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Replace a HDD with an SSD


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#1 cmptrgy

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Posted 17 April 2016 - 08:05 PM

Computer: HP Compaq 6000 Pro SFF Win10 Pro SP1 32-bit desktop

--- I want to replace a ST3160318AS Hard drive (160.04 GB) in my computer with an SSD

 

About a year ago I purchased a Crucial MX200 250GB 2.5-INCH internal SSD CT6746138 SATA 6Gbps 555 MB/s Read / 500 MB/s Write (P/N CT6746138) that I was going to install into a Vista desktop but never got around to it. I believe I can use this SSD in the computer. I checked out Crucial for their recommendation for my Win10 Pro desktop and they have the same model with the same specs (P/N CT6750284): the only thing that’s different is their part #’s. If the P/N makes a difference, I’d appreciate knowing that.

 

I hope to clone my HDD to the SSD

However I’m not a hardware person so I’m going to asking some questions on how to accomplish that.

 

The instructions that came with the SSD instructs me to go to www.acronis.com/en-us/promo/tihd-download and run an .exe and follow instructions proceed with the SSD installation along with using an Acronis True Image HD Software Activation Key. I want to believe I can follow those instructions but my concern is will this end up costing me plus will I have to depend on Acronis all the time?

 

I was planning on using Macrium Reflect for the cloning and installation process: should I still consider it?

 

Another issue I see is that I’ll have to clone to the SSD as an external drive.

--- So I’ll need to use a USB SSD enclosure while cloning

--- Crucial has a 2.5” External Hard Drive/SSD Enclosure USB 2.0 P/N CTENCLOSEUSB2 available

--- That looks like it will do the job. Am I correct?

 

Crucial has a 3.5” adapter bracket P/N CTSSDBRKT35 available

--- That looks like it’s what I’ll need. Am I correct?

 

When it’s time finally install and use the SSD into the computer what cable(s) do I need to connect it to?

And then do I need to make any new connections on the MB?

 

Well I guess it’s obvious I’m not a hardware person but I’m willing to learn what I need to do.



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#2 Ram4x4

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Posted 18 April 2016 - 06:04 AM

To be honest the best thing to do is to copy your data off the old drive, do a full clean install of Windows on the new SSD, then copy your data files over to it.

 

It's more work and time to do this, but the end results are usually better.  You get  a nice clean install with no "baggage" from previous installs. 

 

The various cloning programs do work, mostly, but there's no guarantees, especially if you've never done it before or aren't familiar with imaging a system or cloning drives.

 

There's no harm in attempting to clone it, after all, if it doesn't clone right it just won't run right when you put the SSD in as the main drive.  You could always put the original drive back in and try again.  Up to you.

 

You don't have to use an external enclosure.  You could install the SSD on another SATA port in your system and clone the primary drive to it, then remove the old, primary drive and make the new SSD the primary drive. 

 

You may need to get a bracket to mount the small SSD into a standard size HDD bay in your case if it doesn't have one specifically for an SSD already.  I can't tell you that without seeing your case.

 

You'll need a SATA data cable and a power source for the new SSD.  Check your current set up to see if you have a spare SATA power plug available from the power supply.  If so, all you need is a SATA data cable.  One end will need to go to the motherboard into one of your other SATA ports not currently in use.

 

If your system has no spare SATA ports available on the motherboard, then you'll need to do the external enclosure thing.  Any SATA to USB external enclosure will work, it doesn't have to be a Crucial brand one specifically.  These things are ubiquitous and cheap.  Get one off Amazon if you need one.



#3 cmptrgy

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Posted 18 April 2016 - 09:05 AM

"the best thing to do is to copy your data off the old drive, do a full clean install of Windows on the new SSD, then copy your data files over to it." I would go with that. Copying the data off the old drive is easy for me to do.

However I have Win10 Pro upgraded from Win7 Pro on my computer.

If I use the Win10 Media Creation Tool can I do a full clean install of Win10 Pro onto the new bare SSD once the SSD has been setup and installed according to the ACRONIS system installation?

--- I ran Belarc and they report a product key: would I need to use that?

 

BTW, my desktop computer is a SFF so I don't have much flexibility to work with it from what I can see.

In order to remove the internal hard drive I have to lift the power supply out of the way and everything looks pretty tight compared to removing and replacing a hard drive in a regular tower.

 

"You may need to get a bracket to mount the small SSD into a standard size HDD bay"

I do plan on getting the proper bracket for the SSD.

 

In case it helps, this is what I'm using for reference

Maintenance and Service Guide HP Compaq 6000 Pro Business PC

http://h20628.www2.hp.com/km-ext/kmcsdirect/emr_na-c01869681-3.pdf

Removal and Replacement Procedures Small Form Factor (SFF) Chassis Page 134

 

"You'll need a SATA data cable and a power source for the new SSD.  Check your current set up to see if you have a spare SATA power plug available from the power supply.  If so, all you need is a SATA data cable.  One end will need to go to the motherboard into one of your other SATA ports not currently in use.

If your system has no spare SATA ports available on the motherboard, then you'll need to do the external enclosure thing"

Those are good explanations. I'll need to check them out.



#4 Ram4x4

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Posted 18 April 2016 - 09:26 AM

"the best thing to do is to copy your data off the old drive, do a full clean install of Windows on the new SSD, then copy your data files over to it." I would go with that. Copying the data off the old drive is easy for me to do. [/size]
 
However I have Win10 Pro upgraded from Win7 Pro on my computer. [/size]
 
If I use the Win10 Media Creation Tool can I do a full clean install of Win10 Pro onto the new bare SSD once the SSD has been setup and installed according to the ACRONIS system installation?[/size]
 
--- I ran Belarc and they report a product key: would I need to use that?[/size]


Yes, you can create Windows 10 install media and then use that to reinstall Windows 10 cleanly. Yes, you will need your product key to activate it. Before you do that though, you will need to deactivate your current install, otherwise your new Win 10 install won't activate. I ran into that when I originally upgraded to Win 10 on my old system, then built a new one and loaded Win 10. Had to get Microsoft on the phone to fix it as the old system was not bootable in order to remove the product key/deactivate it. Microsoft has gotten very good at detecting and activating windows now, so it's hard to get around it (prevents key sharing/piracy, etc).
 

 [/size]
 
BTW, my desktop computer is a SFF so I don't have much flexibility to work with it from what I can see.[/size]
 
In order to remove the internal hard drive I have to lift the power supply out of the way and everything looks pretty tight compared to removing and replacing a hard drive in a regular tower.[/size]
 [/size]


Ugh. I hate SFF cases for home use. They're fine for businesses and such that have no intentions of adding components, etc, but make life rough for home users in your situation.
 

"You may need to get a bracket to mount the small SSD into a standard size HDD bay"[/size]
 
I do plan on getting the proper bracket for the SSD.[/size]
 
 [/size]
 
In case it helps, this is what I'm using for reference[/size]
 
Maintenance and Service Guide HP Compaq 6000 Pro Business PC[/size]
 
http://h20628.www2.hp.com/km-ext/kmcsdirect/emr_na-c01869681-3.pdf[/size]
 
Removal and Replacement Procedures Small Form Factor (SFF) Chassis Page 134[/size]
 
 [/size]
 
"You'll need a SATA data cable and a power source for the new SSD.  Check your current set up to see if you have a spare SATA power plug available from the power supply.  If so, all you need is a SATA data cable.  One end will need to go to the motherboard into one of your other SATA ports not currently in use.[/size]
 
If your system has no spare SATA ports available on the motherboard, then you'll need to do the external enclosure thing"[/size]
 
Those are good explanations. I'll need to check them out.[/size]



#5 cmptrgy

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Posted 18 April 2016 - 05:19 PM

OK here is a summary of my plan

Connect the SSD via USB SSD enclosure

Use the Acronis True Image HD Software to install the SSD

Clone the computer’s 160GB hard drive to the 250GB SSD hard drive with Macrium Reflect Free unless the Acronis True Image HD Software includes the cloning procedure

Remove the computer’s 160GB hard drive

Install the 250GB SSD with its adapter bracket into the computer and make the new SSD the primary drive.

--- Is there something I’ll need to adjust in order for the new SSD to be recognized as the primary drive?

Page 152 of http://h20628.www2.hp.com/km-ext/kmcsdirect/emr_na-c01869681-3.pdf shows the system board drive connections with 4 SATA connections.

I imagine I’ll have questions along the way once I get going as this is all new to me but it is what it is.



#6 Ram4x4

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Posted 19 April 2016 - 03:50 PM

If you install the SSD into an external enclosure then there is no need to use Acronis to install anything.  Hook up the SSD to USB, then run the drive cloning software and select your system drive as the source and your external USB drive as the target.



#7 cmptrgy

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Posted 06 May 2016 - 08:21 PM

I finally got back to this project and it was a complete success. Thank you for your advice.

Now I have a follow up issue I want to address.

The original hard drive was 160GB aAttached File  SSD Partitions.PNG   8.92KB   0 downloadsnd the new SSD is 250GB.

In disk management there is an unallocated 83.84GB partition.

Can I get that into the C: portion of the drive?

--- I would also like to know why the 450MB portion is striped.

Edit: Well I didn't include the partition image well but I don't know how to move it over.

I hope you can make sense of of what I'm asking for.


Edited by cmptrgy, 06 May 2016 - 08:23 PM.


#8 Agouti

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Posted 07 May 2016 - 09:46 AM

First of all, partitioning is serious business.  If something goes wrong, you could lose your all your data.  Make sure you make a backup first!

 

Normally, if the space was adjacent to the C partition, you could simply extend the partition and take up the unallocated space.  In your case, you have a 450MB Recovery partition sitting between the C partition and the unallocated space.  I faced with a similar issue in the past.  The only free partitioning tool I found that was able to solve this issue was AOMEI Partition Assistant Standard.  Use the "merge" function.



#9 cmptrgy

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Posted 09 May 2016 - 09:41 AM

The SSD install I did also includes NEW VOLUME E in This PC and it included some duplicate folders and files from my C:\Users\ldg11\documents. I followed MR steps but that doesn’t seem right to me. According to disk management NEW VOLUME E is a 4.30 GB FAT32 partition. If someone can clarify whether or not I am correct plus what that partition is for it would be appreciated.

With all of that said I am going to put the original HDD back in and start over. I reviewed MR SSD installation section and see if I can do better this time because I want to get this right.

I’m thinking of buying Scott Muellers Upgrading and Repairing PCs (22nd Edition) at Amazon as I see some chapters on hard drives. I’m not a hardware person but I like figuring things out but I need a better understanding of working with hard drives. Any opinions?

 

Attached File  SSD NEW VOLUME E 05-09-16.PNG   6.5KB   0 downloads

 

 






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