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Seagate hard drive question


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12 replies to this topic

#1 MadmanRB

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Posted 12 May 2016 - 09:24 PM

Okay so tomorrow I am going out for a small trip to best buy to buy a microsd card for my new tablet and I may be buying a new Western digital hard drive... but should I?

I have a seasate barracuda 1TB drive 

The thing is that I know seagate has a record for failures after two or so years of operation, here is its age according to speccy:

Power On Time 859.1 days

 

Yeah had it for more than two years and I am understandably nervous, plus it is the hard drive that hosts my windows 10.

I dont want to act too early as the hard drive is acting as it should and my smart data checks out.

But are there warning signs I should look for? indicators that failure is imminent?

I would like to know


Edited by MadmanRB, 12 May 2016 - 09:28 PM.

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#2 Condobloke

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Posted 12 May 2016 - 09:39 PM

I have a seagate 300gb in my current setup, which has been in continual use since 2006


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#3 bludgard

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Posted 12 May 2016 - 09:52 PM

Predicting the demise of an electronic/mechanical device would be an effort in disappointment and/or futility. A brand new drive could fail out of box and an acquired used one could give many years of stable use.

If the data is useful or dear... may be a good time to have a couple of stable (running) clones and/or images on other drives: Ready to "re-load" the machine in case of fatal error. Appears one is preparing for a backup regimen: I would encourage this above all in this digital era.



#4 rqt

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Posted 13 May 2016 - 02:36 AM

Many people, such as myself, have always had good luck with Seagate drives, & most just go on & on & on.

 

Many people, such as myself, have not had much success with other makes of drive, including Hitachi & Western Digital - although after very many years of refusing to buy any Western Digital drives because of premature (just over 12 months) failures on multiple Western Digital Filecards I do now have one or two Western Digital drives & they seem OK so far.............

 

BUT many other people have had the opposite experience with their drives.

 

It has been said that there are two type of hard drives - those that have already failed & those that are going to. Even new drives can fail. The only way to avoid data loss due to drive failure is to have an up to date back up - & for convenience that should include a full system image so that your entire system can be restored very quickly after drive replacement. You could always put a spare drive into stock (although it could fail while you're storing it)



#5 hamluis

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Posted 13 May 2016 - 03:05 PM

The reality...for several years now...is that there are only 3 manufacturers of hard drives.

 

IMO...to assume that one is better or worse than the others...sort of belies the fact that there have previously been a "multitude" of hard drive makers and these 3 are left after the dust has settled.

 

I've never seen a claim by either manufacturer...that their drives are "better" than those manufactured by the other two.

 

I've used/employed drives from each manufacturer, with little cause for complaint.

 

As previously pointed out...any hard drive is subject to fail, at any time, any place, any situation.  Such is the price of using electro-mechanical techniques in a device, IMO.

 

Louis


Edited by hamluis, 15 May 2016 - 04:23 PM.


#6 Niweg

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Posted 13 May 2016 - 07:44 PM

 The best indication of impending hard drive failure is the SMART data.  I know you can download diagnostics from Seagate that will show that, and if I remember, there's a way to show it with Windows 10 software, but I don't remember how to get to it.  I had a 1 TB Seagate hard drive to go out in my 2.5 year old Dell Desktop about a year ago FWIW.  The best thing you should do in addition to looking at the SMART data is to make regular full system backups to an external hard drive.

 

 Good luck.

 

 Edit: I just read up on tools for SMART data in Wikipedia and found that Speccy will report it.  You can download Speccy from Bleeping Computer right here.


Edited by Niweg, 13 May 2016 - 07:57 PM.

Make regular full system backups or you'll be sorry sooner or later.


#7 DavisMcCarn

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Posted 15 May 2016 - 09:12 AM

OK guys, and this is for all of you.......

At this point, no hard disk drive manufacturer actually manufactures all of the pieces.  One company makes the platters, another the spindle motor, yet another the read/write head assemblies, and so forth with several other companies making the various parts which are then assembled by Seagate, Western Digital, Hitachi, Toshiba, etc.

If there becomes a known problem with a large number of the finished products, it is usually the fault of one of those assemblies rather than the entire model line and can be as specific as the production line which manufactured it.

Examples:

(This is a rare exception to what I have said, so far) In the 2007-2009 time frame, one line for Seagate's 7200.11 series used a defective firmware version at one facility which left faulty data in the "system area" (where the SMART info is saved).  When the drive detected a new problem, it corrupted the system area because of the faulty data and the drive suddenly became "not ready" or had a capacity of zero megabytes.  Seagate actually offered free data recovery for this problem and I probably "fixed' about a hundred of them using a specialized serial port to tell the drive to rewrite that data followed by a firmware update.

Maxtor played with "fluid dynamic bearings" in the early 21st century which, when the drive was banged, would cause the platters to wobble like a top.  SMART then thought all kinds of stuff was screwing up and it, too, would corrupt the SMART data because the flying height of the heads was wrong.

The infamous Hitachi/IBM Deathstars of the late 1990's failed because some idiot decided that the place to park the heads when the drive was idle was directly over the system area which was a really bad idea.

 

Post 2010; though, the common thread is a failure of one of the third party assemblies.  Substandard head assemblies which then write flakey data, faults in the spindle motors or its driver chip, or platters that "don't quite cut it" are far more common than a bad design.

 

Ironically, now, the most common cause of a drive's failure is an excessive shock, especially in laptops!  Nobody seems to know that a rotating hard drive is seven times more fragile than a raw egg and even the slightest bump will damage the drive with the worst case being the shock wasn't enough to cause instant death; but, rather sneaks up on the owner during the following weeks or months.

Yes, pay very close attention to the SMART data with the key values being Reallocted Sector Count, Pending Sectors, and G-Shock events.  If you catch it early enough, a sector clone of the failing drive to a replacement works 90+% of the time.


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#8 Fascist Nation

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Posted 16 May 2016 - 12:51 PM

Consumer HDDs with one exception ALL suck.  There is a reason they all now offer 2 year warranties, and Seagate would be 1 yr except WDs failure to drop down to 1 yr forced them to pop back up.  SUCK!  And this is for a device that holds your presumably precious data.

 

So fine.  The solution is making sure you back up as frequently as you are unwilling to lose.

 

I only recommend WD Black and enterprise drives.  At least they still have 5 and 7 year warranties; except for the faux enterprise drives that have been coming out of late.  Toshiba with its 3 yr warranty was the last consumer drive I pointed to and those days are gone.  Some of the 2.5" drives still have 3 yr warranties but I have noticed they are dropping to 2 lately.   SUCK!

 

SSDs are pretty reliable.  HDD makers see the writing on the wall I suspect as SSD RAM prices fall.



#9 MadmanRB

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Posted 23 May 2016 - 07:08 AM

Well how about this one, I am looking for more space as I am running out of room on my windows drive anyhow:

 

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9SIA5AD3H22332


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#10 DavisMcCarn

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Posted 23 May 2016 - 07:19 AM

That's a nice drive at a pretty good price!


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#11 MadmanRB

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Posted 23 May 2016 - 07:20 AM

Yeah i will get more opinions first and wait until next week to buy it


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#12 devilus

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Posted 23 May 2016 - 07:43 AM

I would go with Samsung, just because they are more reliable for me. I've used two Seagate HDD's, one on my XP and another one on my Vista system. Beginning from the first day, there were a lot of reallocated sectors, created every few days. Now I run two Samsung HDD's without any reallocated sectors on them. HDD diagnostic tools report still 100% health for both.

 

I didn't try out the WD ones.


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#13 hamluis

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Posted 23 May 2016 - 11:45 AM

Samsung/Seagate...same commercial entity.

 

Louis






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