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"SMART" Warning for hard drive. Should I worry?


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#1 HobbesD

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Posted 17 April 2016 - 11:23 PM

I've been using a Dell XPS 8700 PC for just barely two years, currently running Windows 10. It has a 2TB standard hard drive and also a small (I think 32 gig?) solid state drive, configured just to speed up the PC/operating system. It came pre-installed with a program called "Intel Rapid Start Technology Manager" that handles that aspect. Anyway, the other day I get a warning message from this Intel Rapid Start Technology Manager that says:

 

"SATA disk on Controller 0, Port 0: At risk (SMART event)"

 

I had idea what that meant, but after doing some quick research it seems to indicate that despite the fact that my PC is running fine now, there is a problem with my 2TB drive and it will eventually fail in a matter of days, weeks, or months.

 

Are these SMART events always indicative of future hard drive damage? Is there any way I can confirm there is a problem with my hard drive? I've scanned the drive with Windows and it said there were no problems. I'm trying to back up what I can, but I'd really like to be able to figure out exactly what the problem is, or if there even is a problem. I have a warranty with Dell, but a moderator on Dell's help forum didn't seem to think Dell would offer a replacement until the drive actually failed. Does anyone have experience with that?

 

Thank you so much in advance for your answers.



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#2 Platypus

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Posted 17 April 2016 - 11:41 PM

What brand of drive is it? The best approach is to test the drive with diagnostics provided by the manufacturer if possible.
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#3 rqt

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Posted 18 April 2016 - 03:13 AM

It has been said that there are 2 type of hard disk drive - those that have failed & those that are going to fail. Many of those that have failed did so either without warning, or with warning signs that were ignored.

Ensure that all your data is backed up IMMEDIATELY before you start messing about with any diagnostics or further debate (running diagnostics on a faulty drive can sometimes cause it to fail completely).

Hard drives are cheap.

Your data may well be irreplaceable.

Edited by rqt, 18 April 2016 - 03:22 AM.


#4 Platypus

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Posted 18 April 2016 - 03:37 AM

a moderator on Dell's help forum didn't seem to think Dell would offer a replacement until the drive actually failed.


Is there a hardware test option in the BIOS setup? Some brands do have this, and a manufacturer should accept the result of their own diagnostic if the drive does not pass. (As they should for the drive manufacturer's diagnostic report.)

I agree with rqt's caution regarding having the drive contents backed up before putting the drive through diagnostics - even Windows' drive integrity/chkdsk can result in data loss on a failing drive.

As for how accurate and how much warning when it comes to SMART, there's genuinely no way to predict the speed of drive degradation, but it's safe to say that a warning almost certainly indicates the drive has started the journey to failure. A diagnostic that can interpret the SMART results helps by showing which parameter(s) are degrading.

Edited by Platypus, 18 April 2016 - 03:38 AM.

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#5 MadmanRB

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Posted 18 April 2016 - 09:20 PM

I would make a note of the make and model of your hard drive and inform us as we can possibly assist you in determining if the drive is failing or not. Usually this smart data test is a good indicator though of a failing hard drive and knowing the make and model of your hard drive can point us in the right direction

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#6 HobbesD

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Posted 18 April 2016 - 09:44 PM

Wow, thanks for the replies already!

 

Using Device Manager, I found that my hard drive is a Seagate. Model number ST2000DM001-1CH

 

The next thing I tried was downloading and installing SeaTools for Windows. It installed fine, but every time I try to run any kind of test with it, "short generic", "long generic", whatever, I get a windows pop up that says "stxcon.exe has stopped working, A problem caused the program to stop working correctly. Windows will close the program and notify you if a solution is available." When I click on the "close program" button on this message, it takes leaves me back at SeaTools, which says it's running whatever test I ordered, but doesn't actually appear to.

 

So I tried downloading the SeaTools ISO for DOS. I burned it to a CD and it's my understanding that you simply leave the CD in the drive and restart your computer and it boots into it. It doesn't, it just boots back into windows.

 

So I right clicked on my hard drive under Device Manager and clicked "Update Driver Software". It tells me I have the most up to date driver.

 

I have no idea where to go from here. Now I not only know what is wrong with my hard drive, I don't even know why I can't run drive diagnostic tools. I am embarrassed and feel dumb.

 

The computer continues to run fine today.

 

Thanks again for taking out the time to read and help.



#7 MadmanRB

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Posted 18 April 2016 - 10:14 PM

Seagate well that explains a lot... well bugger best to backup your data if possible and prepare to get a new hard drive as Seagate these days is a terrible hard drive company known for making hard drives that only last two years maximum

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#8 Platypus

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Posted 19 April 2016 - 03:51 AM

Seatools may have suffered a bad download, the way to check would be to uninstall it, get a fresh download of the installer and do the install again.

With the boot CD, there is probably an on-screen prompt for a keypress to choose boot priority, possibly F12. Tap that during boot until the boot menu is shown, choose the optical drive. You did select to create a CD from the ISO image didn't you, rather than just burning a copy of the ISO file onto a data CD?
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#9 HobbesD

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Posted 19 April 2016 - 09:14 PM

Seatools may have suffered a bad download, the way to check would be to uninstall it, get a fresh download of the installer and do the install again.

With the boot CD, there is probably an on-screen prompt for a keypress to choose boot priority, possibly F12. Tap that during boot until the boot menu is shown, choose the optical drive. You did select to create a CD from the ISO image didn't you, rather than just burning a copy of the ISO file onto a data CD?

 

I tried your suggestions. I deleted the Seatools installer and uninstalled Seatools itself, redownloaded and reinstalled it. Same error message.

 

With the boot CD, I did burn the image and not a copy of the ISO file. I tried pressing F12 at start up and got a screen that said:

 

"Boot Mode is set to UEFI; Secure Boot:ON

 

UEFI BOOT: Windows

Boot Manager

UFIO OS

Other Options:

BIOS Setup

Diagnostics

Change Boot Mood Setting

Device Configuration"

 

I have no idea where to go from here.

 

I sent an email to Seagate, and they wrote me back saying that I needed to talk to Dell. So now I have to start that. I'll keep you updated, and again, thanks for talking to me during this mini-ordeal of mine.



#10 JohnC_21

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Posted 19 April 2016 - 09:16 PM

Highlight Diagnostics and let it run through the tests.



#11 MadmanRB

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Posted 19 April 2016 - 09:19 PM

Try turning off your secure boot, luckily your Dell does allow this:

https://www.manualowl.com/m/Dell/XPS-8700/Manual/363196?page=80


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#12 Platypus

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Posted 19 April 2016 - 10:58 PM

Yes, try the BIOS diagnostic first, as I already commented Dell should accept this if it delivers an adverse report on the condition of the drive. Also I should have realised you would need to change the mode from UEFI to Legacy, as UEFI will not boot from the optical drive.
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#13 HobbesD

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Posted 20 April 2016 - 09:10 PM

Yes, try the BIOS diagnostic first, as I already commented Dell should accept this if it delivers an adverse report on the condition of the drive. Also I should have realised you would need to change the mode from UEFI to Legacy, as UEFI will not boot from the optical drive.

So I ran the Dell diagnostic from the F12 screen and... it came up completely clean. I even did the "thorough" option, which spent hours testing the entire hard drive. It said all tests passed and no errors were found. So now I'm even more confused.



#14 Platypus

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Posted 21 April 2016 - 04:25 AM

I think there can be transient SMART events that clear, others are cumulative. To be sure, I'd say it would be best if you could get the Seagate diagnostics to work for you.
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#15 Bulgaristan

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Posted 21 April 2016 - 07:47 AM

Use this tool HDD regenerator.

You ca use the free trial for just checking your hard drive.

Please use it to create a bootable media from the software is pretty simple.

Load the software and go for the options :

1. choose your hard drive

2. go for scan without repairing 

3. start from sector 0

 

Find a way to take a picture of the scan and posted in here so I can take a look :) 

Cheers,
Andy 


Edited by Bulgaristan, 21 April 2016 - 07:47 AM.





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