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Installing Windows on SSD drive


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#1 Elysium

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Posted 15 April 2016 - 02:09 PM

Hello Dear friends,
 
I need your advice for installing a Windows 7, 8.1, 10 on SSD. Does it requires any special method of installation? I have never installed on it a windows. does it difference installation between HDD and SSD? Someone tell me SSD requires a GPT partitions and what is it? Please provide me advice or  help. Thanks in advanced.

Edited by Queen-Evie, 15 April 2016 - 04:41 PM.
moved from Mini guides and how-tos - Simple answers to common questions to Internal Hardware since it asks about 3 different operating systems


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#2 hamluis

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Posted 15 April 2016 - 05:38 PM

My experience with installing Windows on SSDs...was no different than my experiences installing the same version of Windows on hard drives.  Ditto for cloning.

 

An SSD does not require a GPT partition...that requirement traces to whether or not the motherboard supports UEFI, nothing to do with the drive.

 

I have dual-boots (XP and Win 7) on my 2 desktops, each has an SSD as the boot/programs partition/drive.

 

Louis



#3 Elysium

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Posted 16 April 2016 - 07:16 AM

Thanks for support sir.



#4 DavisMcCarn

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Posted 16 April 2016 - 12:53 PM

The only issue with SSD's is what known as the alignment in that virtually all of the SSD's are 4096 (4KB or 8 sectors) memory "chunks" and using an old XP CD to create a traditional partition makes a partition that is "misaligned" meaning that the old, standard, 63 sector offset, isn't evenly divisible by 8.  If you use an XP CD to create the partition, every change in the SSD turns into a multi block read-modify-write operation that kills performance and shortens the life of the SSD.  The fix is simple. If you want to install XP, use a Windows 7 DVD to create the partition then reboot to the XP CD and tell it to leave the partitions alone.


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#5 Elysium

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Posted 18 April 2016 - 02:43 AM

The only issue with SSD's is what known as the alignment in that virtually all of the SSD's are 4096 (4KB or 8 sectors) memory "chunks" and using an old XP CD to create a traditional partition makes a partition that is "misaligned" meaning that the old, standard, 63 sector offset, isn't evenly divisible by 8.  If you use an XP CD to create the partition, every change in the SSD turns into a multi block read-modify-write operation that kills performance and shortens the life of the SSD.  The fix is simple. If you want to install XP, use a Windows 7 DVD to create the partition then reboot to the XP CD and tell it to leave the partitions alone.

Thanks bro for advise i appreciate it.






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