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#1 ScathEnfys

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Posted 26 April 2016 - 06:50 PM

I'm very interested in the Cyber Security field (heck it's half the reason why I joined our MRTP here), and am looking to find what certifications I should grab after picking up my Cyber Security Bachelors from college. I'm interested in network security, pentesting, and most other related positions. Any particular programs I should look at?
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#2 Smsec

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Posted 26 April 2016 - 09:05 PM

Global Knowledge, an IT training provider, publishes an annual report on Top-Paying Certifications.  Some of those require experience but the list is a good place to start exploring cert options. If you're looking for an entry level cert, the Security+ is relatively easy to pass with some self study and given your Cyber Security studies. The Darril Gibson Secturity+ study guide is a good one and is highly rated on Amazon.

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#3 ScathEnfys

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Posted 27 April 2016 - 06:14 PM

Thanks @Smsec. I'll keep those resources in mind.
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#4 DeimosChaos

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Posted 25 May 2016 - 09:54 AM

You won't need much more studying to pass the Sec+ exam after college (especially if you have a dedicated course on the actual Sec+ book, I did at Drexel). I took it almost 2 years after graduating and passed. My company did pay for the week long "boot camp" but honestly I didn't learn anything new, it did refresh some stuff though.

 

As far as certs go, the big one is the CISSP. I plan on getting this one myself at some point.

 

Once you graduate, try to get into a Security Engineer I type position. I just got into this after a year and a half out of my last job (right after school). A couple years in that type of position should help you gain a good amount of experience in security things.

 

If you want to get into more pentesting related things look at the CEH (Certified Ethical Hacker) cert. I hear it isn't all that difficult either, might do this one myself as well.


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#5 Kilroy

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Posted 28 May 2016 - 01:34 PM

If you're into podcasts take a listen to TWit Tv's Security Now! podcast.  The series is archived in both audio and text on GRC.com.

 

One thing that a lot of security people don't understand is that personal security is much easier than organizational security.  Mostly due to the fact that the easier it is to use the less secure it is.  Couple that with the fact that you have people who don't understand why you can or cannot do thing has security ramifications and you end up with people working around the approved solutions.






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