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Window 7 dual boot


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#1 Rolando8

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Posted 22 April 2016 - 03:09 PM

I use Window 7 as my operating system and installed Linux on a second hard drive.

 

In order to use either Window 7 or Linux I have to go into the BIOS and make changes,from which

hard disk to boot.

 

Is there a method which would allow me to use Windows 7 or Linux.I hope

that this option would pop up when starting my computer.

 

Any idea how to do this >

 

Thank you

 

Ronaldo8

 

NB: I am a newbie and would appreciate simple but precise instructions.


Edited by hamluis, 22 April 2016 - 03:17 PM.
Moved from Win 7 to Linux - Hamluis.


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#2 DeimosChaos

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Posted 22 April 2016 - 09:40 PM

When you installed Linux it should have installed grub for you. Which typically finds other OSes you might have installed and puts them in a list for you to choose at startup. What Linux distro are you running?

 

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#3 NickAu

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Posted 22 April 2016 - 10:22 PM

Hi :welcome: to Bleeping Computer.
 

In order to use either Window 7 or Linux I have to go into the BIOS and make changes,from which
hard disk to boot.

 
What I would try first is to set the PC to boot from the Linux disk in BIOS and leave it set like that,  then boot into Linux ( Its most likely a Buntu based one ) Open terminal and type this

sudo update-grub

This will add windows to the boot list on your Linux drive and you should get a choice of operating system to boot from.
 
Image not my work
238800d1351428205-dual-boot-windows-7-li
 
Edit to add image.


Edited by NickAu, 22 April 2016 - 10:56 PM.


#4 cat1092

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Posted 23 April 2016 - 01:34 AM

Rolando8,  :welcome: to the Linux Community of Bleeping Computer Forums! :)

 

While the instructions by my colleague Nick is correct, if you wish to avoid a 'double boot', then look at installing EasyBCD 2.3 in your Windows 7 OS. Though we can't provide that assistance in this section, those in the Windows 7 one can, it's the tool I use on most all of my computers, a couple would be a total mess in booting my OS's (on one, causing a triple boot cycle that even on a fast SSD, nearly two minutes lost in gaining access to a couple of OS's). This allows for one to choose a default OS at boot, though you can choose others from the drop down list, as well as move these up or down the list and there will be no double boots. Email address required only for download, you won't have to check your mail for a link, it'll download after inputting your email & clicking 'Download'. 

 

https://neosmart.net/EasyBCD/

 

If this looks attractive to you, head over to the Windows 7 section & you'll get assistance in installing/configuring, which is easy. We can only provide detailed instruction on Linux software here. Am only showing it because it's an option that can save a lot of time, if running a SSD, running the Grub bootloader, there goes my 10-15 second boot times. :P

 

Yet we hope that you'll return here for your Linux issues, you'll have access to lot of assistance in running your choice of Linux OS, and if a newbie, will need some. 

 

Good Luck, either way you go with the bootloader. :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#5 Rolando8

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Posted 23 April 2016 - 06:19 AM

When you installed Linux it should have installed grub for you. Which typically finds other OSes you might have installed and puts them in a list for you to choose at startup. What Linux distro are you running?

 

Welcome to BC as well!

Thank you for your information.I installed ubuntu-12.04.5-desktop-amd64 but do not know if that is correct.

Should grub be included with that version ?

Rolando8



#6 bitesized1612

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Posted 23 April 2016 - 07:33 AM

I used a program called EasyBCD to easily (pun intended) swap between my partitions (7 and Linux Mint). Maybe look into that?



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#7 Al1000

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Posted 23 April 2016 - 09:17 AM

Thank you for your information.I installed ubuntu-12.04.5-desktop-amd64 but do not know if that is correct.

Should grub be included with that version ?

Rolando8

 

Hi Ronaldo8,

 

Yes grub is included in Ubuntu 12.04.5.

 

All you have to do is follow Nick's advice in post #3.

 

Please let us know if you have any further questions.



#8 Rolando8

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Posted 23 April 2016 - 10:19 AM

 

Thank you for your information.I installed ubuntu-12.04.5-desktop-amd64 but do not know if that is correct.

Should grub be included with that version ?

Rolando8

 

Hi Ronaldo8,

 

Yes grub is included in Ubuntu 12.04.5.

 

All you have to do is follow Nick's advice in post #3.

 

Please let us know if you have any further questions.

 

Yes,I do but please forgive my ignorance.What is meant by Open terminal ? And where do I find that terminal ??

 

Thanks again

 

Ronaldo8



#9 Al1000

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Posted 23 April 2016 - 01:50 PM

No problem.
  • Open DASH. (To open DASH, click on the icon at the top of the panel)
     

  • In DASH, start typing the word terminal and you should see an icon for the terminal appear (It might be called "Console" rather than "terminal" in Ubuntu, but it's the same thing.)

  • Click on the Terminal icon in DASH. A terminal should now open.
     
    It will look something like this:terminal_pic_zpsgkhzywda.png

  • Now type (or copy and paste) the command sudo update-grub into the terminal then press Enter/Return on your keyboard
     

  • You will now be asked for your password. Type your password, then press Enter/Return on your keyboard. (You will not see any feedback from the terminal while you are typing your password)
     

  • Now wait while Grub updates, which may take around 20 seconds depending on your computer. (You should see Windows mentioned in the terminal as Grub detects it)
     

Now when you restart or switch on your computer, you should be presented with a menu like the one Nick posted a pic of, where you can select Ubuntu or Windows. :)

Edited by Al1000, 23 April 2016 - 01:53 PM.


#10 MadmanRB

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Posted 23 April 2016 - 02:41 PM

!2.04? you may want a newer version.

I assume you have UEFI as grub should show off windows 7 and 12.04 did not have good uefi support.

12.04 wont be supported for long, its got only one year of support left.

Either ubuntu 14.04 or 16.04 would be a better choice.

14.04 has a lifespan that will end in 2019 and 16.04 just came out and will end support five years from now.


Edited by MadmanRB, 23 April 2016 - 02:45 PM.

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#11 Al1000

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Posted 23 April 2016 - 03:22 PM

I assume you have UEFI as grub should show off windows 7 and 12.04 did not have good uefi support.


I am assuming that the HDD that contains Windows was disconnected prior to installing Ubuntu. Computers that run Windows 7 don't typically seem to have UEFI, and Linux novices often disconnect any separate HDD containing Windows prior to installing Linux for the first time, to make absolutely sure that they don't delete Windows by mistake.

Rolando8, please let me know if you did not disconnect the drive containing Windows, before you installed Linux - I am assuming that the Windows HDD was disconnected, and that's why Windows was not detected when you installed Linux.

#12 MadmanRB

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Posted 23 April 2016 - 05:54 PM

Well it is indeed possible that this  is a UEFI setup even with windows 7 in play as it can be installed on UEFI hardware so I am not going to dismiss the possibility.

Without knowledge we can only guess where the boot issue is coming from plus this does sound like a UEFI issue

Plus the OP still may want to consider a newer version of ubuntu, Regardless of setup they should have gotten at the very least version 14.04


Edited by MadmanRB, 23 April 2016 - 05:55 PM.

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#13 cat1092

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Posted 24 April 2016 - 12:30 AM

 

 

 Computers that run Windows 7 don't typically seem to have UEFI, and Linux novices often disconnect any separate HDD containing Windows prior to installing Linux for the first time, to make absolutely sure that they don't delete Windows by mistake.

 

Just a few built before 2012 had only traditional BIOS, while this built in 2011 backwards, probably when at least half of more of Windows 7 computers sere distributed, has BIOS only. 2012 brought many 'hybrids', for Windows 7 preparation & once that OS was released, all was UEFI. 

 

I'd say that on just a dual boot of Windows 7 (even if on a UEFI machine, has to run in CSM anyway) & Linux, there's two choices. Grub & EasyBCD 2.3 from Windows. 

 

Al has a point that we often push to newbies when there's two drives, in disconnecting the one with Windows to prevent loss of data or OS, and if Grub is desired for both OS, that's fine, once plugged in, can add it to grub by opening the Terminal & typing in the below command, or copy/paste, provide root password at prompt, and Enter, Windows 7 will be added to Grub. 

 

sudo update-grub

 

The output will look something like this, but since am also running Windows 8.1 Pro, that shows instead of 7. 

 

 

cat@cat-XPS-8700 ~ $ sudo update-grub

[sudo] password for cat: 
Generating grub configuration file ...
Found linux image: /boot/vmlinuz-3.19.0-32-generic
Found initrd image: /boot/initrd.img-3.19.0-32-generic
Found linux image: /boot/vmlinuz-3.13.0-24-generic
Found initrd image: /boot/initrd.img-3.13.0-24-generic
Found memtest86+ image: /boot/memtest86+.elf
Found memtest86+ image: /boot/memtest86+.bin
Found Windows 8 (loader) on /dev/sda1
done
cat@cat-XPS-8700 ~ $ 
 

 

However, I use EasyBCD 2.3 as described above & also mentioned by bitesized1612, it's just easier for me & many others who has used the app over the years. 

 

Cat


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