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Help? Ethernet Network Shortcut?


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#1 Jason2341

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Posted 22 April 2016 - 07:00 PM

I am extremely new to how Ethernet works and pretty much clueless about network setups.

So I want to setup an ethernet network in my new house which I've discovered to have CAT5e cable in every room's wall with telephone jacks. Each cable just runs to the boiler room in the basement where it's just sitting there, not connected to anything. We don't use a landline.

I want to convert each/most telephone jacks to an ethernet jack connect them to a networking switch in the basement, which then connects to a router in the living room. However I'd rather not drill a hole between floors.

Here lies my question, Can I use the ethernet jack that is right next to the router to go into the uplink port of the switch, which then connects to each bedroom's ethernet jack? Will this work?



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#2 ScathEnfys

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Posted 22 April 2016 - 07:46 PM

Can I use the ethernet jack that is right next to the router to go into the uplink port of the switch, which then connects to each bedroom's ethernet jack? Will this work?

Short answer: yes, probably.

Long answer: Routers have two 'sides': the Local Network and the WAN / Internet. All routers have one WAN port (often labeled 'uplink' or similar), and 99% have at least one LAN port. You seem to be describing a situation where you connect a router to a switch, and the switch is then connected to all the cat5 in the walls. This would work. I will note that one cannot simply tie the wires from cat5 to a telephone jack and call it done, though, as phone jacks and Ethernet jacks are of different sizes.
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#3 Jason2341

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Posted 22 April 2016 - 08:34 PM

This would work. I will note that one cannot simply tie the wires from cat5 to a telephone jack and call it done, though, as phone jacks and Ethernet jacks are of different sizes.

 

 

Thank you so much! I am aware of that, and I have bought CAT5e jacks and replaced the telephone jacks with them. 



#4 ScathEnfys

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Posted 22 April 2016 - 10:58 PM

Just make sure to crimp the cables as Patch Cables, not crossover.
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#5 Kilroy

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Posted 23 April 2016 - 10:38 AM

You want a CAT5E Patch Panel in the basement.  You will terminate all of the free runs to the patch panel and then run short patch cables from the patch panel to the switch.

 

The equipment in the room with the router will connect to the router and one of the router ports will connect to the wall down to the switch.  Then all of the connections to the switch will be connected to the router.  You can add additional switches in the rooms if you need more ports, like your media room may need ports for a Bluray player, Smart TV, Game Console(s), and so on. 


Edited by Kilroy, 23 April 2016 - 10:38 AM.


#6 Wand3r3r

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Posted 24 April 2016 - 10:48 AM

telephone wiring is wired in series whereas network cabling is home runned to a patch panel.

This means lets say you have three outlets in a room.  That is three separate cables going to the boiler room.  If this is the case you are fine.  If not you just went to a lot of work for nothing.  You can't network in series.



#7 ScathEnfys

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Posted 24 April 2016 - 11:06 AM

@Wand3r3r seeing as it says "Each cable" in the OP, I would assume that this is real network wiring... added to that the fact that OP mentioned CAT5e cables which to my knowledge are not used for telephone wiring, I would assume they know a ethernet wiring setup from a telephone wiring setup.
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#8 Wand3r3r

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Posted 25 April 2016 - 09:44 AM

Cat5e is the standard for running phone lines and have been for at least 10 years in Oregon and California that I am aware for new construction.  Doesn't makes sense cost wise or utility wise to put in cat3 anymore.

Here is a link from 2006

http://www.mavromatic.com/2006/06/how-to-using-a-cat5e-jack-rj-45-for-use-with-a-telephone-connector-rj-11/

 

There are folks that also used cat5e for both telephone and 100mb lan using the same cable.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Hack-your-House-Run-both-ethernet-and-phone-over-/






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