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"When Windows 10 breaks, don't just blame Microsoft", via ZDNet


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#1 Aura

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Posted 18 April 2016 - 08:43 AM

It's often easy to blame Microsoft for every flaw and failing in our Windows update experience. The fault, dear reader, may not be in the updates, but in our own installs.


Source: http://www.zdnet.com/article/when-windows-10-breaks-dont-just-blame-microsoft/

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#2 britechguy

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Posted 18 April 2016 - 09:41 AM

 

It's often easy to blame Microsoft for every flaw and failing in our Windows update experience. The fault, dear reader, may not be in the updates, but in our own installs.


Source: http://www.zdnet.com/article/when-windows-10-breaks-dont-just-blame-microsoft/

 

 

This article is 100% consistent with my observation that certain Windows 10 upgrades have been "cursed" from the start and that most that I've dealt with that fit that description have been on upgrades from Windows 7 machines.

 

What I found interesting, and that was glossed over a bit too much for my taste in the article, was the direct observation that the computer under discussion "was starting to act up," and that the hope was, "to see if an in-place Windows 10 install would smooth out the rough edges."   While I've even succumbed to this tempting delusion in the past, that's what it is:  a delusion.  You're applying an upgrade on what you already know to be a shaky foundation and it should come as no surprise that this doesn't end well.

 

That being said, it is really valuable to have someone in the tech press point out:

  1. that the choice to "build on quicksand" is fraught to begin with.
  2. there are many factors outside the Windows 10 OS itself (or any OS itself, for that matter) that can result in what initially appear to be OS-related errors.

It's easy to lay blame at the target you'd like to lay it on.  Finding out what's really happening is a far more arduous task.


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    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#3 Guest_hollowface_*

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Posted 18 April 2016 - 10:52 PM

I usually do clean-installs of operating systems. Not just Windows, any OS.

When this problem exploded shortly after I upgraded, I was convinced Windows 10 was at fault.
-REF:http://www.zdnet.com/article/when-windows-10-breaks-dont-just-blame-microsoft/

I'd say the blame is 50/50. Microsoft is at fault for pushing the ability to upgrade an OS, when they are well aware that majority of their users (many of which are non-technical users) use 3rd party software and hardware (which may or may not be compatible with Windows 10!).  The user is at fault, because it is their responsibility to check that any 3rd party software they've installed will be compatible. That's part of the job of having your own computer.

I've started noticing some nice new features. My favorite so far is a small one. But because I use it so often, it's big to me. The Snipping Tool in Windows 10 now has a delay-before-snip option. Nice. That'll get used. A lot.
-REF:http://www.zdnet.com/article/when-windows-10-breaks-dont-just-blame-microsoft/

While I do not use that feature, I too am glad it was added! I use the Snipping Tool all the time.

#4 eLPuSHeR

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Posted 19 April 2016 - 03:32 AM

I usually do clean installations when possible.



#5 Niweg

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Posted 19 April 2016 - 02:55 PM

 Too many folks do things like running so-called registry cleaners and then are surprised when they upgrade and find problems.  A lot of folks try to upgrade laptops for no good reason, and that is fraught with peril because parts are proprietary in laptops, and getting the right drivers is often difficult or simply unavailable.  And the biggest mistake is doing the upgrade without making a full system backup to an external hard drive.  That's why I look at a lot of these "I upgraded to 10 and _____ doesn't work now" posts with a jaundiced eye.  I'd say the majority of this kind of posts fall into one of the above categories.  And the sad thing is that most of these folks didn't really need to do the upgrade in the first place.  HUMBUG!   :rolleyes:


Make regular full system backups or you'll be sorry sooner or later.


#6 rp88

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Posted 21 April 2016 - 02:19 PM

The fact is ofcourse that if users could reject update they didn't want then they could just install the security ones, never bother with the others (which are rarely of any use) and rarely if ever have big problems caused by updates. Most of the time the updates which cause trouble are actually some pretty pointless ones, especially those designed to change certain currency symbols to reflect the ways nations switch currency over time. There are a huge number of updates which are only of relevance to a tiny few, like currency symbol changes, only those few actually need them. The same infact goes for a lot of non-security bug fixes. If users could just refuse the updates they don't want then this whole business wouldn't be an issue. Making previously optional things mandatory almost always leads to problems. I for one will never be upgrading, the inability to reject unwanted updates is one of my reasons for this decision. Users who feel like I do are best sticking with operating systems where they can block unwanted updates.


As a note about "fixing things by upgrading", I absolutely agree britechguy. You don't fix dodgy foundations with an extra floor on top of your building. Users having problems with windows 7/8/8.1 systems are best to go back to a good system image or to restore to the factory fresh state, although things like removing un-necessary programs, clearing up old temp files (these can add to gigabytes if you don't clear them for years), making sure your antivirus works and you aren't infected, stopping un-necessary startup tasks... these all do a lot more good for systems that trying to upgrade them does.

Edited by rp88, 21 April 2016 - 02:19 PM.

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#7 MadmanRB

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Posted 21 April 2016 - 02:28 PM

In other words, if Windows 10 fails blame the user.

Its like calling a bluescreen of death a "feature"


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#8 Aura

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Posted 21 April 2016 - 02:29 PM

In other words, if Windows 10 fails blame the user.


If you read the article, you'll see that it's actually saying to not blame Windows 10 for everything, as it might not even be the OS' fault, but the user's.

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#9 MadmanRB

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Posted 21 April 2016 - 02:30 PM

My point exactly


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#10 Aura

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Posted 21 April 2016 - 02:32 PM

Uh? Your last post was sarcastic, but now you agree to my point?

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#11 MadmanRB

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Posted 21 April 2016 - 02:38 PM

No I wasnt being sarcastic, I was being sardonic.

In a sense this is the came tune Microsoft has sung itself in the past, a bad song at that if I may be frank.

I think the article is quite crap as it doesnt take into the account of the windows 10 upgrade being snuck into some peoples systems even without the permission of said user.

The average user just want to shove the updates away and not give them a second look as they just want to get on with their lives but then have windows10 forced on them so Windows is just as guilty if not guiltier of the errors users experience


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#12 rp88

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Posted 21 April 2016 - 02:47 PM

"...doesnt take into the account of the windows 10 upgrade being snuck into some peoples systems even without the permission of said user..."

I thought this article was more about upgrades to systems already running windows 10, but yes GWX is certainly a problem update, and the user definitely is not at fault when GWX causes a problem. And I can quite imagine that many users, thanks to GWX, ended up on windows 10 without asking for it, perhaps not realising that it was a whole new OS not just an update to an OS. Users whose systems weren't in the best state, and then upgraded without them asking for it, might have caused the problems that lead to the OS being "on shaky ground" but if they didn't plan to upgrade and then it just happened they can hardly be to blame for the fact that their systems (previously messy but working ok) are not coping so well when windows 10 decides it wants to update.

Edited by rp88, 21 April 2016 - 02:47 PM.

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#13 MadmanRB

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Posted 21 April 2016 - 02:49 PM

Well if you want to that into account windows is definitely to blame, the updates should have more testing first.


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#14 bignurse

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Posted 24 April 2016 - 06:34 PM

True but when you by a new Windows 10 computer and the problems with it start before the computer is done with the original configuration and before you even have a chance to install software it is very easy to blame Windows 10. (basically erased the OS while it was configuring itself and had to be re-installed) When you are talking about 7 to 14 hours on a new computer to install and first updates it ruins you view of the OS.



#15 Porthos

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Posted 26 April 2016 - 01:47 PM

True but when you by a new Windows 10 computer and the problems with it start before the computer is done with the original configuration and before you even have a chance to install software it is very easy to blame Windows 10. (basically erased the OS while it was configuring itself and had to be re-installed) When you are talking about 7 to 14 hours on a new computer to install and first updates it ruins you view of the OS.

I would blame that on the software/junk the OEM adds to every computer. Unless there is a hardware/driver issue a clean install works fine.






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