32 bit, the second USB I'm using now has the 64 bit, both MATE edition of linux mint 17.3. I've used that first USB stick maybe 20 times to boot linux, this second USb stick I've used maybe 5 times to boot linux.

EDIT: I last updated windows on the 11th for a whole load of updates, then I last booted a linux USB on the 14th. The 15th and 16th I installed flash updates on windows but no other updates, so I can't think windows updates caused this. The only windows updates I've had since I last booted linux mint are a pair to flash player, and those surely can have absolutely no effect on things like BIOS, or how USb connections are handled, or how USbs boot, or drivers or anything like that.

Edited by rp88, 20 May 2016 - 12:44 PM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 pcpunk

pcpunk

  • Members
  • 6,117 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Florida
  • Local time:04:32 AM

Posted 20 May 2016 - 08:00 PM

 

1.I turned on my computer with no USB plugged in and booted windows 8.1 as usual, then as I do when I want to use linux I plugged in the linux USB without logging in, and I restarted from the start screen.

Think I've had problems this way also so I always do a Clean Shutdown.

 

2.Booting began, unetbootin came up in the normal way and I was able to choose to "start linux mint" (the second option down in the list). 

I had some issues with this also, so just let it do it's thing and don't choose anything, default.

 

You might try and Integrity test at this point, easy enough to do.

 

Sometimes you can break these also, they aren't really meant to do full tasks in some situations.

 

 When I opened the browser it went straight to the page I had been trying to open when I had shut it down last time.

Is this with Persistence?

 

I can't have run out of persistence space on the USb sticks,

You should have mentioned this at Top Of Thread.

 

I'm out, that was too much to read lol, jab jab...kidding.  This is something you will have to live with or learn to fix imo because not a lot of folks are using them like this.  Lot's of little things can go wrong with these and they are slow.  Don't you find them to be very slow, maybe it's my pc, but mine were to slow to bother with, I'm impatient lol. 

 

I guess you know how to Boot with "persistent" you did not mention if you were doing that but guessing you are.

 

Have you ever used  PuppyLinux!  This thing will fly on almost any computer and there are editions that are for 64bit that will break speed barriers lol if that is possible.  Good luck, I can try to help but this project did not last long for me because of speed.  You might be better off getting a Fast USB and doing a Full Install to it, I would suggest something Lightweight.


sBCcBvM.png

Created by Mike_Walsh

 

KDE, Ruler of all Distro's

eps2.4_m4ster-s1ave.aes_pcpunk_leavemehere

 


#3 rp88

rp88
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 3,061 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:08:32 AM

Posted 23 May 2016 - 10:41 AM

Post#2, I think the first USB is well and truly broken, I tested it again since I posted the first post here, same error. I did get a chance to write the full error code down though, it is:


[ 229.519050 ] EXT4-fs error (device loop 0):ext4_lookup:1417: inode #258337: comm gsettings: deleted inode referenced:258596

The 0 in (device loop0) might have been two brackets close together() I couldn't tell with the font it was in. Some of the spacings in that error message might not be right but the text is the same.

I have another reason to think that first USB is VERY much dead, it rattled a little when I picked it up, might be part of it's insides are broken or something, would that explain it half booting like it did and giving that error?

The second USB I'm using right now, it's slow, as was the first one, I'm planning to do a linux install to a USB 3.0 external harddrive when I get chance in about three weeks time*, hopefully that will be much faster.

I have 3 USB ports on my computer, the time that the second USb had the weird thing with the icons in the system tray I had plugged it into the right hand close port, the time I used it after that and had the system tray icons clear I had this USb in the left hand far port. This time It's in the right hand close port again and is giving the same weird effect of the system tray icons being crushed flat, wondering if somehow which port it goes in affects this but that would be hard to believe.



Thanks

*really busy with loads of things at present, but have some time free to do it in a few weeks

Edited by rp88, 23 May 2016 - 10:41 AM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#4 Mike_Walsh

Mike_Walsh

    Bleepin' 'Puppy' nut..!!


  • Members
  • 1,415 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:King's Lynn, UK
  • Local time:09:32 AM

Posted 27 May 2016 - 04:25 AM

I'll go along with the suggestion of Puppy Linux; I've been using it for a few years now.

 

Puppy was designed to 'run' from a USB stick. The main system files are in compressed, read-only form; when Puppy boots, because it's typically only 150-200 MB in size (total!), the whole lot is decompressed into RAM, and Puppy does its thing entirely in your machine's memory.....which is a magnitude faster than running from HDD, and many magnitudes faster than running from USB.

 

It also means that you 'boot' with a brand-new copy of the OS every time; all changes are made in RAM during a session, and then only copied back to your save-file/folder at shutdown. This is a special kind of file/folder, containing an entire Linux filesystem inside it, which is where all your settings & config, etc, are stored.

 

The snag with USB sticks is that the flash memory cells have a finite number of read/write cycles before they 'die'. Installing Mint the way you have (I've done it myself before now), the OS still thinks its running from a hard drive, so is constantly reading/writing to the flash memory. I've killed a few 'sticks' doing exactly this.

 

Puppy's method maximises the life span of the stick as far as it possibly can.....and what will help to make it last longer still is leaving around 10% of the stick unformatted. This gives the controller chip room to shuffle used 'blocks' around, prior to deleting them and marking them as ready for re-use.

 

Give it a whirl. Puppy may not be as 'polished' as Mint.....but it's a hell of a lot more fun, and kinder to your stick, too!   :lol:

 

http://puppylinux.org/main/Overview%20and%20Getting%20Started.htm

 

 

Mike.  :wink:


Edited by Mike_Walsh, 27 May 2016 - 05:25 AM.

Distros:- Multiple 'Puppies'..... and Anti-X 16.1

My Puppy BLOG ~~~  My Puppy PACKAGES

Compaq Presario SR1916UK; Athlon64 X2 3800+, 3 GB RAM, WD 500GB Caviar 'Blue', 32GB Kingspec PATA SSD, 3 TB Seagate 'Expansion' external HDD, ATI Radeon Xpress 200 graphics, Dell 15.1" pNp monitor (1024 x 768), TP-Link PCI-e USB 3.0 card, Logitech c920 HD Pro webcam, self-powered 7-port USB 2.0 hub

Dell Inspiron 1100; 2.6 GHz 400FSB P4, 1.5 GB RAM, 64GB KingSpec IDE SSD, Intel 'Extreme' graphics, 1 TB Seagate 'Expansion' external HDD, M$ HD-3000 'Lifecam'.

 

KXhaWqy.gifFQ8nrJ3.gif

 

 


#5 rp88

rp88
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 3,061 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:08:32 AM

Posted 27 May 2016 - 10:47 PM

Post#4
Ok, so puppy linux is specifically designed for running off a stick, but can you install programs and such on it? Or do they get wiped at every reboot?
Can puppy linux install the same programs as mint, because I know I can get certain windows programs to work on linux mint MATE using wine but I don't know if they could work under wine on puppy or other linux distros.

As for mint, when it comes to doing an installation on an external hard-drive, will that be ok or would the constant reads and writes that mint will no doubt want to do from that external harddrive vastly shorten it's lifespan the way a USB would have it's life cut short if exposed to many writes/reads/rewrites...

Thanks

Edited by rp88, 27 May 2016 - 10:47 PM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#6 Al1000

Al1000

  • Global Moderator
  • 7,979 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Scotland
  • Local time:09:32 AM

Posted 28 May 2016 - 09:51 AM

but can you install programs and such on it?


Yes.
 

Can puppy linux install the same programs as mint, because I know I can get certain windows programs to work on linux mint MATE using wine but I don't know if they could work under wine on puppy or other linux distros.


I've never used Wine personally, but have heard of Puppy Linux users using it. Here is some more info:

WINE Runs Windows Software in Puppy Linux

EDIT: I don't recommend downloading any software from the above website as it all seems to be old versions.
 

would the constant reads and writes that mint will no doubt want to do from that external harddrive vastly shorten it's lifespan the way a USB would have it's life cut short if exposed to many writes/reads/rewrites...


No, HDDs do not have finite numbers of writes the way that flash media does.

Edited by Al1000, 28 May 2016 - 09:56 AM.


#7 cat1092

cat1092

    Bleeping Cat


  • BC Advisor
  • 7,018 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina, USA
  • Local time:04:32 AM

Posted 29 May 2016 - 05:06 AM

 

 

As for mint, when it comes to doing an installation on an external hard-drive, will that be ok or would the constant reads and writes that mint will no doubt want to do from that external harddrive vastly shorten it's lifespan the way a USB would have it's life cut short if exposed to many writes/reads/rewrites...

 

As long as it's running within a metal case, I don't see any issues. The reason why I say this, is because plastic cases tens to retain heat, a lot more. So if not metal, I suggest to purchase one, I grabbed another USB 3.0 model today. These can be found for (in USD) beginning at $5.20 for USB 2.0, and either $9-10 for USB 3.0. Am sure there's an EU eBay site that carries much of the same products. 

 

The one I purchased today, USB 3.0.

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/400923091069?_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

 

An older USB 2.0 version used for computers that has only USB 2.0.

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/380885054137?_trksid=p2055119.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

 

Swapping cases on older backup drives is usually no issue when plastic, WD still used the traditional SATA connection. Others like Seagate/Samsung, and others, may have a proprietary connection inside & therefore one of these won't work. But as I said, if they're older, more than 2-3 years, you should be good in swapping cases. These are super easy to use & at the most (if any), only 2 screws are needed, they supply both the screwdriver & screws if needed. 

 

Just wanted to warn you of the dangers of long time running within a plastic case. :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#8 Mike_Walsh

Mike_Walsh

    Bleepin' 'Puppy' nut..!!


  • Members
  • 1,415 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:King's Lynn, UK
  • Local time:09:32 AM

Posted 30 May 2016 - 05:47 AM

Al1000 is quite right.

 

Yes, of course you can install programs and such-like to Puppy, and expect them to still be there when you re-boot. Where would be the point of a system where you couldn't do that?

 

Let me be a bit more specific. When I say it's like running a brand-new system each and every time, that's the OS itself. Any programs you install, any changes or alterations you make within a session, will be saved to the save-file or folder at the end of that session. When Puppy re-boots, it combines the contents of the save-file or folder with that of the 'read-only' system files, and presents them to you, the user, as a coherent whole. This is what's known as a 'frugal' install, because it takes up a lot less space.

 

The reason (as I understand it) for Puppy running like this is because Puppy was specifically designed to keep very old hardware still useful.....and such machines often have limited amounts of storage, or use USB drives and all sorts of things for additional storage, plugged into all kinds of different ports/connectors. Puppy will allow you to store bits'n'pieces all over the place, and combine everything into a single, usable system. So will most other Linux distros, except that they're not specifically designed to do this in quite the same way that Puppy does.

 

It's perfectly possible to install Puppy as a normal, 'full' install to HDD.....but this is not the preferred option of most users, as it's a sight more awkward to fix when it goes wrong. As long as you have a copy of your /mnt/home partition, and a backup of your save-file, you can restore Puppy within 5-10 minutes, by the use of a simple copy/paste operation. Delete the contents of your partiton, copy from your backup, and paste into the now empty partition. Now do the same with your back-up file or folder. Re-run the Grub4DOS bootloader config tool that comes with every Pup as standard, re-boot, and you're away again. It's THAT simple.....and that quick. No need for special 'cloning' software and hours of messing around, like with most other OSes.

 

And yes, we have a couple of forum members who regularly re-package the latest releases of WINE into Puppy's special .pet & SFS formats. I believe the most recent on offer is currently 1.9.10:-

 

http://www.murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?p=905239#905239

 

I use version 1.7.51 myself, and use it to run Photoshop CS2 in Puppy, along with a few other graphics apps that I've been using for years. I've even written a tutorial for installing CS2 under WINE.

 

 

Mike.  :wink:


Edited by Mike_Walsh, 30 May 2016 - 05:55 AM.

Distros:- Multiple 'Puppies'..... and Anti-X 16.1

My Puppy BLOG ~~~  My Puppy PACKAGES

Compaq Presario SR1916UK; Athlon64 X2 3800+, 3 GB RAM, WD 500GB Caviar 'Blue', 32GB Kingspec PATA SSD, 3 TB Seagate 'Expansion' external HDD, ATI Radeon Xpress 200 graphics, Dell 15.1" pNp monitor (1024 x 768), TP-Link PCI-e USB 3.0 card, Logitech c920 HD Pro webcam, self-powered 7-port USB 2.0 hub

Dell Inspiron 1100; 2.6 GHz 400FSB P4, 1.5 GB RAM, 64GB KingSpec IDE SSD, Intel 'Extreme' graphics, 1 TB Seagate 'Expansion' external HDD, M$ HD-3000 'Lifecam'.

 

KXhaWqy.gifFQ8nrJ3.gif

 

 


#9 rp88

rp88
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 3,061 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:08:32 AM

Posted 30 May 2016 - 06:13 AM

Post #7
Thanks for the warning, and I'll bear it in mind for any future HDDs I buy, but the one I have right now is a USB 3.0 connectable (no SATA connection or anything, just a special wire with a funny shaped connector on one end for the drive and a USB 3.0 on the other end) thing, built into it's plastic case. It doesn't look to be the sort of thing that can be opened to get an ordinary drive out from inside, it's a plastic box built around the drive. But damn those are good deals on the prices of hard-drives you mention there, I ought to have a look around and see if I can buy an internal harddrive of the same type I already have, then maybe I could swap out my drive with windows on it, plug in another internal drive, install linux on that and be able to choose between windows or linux based on which drive is in the machine at the time.
Thanks


Post #8
I know there can be some systems where things you do are gone after reboot, and they can probably be helpful to people just wanting to take a look at the system and have a play around with it to see if they like it, they could also be useful for doing online banking and things from a system you know to be safe.

Unetbootin says it can only make persistent media for ubuntu based operating systems, does this mean I must use another maqthod to make puppy linux live USB sticks? Or can one download an iso of puppy linux, use unetbootin to put it on USB, then boot it and find it acting in the persistent manner you describe, like linux mint already does for me?

What are the special .pet and SFS formats? Can puppy not run .deb (these seem to be the linux equivalent of .exe on windows) files?

Edited by rp88, 30 May 2016 - 06:13 AM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#10 Mike_Walsh

Mike_Walsh

    Bleepin' 'Puppy' nut..!!


  • Members
  • 1,415 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:King's Lynn, UK
  • Local time:09:32 AM

Posted 30 May 2016 - 08:46 AM

Hallo again, rp88.

 

Puppy can indeed install via UNetbootin:-

 

http://www.murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?t=99826

 

.....though in Puppy's case it's so much easier to download the ISO, burn to disc (best done, if in Windows, using a small utility called 'Burn CDCC' from TeraByte Unlimited):-

 

https://www.terabyteunlimited.com/downloads-free-software.htm

 

Very simple, since it does one thing, and one only; it burns an ISO image to an optical disc. That's all it does, so you can't really go wrong. You don't even need to install it; just d/l it, and run the exe. file contained within. Or, if you're in a Linux distro, there's a multiplicity of disc-burning tools usually available.....any one of which will do what you want. XFBurn is fairly well thought of.

 

Then, run your newly-created LiveCD, and look in Menu>System>Puppy Universal Installer, and just follow the instructions. Puppy has no end of 'wizards' to help new users through the process, and it only takes around 5 mins or so. Then, shut your Live session down. Boot from your newly-created 'Puppy on a stick'.....set up the initial first use settings.....then shut-down again, straight away. The very first thing Puppy asks is if you want to create a save-file or folder, and save the session to it. Say 'Yes', and, again, just follow the instructions. The 'save-file/folder' is Puppy's equivalent of the UNetbootin 'persistence'.

 

You should now have a completely self-contained lightweight Linux OS on a stick.....and the entire process shouldn't take more than half-an-hour, tops.

 

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

As to your other questions; yes, the majority of Puppy releases within the last few years will run .deb files, with varying different degrees of success. Puppy, right from its inception nearly 13 years ago, has always been built using the T2 or 'WoofCE' build processes; it typically uses either Ubuntu or Slackware code-base packages, and turns them into a 'Pup' at the end of the process. It's the only Linux distro capable of building itself with code-packages from widely varying different OSes.

 

A .pet is short for 'Puppy Enhanced Tarball'; a 'tarball' being the Linux equivalent of the Windows zip or RAR packages (though usually with somewhat higher levels of compression.)

 

An SFS package is constructed using the 'Squash File System'.....though with these, you can load and/or unload them while Puppy is running, without losing the contents of the SFS package itself. They don't even have to be on the same partition as Puppy, though it's generally recommended to place them in the /mnt/home partition while they're actually in use. It's another way of keeping Puppy as lean and compact as possible.....and able to run on really old hardware.

 

This might help you to understand how Puppy's unique method of operation actually works.....though it is a bit 'technical'!

 

 

Mike.  :wink:


Edited by Mike_Walsh, 30 May 2016 - 09:18 AM.

Distros:- Multiple 'Puppies'..... and Anti-X 16.1

My Puppy BLOG ~~~  My Puppy PACKAGES

Compaq Presario SR1916UK; Athlon64 X2 3800+, 3 GB RAM, WD 500GB Caviar 'Blue', 32GB Kingspec PATA SSD, 3 TB Seagate 'Expansion' external HDD, ATI Radeon Xpress 200 graphics, Dell 15.1" pNp monitor (1024 x 768), TP-Link PCI-e USB 3.0 card, Logitech c920 HD Pro webcam, self-powered 7-port USB 2.0 hub

Dell Inspiron 1100; 2.6 GHz 400FSB P4, 1.5 GB RAM, 64GB KingSpec IDE SSD, Intel 'Extreme' graphics, 1 TB Seagate 'Expansion' external HDD, M$ HD-3000 'Lifecam'.

 

KXhaWqy.gifFQ8nrJ3.gif

 

 


#11 Al1000

Al1000

  • Global Moderator
  • 7,979 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Scotland
  • Local time:09:32 AM

Posted 30 May 2016 - 09:17 AM

these seem to be the linux equivalent of .exe on windows


Any file can be made to be executable in Linux.

#12 NickAu

NickAu

    Bleepin' Fish Doctor


  • Moderator
  • 13,574 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:127.0.0.1 Australia
  • Local time:07:32 PM

Posted 30 May 2016 - 05:04 PM

 

ISO, burn to disc (best done, if in Windows, using a small utility called 'Burn CDCC' from TeraByte Unlimited):-

On machines with Windows 7 and up there is no need for 3rd party software to burn an ISO.

 

How to burn ISO image using Windows Burn Disk Image.
 
Notice:  This applies only to Windows 7 and Windows 8, earlier versions do not have this.
 
1.  Place a blank CD or DVD in the tray of your optical drive and close the tray.
 
2.  After you have downloaded the ISO image you want to burn right click on the Start orb, then choose Windows Explorer.
 
3.  When Explorer opens click on Downloads in the left pane.  Scroll down till you find the ISO file you want and double click on it.  Click on Burn Disk Image.
 
4.  In the image below you will see Disk burner:, this should be set to the optical drive you want to use.  Click on Verify disc after burning if you want to Windows to verity the disc image after burn.  Click on burn.
 
 5.  In the image below you can see that the green progress bar, when the image is finished burning the bar will be filled.
 
 6.  After the image has completed being burned click on Close.



#13 cat1092

cat1092

    Bleeping Cat


  • BC Advisor
  • 7,018 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina, USA
  • Local time:04:32 AM

Posted 31 May 2016 - 03:18 AM

Nick is right, on Windows 7 or above, there's no need for 3rd party disc burning software (free or paid) for the burning of CD/DVD ISO's alone. :thumbup2:

 

Follow the above instructions, all will be good. 

 

Though some disk burning suites may have other useful utilities, and this will often be the software on OEM computers that creates recovery media sets (usually CyberLink). They have a bundled media suite that may be beneficial to those w/out a Media Center option (W8 & above), however that's no issue for Linux users, we have more than one option for this, though watching DVD, even on Blu-Ray media, is quickly becoming a pastime with Netflix/Hulu Plus, there's some workarounds to install on Linux, though beware of any that involves WINE. Some of these 'tutorials' may' come back to bite one in the backside. :P

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#14 rp88

rp88
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 3,061 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:08:32 AM

Posted 03 June 2016 - 12:14 PM

Ok, so to check if I've understood. From within windows 8.1 or linux mint I can download an iso file for puppy linux and burn it to disc. Then I boot the puppy cd/dvd disc and plug in a USB, then I install puppy to the USB. Set up initial settings (like what: turning on the firewall with sudo ufw enable ? preparing browser settings? installing programs?), then reboot. After that it stores it's persistence in this clever way* which makes it faster to run that other forms of live linux and also helps the USb drive last longer because it is written too less often.

I assume that while using the wizards to make the live on a the USB stick version I'll have to be very careful about specifying the USB drive and not accidentally telling it to install to the internal HDD.

Post #13, what are those risks you discuss with WINE tutorials? I've been using wine a bit to run some windows programs (from copies I keep of installer exe files, so I know these files are trustworthy exe file programs) under linux. As for DVD discs, I use VLC on windows and have found it to work just as well under linux.


* Stored in the RAM during sessions then the USB is updated at the end of the session so when I boot the next time it first boots in the initial state then applies any changes that had been stored, such that it boots up in a way which makes it behave like persistence.

Edited by rp88, 03 June 2016 - 12:19 PM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#15 Mike_Walsh

Mike_Walsh

    Bleepin' 'Puppy' nut..!!


  • Members
  • 1,415 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:King's Lynn, UK
  • Local time:09:32 AM

Posted 03 June 2016 - 01:33 PM

@rp88:-

 

Yup; that's a pretty good summary. Although you don't enable the firewall like you do in the 'buntus & related distros; for a start, Puppy's version of Bash doesn't recognise 'sudo'.....and for another, Puppy uses a custom-built firewall GUI front-end (still based on iptables); it's not ufw! The older version of Puppy's firewall is a wee bit more hands-on, although it gives you finer control; the new version is just a series of tick-boxes.

 

You can start setting things up and installing stuff before the first shut-down, but it's easiest to perform that initial shutdown straight away.....the save-file or folder only has to be created once, so you might as well get it out of the way first as last.

 

The main difference between the save-file and save-folder is this; the save-file is a fixed size, and contains a full Linux filesystem inside it. (Which is why you can install it to a FAT32-formatted partition.) When you start to run out of room, there's a utility to allow you to increase the size of it. This is the original method that Barry Kauler, Puppy's inventor, came up with.

 

The save-folder, on the other hand (like any folder), will automatically grow to the size of the partition Puppy is installed to.

 

-------------------------------------------------

 

@Cat:-

 

The only reason we recommend 'Burn CDCC' to Linux newbies on the Puppy Forums is because it does one thing, and one thing only.....it burns an ISO image to a CD/DVD. Many people are used to using burner software for recording music, video or data, but as you yourself must know, an ISO image has to be burnt in a specific way to produce a bootable LiveCD... Just copying it to disc will produce a list of files.....but isolinux will not work the way it was intended to.

 

 

Mike.  :wink:


Edited by Mike_Walsh, 03 June 2016 - 01:35 PM.

Distros:- Multiple 'Puppies'..... and Anti-X 16.1

My Puppy BLOG ~~~  My Puppy PACKAGES

Compaq Presario SR1916UK; Athlon64 X2 3800+, 3 GB RAM, WD 500GB Caviar 'Blue', 32GB Kingspec PATA SSD, 3 TB Seagate 'Expansion' external HDD, ATI Radeon Xpress 200 graphics, Dell 15.1" pNp monitor (1024 x 768), TP-Link PCI-e USB 3.0 card, Logitech c920 HD Pro webcam, self-powered 7-port USB 2.0 hub

Dell Inspiron 1100; 2.6 GHz 400FSB P4, 1.5 GB RAM, 64GB KingSpec IDE SSD, Intel 'Extreme' graphics, 1 TB Seagate 'Expansion' external HDD, M$ HD-3000 'Lifecam'.

 

KXhaWqy.gifFQ8nrJ3.gif

 

 





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users