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Microsoft headhunters seek Linux folk for secret open source unit


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#1 JohnC_21

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Posted 21 April 2016 - 12:54 PM

Exclusive Microsoft is recruiting from open-sourcers to build a unit apparently selling open-source wares on its Azure cloud.

Recruiters working on behalf of Microsoft have been contacting employees of Linux firms, interviewing them for what’s being called an open source practice.

Microsoft is specifically looking for those with knowledge of Linux, Ansible, Docker and Chef.

One Reg reader working for a well-known Linux distro firm told us he’d been interviewed to fill a role in pre-sales in Redmond's new open-source practice.

He said he’d been told by the interviewer that Microsoft is “very keen” to build relationships “as a result of a change of attitude towards open source technology”, the drive for which is coming from chief executive Satya Nadella.

Microsoft did not respond to repeated requests for comment.

 

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#2 Gary R

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Posted 21 April 2016 - 05:04 PM

 

.... to build a unit apparently selling open-source wares

 

I see M$ still don't really understand the concept of open-source. :rolleyes:


Edited by Gary R, 21 April 2016 - 05:05 PM.


#3 NickAu

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Posted 21 April 2016 - 05:09 PM

M$ is just trying to milk every dollar they can out of us.



#4 66Batmobile

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Posted 21 April 2016 - 05:53 PM

Okay, this definitely seems headed towards "Resistance is Futile" territory...

 

or maybe Pacino:  "Just when I thought I was out, they pull me back in."

 

:(


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#5 MadmanRB

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Posted 21 April 2016 - 08:21 PM

The FSF will sue probably


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#6 mremski

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Posted 22 April 2016 - 04:14 AM

The FSF will sue probably

Over what?  Absolutely nothing says you can't sell open source stuff.  Look at RedHat, Ubuntu/Canonical.  GPL/LGPL talks about what you need to do with any modifications (give them back to the community) and who actually owns the copyrights.  FSF would most likely get involved it MS violates the terms of the licensing on whatever Open Source sw they deal with (not pushing mods back, trying to claim ownership, etc).  

 

To me the article indicates MS is trying to "value add" to it's Azure platform, nothing more.  If people/companies don't feel there's any value there, they won't pay.  One thing alot of companies have trouble with is device drivers.  They start off picking their hw platform, a Linux distribution/version of the kernel, things work fine.  They find bugs, perhaps fixed upstream, perhaps not.  If not, now what?  Do they contract someone to fix the bug, do they hire in house expertise to fix it?  Even what seems trivial like moving to a new version of the kernel, often isn't.

 

Anyone that was around for the BSD/AT&T/SCO Unix "fun", should realize that the problems happen when one party thinks it owns something someone else wrote.


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#7 cat1092

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Posted 22 April 2016 - 04:45 AM

 

 

Absolutely nothing says you can't sell open source stuff.  Look at RedHat, Ubuntu/Canonical.

 

That's true, Canonical has sales & support offices all over the modern parts of the world, specializing in custom OS's for most any business one can think of, be it the financial sectors (think banks & online transactions), government agencies of all types worldwide, and even physician's offices where there's not enough seats to qualify for W10 Enterprise licensing, running Pro is not the answer, would violate the HIPPA act (in the US), because of the uncontrollable uploading of sensitive data through the hardware, only offers more features than the Home license, doesn't stop the uploading of data. That function is only available for Enterprise subscribers. 

 

That's where the subscription based Linux versions comes into play, tax accountants has been running Red Hat for years, because they save lots of cash in reusing the same computers for many years. Of course by now, most are on 64 bit hardware for speed, security that only the 64 bit CPU & OS can deliver, and I personally feel that Canonical, as well as the distributors of Red Hat deserves to earn a living. Remember, they're not 'selling' the OS's, rather subscriptions & more important for business, service after the sale.

 

If one wants a 'free' Red Hat, look no further than CentOS, which is the testing bed that the developers uses to improve their bread & butter distro. Some of the software is actually good, just doesn't make the final cut into the next Red Hat release, so one can see the free CentOS as more than a testbed, if they want to use it w/out support, that's fine & permissible for personal use (not sure about business, yet what's there to stop them?). 

 

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#8 mremski

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Posted 22 April 2016 - 05:37 AM

I've worked at places that use CentOS and Fedora for the basis of shipping products, they're good distributions.  RH Enterprise Linux gets you paid support and a few other goodies;  if you don't need them, don't pay for them.


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