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Net Framework: 1.1 Or 2


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#1 Orange Blossom

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Posted 05 August 2006 - 11:50 PM

When I visited Microsoft Windows Update, this time I chose Custom and saw that they had Net Framework 2 available. I have Net Framework 1.1. Is it worth upgrading to 2? What are the pro's and con's?

Note: If I decide to go with the upgrade, I wouldn't until AFTER my computer problems are taken care of. Don't want to confuse things.

Orange Blossom :thumbsup:

p.s. I hope I have this in the right forum.

Edited by Orange Blossom, 05 August 2006 - 11:51 PM.

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#2 Orange Blossom

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Posted 11 August 2006 - 12:09 AM

Is this topic in the wrong forum? I'm not sure if the Net Framework is considered hardware or software. It sounds pretty rigid to me :thumbsup: .

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#3 Mr Alpha

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Posted 11 August 2006 - 04:33 AM

Yes, it is the wrong forum. The .NET Framework has nothing to do with hardware. You need it to run .NET programs. It is a combination of a bunch of pre-coded libraries and a javaish run-time enviroment.

The Microsoft .NET Framework is a component of the Microsoft Windows operating system. It provides a large body of pre-coded solutions to common program requirements, and manages the execution of programs written specifically for the framework. The .NET Framework is a key Microsoft offering, and is intended to be used by most new applications created for the Windows platform.

The pre-coded solutions form the framework's class library and cover a large range of programming needs in areas including the user interface, data access, cryptography, numeric algorithms, and network communications. The functions of the class library are used by programmers who combine them with their own code to produce applications.

Programs written for the .NET Framework execute in a software environment that manages the program's runtime requirements. This runtime environment, which is also a part of the .NET Framework, is known as the Common Language Runtime (CLR). The CLR provides the appearance of an application virtual machine, so that programmers need not consider the capabilities of the specific CPU that will execute the program. The CLR also provides other important services such as security guarantees, memory management, and exception handling.

The class library and the CLR together comprise the .NET Framework. The framework is intended to make it easier to develop computer applications and to reduce the vulnerability of applications and computers to security threats. First released in 2002, it is included with Windows Server 2003 and Windows Vista, and can be installed on most older versions. The current version is 2.0, which was released in November 2005 in conjunction with Visual Studio 2005.


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#4 rowal5555

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Posted 11 August 2006 - 05:15 AM

Hi Orange Blossom.

I may be completely wrong here, and if so I guess someone will tell me.. It appears to me that .NET v1.1 and v2 are separate entities and that v2 is not just an upgrade. According to my Control Panel, I have v1.1 installed with a hotfix, and also v2.

As I understand it, these are used for building websites etc which I don't do so can't comment from personal experience.

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#5 Orange Blossom

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Posted 11 August 2006 - 07:54 AM

Yes, it is the wrong forum. The .NET Framework has nothing to do with hardware.


Sorry about that. :thumbsup: I saw the word "framework" and thought it had something to do with the drivers or something of the computer framework. Sigh. Live and learn. Thanks for straightening me out. :flowers:

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#6 Enthusiast

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Posted 11 August 2006 - 08:27 AM

How to troubleshoot Netframework installation issues
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/824643/en-...&sid=global

This is what you need although you can have both 1.1 and 2.
2 is a redistributable for system builders.

Edited by Enthusiast, 11 August 2006 - 08:29 AM.


#7 HitSquad

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Posted 11 August 2006 - 08:37 AM

Hi Orange Blossom
To be a little more clear on what the .NET Framework means to the end user, (you and I) it is required to run applications developed using Microsoft's .NET Framework programming tools. If a software author uses .NET Framework to write a program, then you will need it in order to install and use the program. Typically you find out when attempt you run the program and an error message appears (i.e "This program requires .NET Framework", "1645 Error Installing Microsoft .NET Framework> Return Code followed by four numbers, etc). You may even get the famous 'Setup Failure - unknown reason" thing. If you have the older version installed and recieve a .NET Framework error attempting to install or run a particular app , then you most likely need the newer version. Until then, there's really no reason other then "just because". :thumbsup:

#8 Orange Blossom

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Posted 11 August 2006 - 10:46 AM

Ah, Thank you Hit Squad. :thumbsup: That makes things much clearer. In my case, unless I get one of those error messages you mentioned, I don't need Net Framework 2.

Thanks so much,

Orange Blossom :flowers:
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#9 rowal5555

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Posted 14 August 2006 - 12:26 AM

One small thing to be aware of Orange Blossom. After I installed .NET Framework 2, I came across a new user account named ASP.NET which had installed itself as a limited account user. Now that really had me scratching my head for a while until the good folks here sorted me out.

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#10 Orange Blossom

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Posted 14 August 2006 - 01:13 AM

Huh, I've never had and still don't have Net Framework 2 on my beastie, but I have a service with the following name: aspnet_state which is described, among other things, as providing support for ASP.NET, and it logs on as Network services. And Belarc Advisor says that ASPNET is one of my local system - as opposed to user - accounts that has never been used.

(ASP.NET: Gosh that name conjures up a picture of a net full of snakes: and a state [aspnet_state] full of them :thumbsup: ? Get me out of there!)

Can you provide a link to the topic where you figured out that local user account business with the ASP.NET? I'd like to find out more about it, (though I'm not sure if I want snakes using my computer, no matter how friendly :flowers: ).

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#11 rowal5555

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Posted 14 August 2006 - 01:25 AM

Ah, Orange Blossom. You must be an interesting person to live with, LOL.

M$ spiel on .NET Framework is HERE. I guess they know a lot more about it than I ever will.

Cheers

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#12 Orange Blossom

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Posted 14 August 2006 - 02:28 AM

Thanks for the link rowal5555, :thumbsup: I'll look into it. I hope it's not too technical.

Orange Blossom :flowers:

Ah, Orange Blossom. You must be an interesting person to live with.


We-e-e-e-l-l-l-l ... maybe ... sometimes. :trumpet:
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