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Get rid of Standby/Available RAM!


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#1 Shawnv

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Posted 17 May 2016 - 02:03 PM

I have joined this forum in the hopes of finding an answer to a question I have had for years, but cannot seem to find a real answer on the internet anywhere. Though specifically an issue on a Windows Operating system, this pertains to all Windows operating systems, so I felt this was more appropriate here since it is specific to RAM. My question is:

 

A. Is there any method or program to move the "Available" (a.k.a. "Standby") Memory to "Free"?

 

B. If not, is there a method or program that can help prevent Windows from allocating memory to "Available"/"Standby"?

 

My office and I use a memory hogging drafting/modeling program called Revit. Revit will slow down or even freeze during certain tasks (such as upgrading a project) when the "Free" memory runs out, even if I have 10 GB of "Available" RAM. This is likely because Revit (and not just Revit, most other programs as well) search for "Free" memory before falling back on "Available"/"Standby" memory, if they fall back on it at all. This program, as well as the Windows OS itself, have a tendency of not releasing memory to "Free", but rather sending it to "Available"/"Standby" for future use, which is not helpful at all since there is absolutely no need for 10GB of "standby" memory. Restarting the program only releases 4GB to free, if I'm lucky, as this accumulation of "Standby" memory simply grows the longer the computer has been on. Even just on reboot, Windows 7 throws a whopping 4GB in "Standby"! I am not interested in run-of-the-mill "Memory Cleaner" programs, as these do not differentiate between Available and Free, and simply move, at most, 10MB from cached to Free; hardly a speck in 16GB of RAM. I am not concerned with Cached memory, or total memory, or kernel memory, or any memory other than the Free and Standby/Available.

 

Even if you just know of a program that provide a warning when "Free" memory runs low or a desktop or system tray widget that can gauge TRUE "Free" memory (not "Unused" Free+Standby memory), it would be helpful for the users in my office, since they are not Tech-Savvy enough to use the Task Manager / Resource Monitor. Please let me know of anything that can even remotely help with this issue, I appreciate any help I can get.

 

How do I stop Window's greedy hoarding of Memory in the "Standby" purgatory?

 

Attached File  Memory Use.PNG   32.29KB   1 downloads

 

Sincerely,

 

Tired of rebooting several times a day,

 

Shawn van Boven



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#2 Willy22

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Posted 17 May 2016 - 03:13 PM

- There's a program that can kill the "Standby" part of the memory (for Vista & newer):

https://wj32.org/wp/software/empty-standby-list/

http://www.guidingtech.com/57546/free-up-ram-windows-command-line/

 

Put the command in a *.bat file and let it run by Task Scheduler (with admin rights)

 

WARNING: Try it out before you put it to use on your office computers !!!!!!!!!! Some programs have lousy memory management and then more problems could arise.

 

- Programs use, as time goes by, more & more ("In Use") memory. Install PcWinTech's Cleanmem. It reduces memory usage of the "in Use" part of the memory every 15 minutes (this can be changed) and can kill the file cache as well (I have seen file caches using > 1GB) and is run by Task Scheduler. Very reliable program.

 

There also could be issues with the hard drive. Over time Windows pushes, bit by bit data from "Standby" to the pagefile.

- Did you tell Windows to have a fixed size for the pagefile ? If so, then tell Windows to let it manage the size of it.

- Regularly run the build-in disk fragmentation program. Then all fragmented files will be defragmented and put more closely together.

- How much room is left on your harddisks and is that memory scattered around the drive ? The process of enlarging the pagefile "slows down" one's computer. And if all the free space on you harddisk is scattered around the entire drive it will take even MORE time to enlarge the pagefile.


Edited by Willy22, 17 May 2016 - 03:15 PM.


#3 Shawnv

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Posted 17 May 2016 - 05:09 PM

Thanks for the reply, Willy! The program worked perfectly! This did dump a significant amount of cache memory to "Free" instead of "Standby", in addition to clearing the "Standby". I even tried using the GUI version of these commands, RAMMap, which seemed to do the same thing successfully.

 

I couldn't figure out how to get it to work within a *.bat file - it would run and close immediately without any effect, even with a pause and having the file in the root path. I have no experience with .bat files, so I am clueless as to how to get this to work. Running the *.exe directly from Task Scheduler seemed to work fine, is there anything wrong with doing like this instead of in a .bat file (please excuse my ignorance of .bat files)?

 

I had already tried CleanMem, but it does not touch Standby memory. I tried it again and explored all settings, but alas, it only marginally cleans up cache (unless I am doing something wrong?). The program looks like a great idea with its useful 15 minute checks, but it produces very little results.

 

I am not very knowledgeable on pagefile. I have not changed any settings, so it is still set to automatic. It says that 16 GB is currently allocated, equivalent to my RAM size, does this sound normal? See attached image.

 

Attached File  Pagefile Settings.PNG   37.73KB   0 downloads

 

Thank you very much, Willy, for this solution to the Standby memory! I wish there was a more "GUI-Friendly" version to automate the commands instead of the Task Scheduler, but at least there is a solution!


Edited by hamluis, 28 December 2017 - 11:22 AM.


#4 Willy22

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Posted 17 May 2016 - 06:00 PM

- You can disable the Superfetch Service. Superfetch manages a large part of the systemcache.(="Standby").

- It's a trade off. In my experience. killing "Standby" does slow my system down. It then needs to access the HD more.

 

- A better weblink for a "Standby" killer:

http://forum.sysinternals.com/rammap-empty-standby-list_topic27297.html

This can be run using Task Scheduler.

 

- How large is you HD ? How much free space have you on your HD ? And what is the fragmentation of that HD ? (See with e.g. Piriform's Defraggler). Ís the pagefile fragmented ? Do you have a SSD ?

 

 

Cleanmem pushes data form "In use" to "Standby" & "Modified". And then Windows should be writing data to the pagefile (on disk) to relief the memory. And I think the transfer of data to the pagefile is the bottleneck. That's why a well organized HD is important.

 

- I still would leave Cleanmem installed. It keeps the file cache under control.

- Perhaps your HD is in the 1st stages of failing. Run GSmartcontrol and tell me how much red(-ish)/pink lines (except for "Temperature") show up in the "Attributes" tab.

http://gsmartcontrol.sourceforge.net/home/



#5 Shawnv

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Posted 17 May 2016 - 06:33 PM

Thanks again, Willy. See my responses to your questions below:

 

  1. From what I've read, disabling superfetch is a bad idea. I don't need to kill all of the standby, just rid the excess bloat periodically or slow its accumulation - I've seen over 13 GB sitting in standby!
  2. RAMMap worked quite well, but it can't be run with task manager since it doesn't execute the "Empty Standby List" on startup. The included emptystandbylist.exe is the same as the one you sent me earlier, and so far seems to be running fine with task manager.
  3. HD is 452 GB with only 116 GB left, and yes, I am long overdue for defrag and cleanup. An SSD would speed things up, but alas, our company won't pay for it.
  4. I can keep Cleanmem on as long as it doesn't start pigging out on memory itself. I just didn't see any major improvement with it, is all.
  5. I have attached the part of the results of GSmartcontrol below. Didn't see any lines, new tests passed fine, all say old age and never failed, only 5 said pre-failure. The computer is only 2 years old. This problem with Free memory is an issue for almost all our computers in our office, since the program we use, Revit, uses tons of memory and has many memory leaks, and has a voracious appetite for Free memory. Mine is actually not too bad, since I have 16 GB of ram, whereas others only have 8GB.

Attached File  hd report.PNG   8.32KB   0 downloads



#6 Willy22

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Posted 18 May 2016 - 01:01 AM

- Seems your HD is indeed OK. But what says the program for the other HDs ?

- Run Piriform's Defraggler. What's the % of fragmentation ? Is the pagefile fragmented ? Defraggler can defragment a number of system files (e.g. pagefile) upon start up as well. I personally let Defraggler list only the fragmented files and I only let the program defragment those files.

- As far as I know it's like this: Superfetch keeps track of what files you're regularly using/loading and pre-loads those files in the "Standby" with low priority while you're using your computer. Based on that I would assume that disabling Superfetch would dramatically slow down the growth of Standby. But e.g. Cleanmem does push data to "Standby". If it doesn't work then enable Superfetch again. A matter of trial & error.

- Here's another "trick" to "tame" Standby. Regularly do the following with CCleaner:

   1. Clean the list of "recent files"

   2. Then completely empty the "C:\Windows\Prefetch" folder.

- Do you have the build-in defragmentation program run say every week or is that disabled ?

- After "cleaning up" your HD, set the minimum size for the pagefile to a big number say 16 GB and make sure it isn't fragmented.

 

All these small things put together could make your system run better.

 

Computers are complicated things, right ?

 

Keep me posted.


Edited by Willy22, 18 May 2016 - 02:11 AM.


#7 Willy22

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Posted 18 May 2016 - 10:51 AM

- I hope you don't run Chrome or Firefox as well. These are memory hogs as well.

- The big question is: Will Revit crash when you kill the "Standby" memory ?



#8 cymroly

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Posted 18 May 2016 - 11:27 AM

I suggest Memory Cleaner 2.0, set it to start with windows and run every 5 minutes: http://www.koshyjohn.com/software/memclean/

 

I use it manually, up to 1-3 times per day.

 

For browsing, Pale Moon (x86), lower memory usage than Firefox (way less than Chrome), excellent stability: http://www.palemoon.org/



#9 hanksterr7

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Posted 27 December 2017 - 11:45 PM

To find out what is consuming modified memory, show the "handles" column in task manager | processes column. Find the process using a gazillion handles and kill it and or disable its service






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