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Is it wrong if I want to learn how to hack to prevent an attack?


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#1 sheen25

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Posted 05 May 2016 - 04:43 PM

Is it wrong if I want to learn how to hack to prevent an attack? I'd like to learn ethical hacking to prevent one.



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#2 Didier Stevens

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Posted 05 May 2016 - 05:24 PM

Learning to hack is not wrong. I'm a hacker.


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#3 sheen25

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Posted 05 May 2016 - 06:14 PM

Okay. Can you recommend sites? I really want to understand how this works.


Edited by sheen25, 05 May 2016 - 06:14 PM.


#4 imdeepster

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Posted 05 May 2016 - 11:37 PM

Learning to hack is not wrong, but how you apply your knowledge is where.

 

The first few steps would be to learn a few programming and web programming languages and then learn how to use linux environmen.



#5 Didier Stevens

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Posted 06 May 2016 - 04:39 AM

What are your current skills?


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#6 Phabeon

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Posted 06 May 2016 - 01:27 PM

Learning to hack is not wrong, but how you apply your knowledge is where.

 

The first few steps would be to learn a few programming and web programming languages and then learn how to use linux environmen.

 

Is learning SQL(microsofts" version one of those? 

 

i.e. if one is headed in the penetration testing or the whitehat route is SQL something that would be useful or even applied? 



#7 quietman7

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Posted 07 May 2016 - 05:07 AM

Learning to think like a hacker to prevent attacks!
Learning Hacking to Stop Hackers
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#8 sheen25

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Posted 07 May 2016 - 06:27 AM

I am a total beginner when it comes to computer programming. 



#9 sheen25

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Posted 07 May 2016 - 07:22 AM

Thank you for this! I'll be studying these coding and computer programming.



#10 johnmeehan

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Posted 07 May 2016 - 10:05 AM

I recently installed Kali Linux and it appears that is designed for hackers.  Not exactly sure what all the preloaded programs do so I will have to do some research (I know Google IXquick is our friend).

 

My intital reaction to that particular distro was that is some scary stuff.

 

I did look into tryng to find passwords for nearby wireless systems (WPA2) and it appears fairly easy just takes time.

 

Aside from avoiding paying an internet service provider by using someone else's wireless what point is there to actually hacking into a wireless router?



#11 Agouti

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Posted 07 May 2016 - 10:24 AM

I did look into tryng to find passwords for nearby wireless systems (WPA2) and it appears fairly easy just takes time.

 

Aside from avoiding paying an internet service provider by using someone else's wireless what point is there to actually hacking into a wireless router?

I don't see how that fits into what the OP asked about...

I'd like to learn ethical hacking to prevent one.



#12 BaronCardinal

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Posted 07 May 2016 - 10:25 AM

Kali is a great tool for penetration testing. As a point, knowingly/unknowingly accessing a system you don't own can have consequences for the user/hacker and the victim, including jail time.



#13 Didier Stevens

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Posted 07 May 2016 - 01:40 PM

If you want to start to learn computer programming, I recommend: http://www.openbookproject.net/thinkcs/python/english2e/

For Metasploit, take a look at: https://www.offensive-security.com/metasploit-unleashed/

And here's a good book by Georgia that is an intro to penetration testing: https://www.nostarch.com/pentesting


Didier Stevens
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#14 sheen25

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Posted 07 May 2016 - 01:44 PM

What are your current skills?

Total beginner. What specific programming and web programming should I learn?



#15 Didier Stevens

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Posted 07 May 2016 - 02:08 PM

See my post (#13).


Didier Stevens
http://blog.DidierStevens.com
http://DidierStevensLabs.com

SANS ISC Senior Handler
Microsoft MVP 2011-2016 Consumer Security, Windows Insider MVP 2016-2019
MVP_Horizontal_BlueOnly.png

 

If you send me messages, per Bleeping Computer's Forum policy, I will not engage in a conversation, but try to answer your question in the relevant forum post. If you don't want this, don't send me messages.

 

Stevens' law: "As an online security discussion grows longer, the probability of a reference to BadUSB approaches 1.0"





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