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help with windows 10


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#1 Dalton2

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Posted 10 May 2016 - 04:49 PM

Hi,

 

I am doing upgrade to windows 10.

 

I am not sure which option I should choose:

 

1.Keep Personal files

 

2.Apps Keep personal files only

 

3.Nothing

 

 

Does nothing will also remove my partition?

 

If I choose nothing will it remove my partitions?

 

Which one should I choose? How is it affect my drivers will windows force me to update generic drivers?

I also back-up my drivers.

 

I just want to make my laptop fast like before it was slow and now it's okay i don't know how to explain

 

 

I think I should upgrade and then getting the windows 10 key and then do clean install, what do you think?

 

And should I worry about microsoft collects data on me, wifi password, etc?

 

Should I use TRON?

 

Please let me know what you think?

 

 

or should I downgrade to windows 7? will it work with my win 8.1 key?

 

 

what i doing is listening music, using browsers, windbg sometimes and IDE(Visual Studio)..

 

thanks.

 

Please answer me.

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#2 britechguy

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Posted 10 May 2016 - 05:24 PM

I have never seen the split you show for numbers 1 & 2.

 

This is my general advice regarding upgrading to Windows 10, regardless of whether upgrading from Windows 7 or Windows 8:

 

1. Take a full backup of all your data and a system image before you do anything else.

 

2. Use the Upgrade option, whether via the reserved copy process (GWX, where you have the small Windows 10 icon in your system tray and the reminder messages popping up) or via the "Upgrade Now" button on the Windows 10 Media Creation Tool webpage.  I always keep the apps and files for this step.

 

3. See how your computer behaves after the upgrade process (if it succeeds, and it typically does).  Some upgrades go perfectly smoothly and the machine is as good as it was or much better in terms of its behavior.  In other cases, while the upgrade succeeds, you can experience some less than perfect behaviors afterward.  This is not uncommon, particularly for upgrades from "well-used" Windows 7 systems that are laggy, sluggish, or otherwise behaving badly.

 

4. If you have "bad behavior," use the "Reset this PC" option under the Update & Security Settings, Recovery Pane.  This forces the entire Windows 10 operating system to be reloaded from scratch.  I generally use the "Keep my files" option first and only resort to letting it wipe everything if a "Keep my files" reset doesn't calm things down.

 

5. If all of the above does not work, they try burning install media, whether to optical media or bootable USB, using the Media Creation Tool page and doing a full install, from scratch, using that media.

 

I see no point in doing the "wipe everything and start from scratch" upgrade as the first choice because it's often not necessary.  My technique is definitely more work if your system isn't happy after the upgrade keeping files and applications, but it's a lot of work to reinstall applications and your data files if you wipe them out as part of the upgrade.

 

There is no "right way," it's about what you're comfortable with and thinking clearly about what work is or might be necessary based upon the path you choose to take.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#3 Dalton2

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Posted 10 May 2016 - 05:49 PM

I have never seen the split you show for numbers 1 & 2.

 

This is my general advice regarding upgrading to Windows 10, regardless of whether upgrading from Windows 7 or Windows 8:

 

1. Take a full backup of all your data and a system image before you do anything else.

 

2. Use the Upgrade option, whether via the reserved copy process (GWX, where you have the small Windows 10 icon in your system tray and the reminder messages popping up) or via the "Upgrade Now" button on the Windows 10 Media Creation Tool webpage.  I always keep the apps and files for this step.

 

3. See how your computer behaves after the upgrade process (if it succeeds, and it typically does).  Some upgrades go perfectly smoothly and the machine is as good as it was or much better in terms of its behavior.  In other cases, while the upgrade succeeds, you can experience some less than perfect behaviors afterward.  This is not uncommon, particularly for upgrades from "well-used" Windows 7 systems that are laggy, sluggish, or otherwise behaving badly.

 

4. If you have "bad behavior," use the "Reset this PC" option under the Update & Security Settings, Recovery Pane.  This forces the entire Windows 10 operating system to be reloaded from scratch.  I generally use the "Keep my files" option first and only resort to letting it wipe everything if a "Keep my files" reset doesn't calm things down.

 

5. If all of the above does not work, they try burning install media, whether to optical media or bootable USB, using the Media Creation Tool page and doing a full install, from scratch, using that media.

 

I see no point in doing the "wipe everything and start from scratch" upgrade as the first choice because it's often not necessary.  My technique is definitely more work if your system isn't happy after the upgrade keeping files and applications, but it's a lot of work to reinstall applications and your data files if you wipe them out as part of the upgrade.

 

There is no "right way," it's about what you're comfortable with and thinking clearly about what work is or might be necessary based upon the path you choose to take.

Hi. I did little research and this is what I am going to do:

 

1. let windows 10 setup install over night for (2.)

2. grab windows key for license

3. create bootable windows 10 usb

? - Question is does I choose windows 10 version because I don't know?( I have windows 8.1)

4. I will backup OEM recovery partition and I will burn it to CD verbatim. -> and then I will do clean install just remove all partitions.

? - how to burn the recovery to disk so I will able to use disk as bootable afterwards? and after I able I don't need onekeyrecovery program right?

5. I recovered drivers but how do I install drivers. I used two methods: 1. using software to backup and 2. using powershell script I found in the web

How to install then the drivers?

6. can you refer me link when I accomplish all so I can disable windows 10 drivers update?

 

Thanks I hope it will be good because this is what I am planing.

 

what I then going to do is: (links for me)

https://fix10.isleaked.com/

install drivers

http://techaeris.com/2015/08/14/configure-windows-10-privacy-settings/

http://www.howtogeek.com/223864/how-to-uninstall-and-block-updates-and-drivers-on-windows-10/#

 

What is your opinion about backing up recovery partition and then remove it?

 

 

Thanks. 



#4 Dalton2

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Posted 11 May 2016 - 01:49 AM

Hi,

 

I finished to upgrade to windows 10. I am creating usb windows 10 for doing clean install. I decide not to remove the partitions.

Do I need to use a key for windows 10? If so, while I'm in windows 10 how do I get the key?

 

Other question, how do I prevent from windows to update drivers and so I can select to recover driver? Because the drivers I need is touchpad or I can get it from Lenovo website.

 

Thanks! and I hope to get to windows 10 quickly as possible.



#5 rqt

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Posted 11 May 2016 - 03:41 AM

If you have activated Windows 10 once on your computer the Windows activation system now has a recorded hardware fingerprint for your machine and Windows 10 will activate automatically when you do a clean install.

 

When clean installing Windows will ask for a key early in the process, but offer you the option the say that you don't have a key - along with an instruction to use this no key option if you have previously installed Windows 10 on your machine. The only catch here is to ensure that you are installing the same version (Home or Professional) of Windows 10 that you previously installed - otherwise it will not activate & will not give you any clue as to why.

 

The activation hardware fingerprint should allow you to change any components except the motherboard (I have tried it changing CPU & HDD simultaneously, & the Windows 10 clean reinstall activated automatically with no problem).


Edited by rqt, 11 May 2016 - 03:42 AM.





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