Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Article about Back-Ups (long)


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 techphobe

techphobe

  • Members
  • 41 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Local time:12:12 PM

Posted 12 April 2016 - 05:21 PM

https://discussions.apple.com/docs/DOC-6031
 
The bits of the piece that stood out for me were:  
 
Drives written to once and stored away have the highest risk of data corruption due to not being read/written to on a regular basis. Rotate older working HD into low-risk use.
 
I do that.   :blush:
 
 
Do not use included HD "software" that came on your new external HD. All such free software is useless, and often causes issues. Unless you have a RAID array that necessitates using software for the external system, always format your new HD from the box and erase its contents.
 


My Time Machine backup is not big enough, therefore…?
As data becomes larger and larger each year, and now a terabyte is generally considered ‘not that much space’ a single HD backup of your system OS and large files is not feasible for a time machine backup. Keep your computer ‘clean’, meaning keep all your applications and important use files on your Mac, but large video, picture, and data collections off your Mac that you aren’t using on a regular basis.
 
 
 
 
 
All hard drives will die in roughly 3-8 years, even under ideal storage conditions.
 
 
 
They also name DVDs as ideal archive for data (keeps for 50 years??). I thought they were one of the quickest things to fail. The article's about 2 years old but I thought DVDs were considered an antique storage system even then. I have a lot of Verbatim DVDs and about 10% don't play when I try, & they're only about 5-10 years old.

 

Edit: Moved topic from Mac OS to the more appropriate forum. ~ Animal



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 Twin B

Twin B

  • Members
  • 266 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:More Than a Mile High
  • Local time:08:12 AM

Posted 12 April 2016 - 07:42 PM

I'm with you as far as thinking DVDs are far from an ideal archive. Mine fail to be read routinely.


I've learned blood is not thicker than money. 

 


#3 smax013

smax013

  • BC Advisor
  • 2,329 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:09:12 AM

Posted 13 April 2016 - 06:09 AM

DVD+/-R discs can be a very good option for archiving data. Just make sure to get quality blank media and store them in a place aware from sunlight and in normal room temperature & humidity.

And just like any backup type scenario, have multiple copies preferably on different media. In todays world, big hard drives are relatively cheap. So, in addition to archiving to DVD+/-R discs, archive that data to a hard drive.

And last, just because you are archiving the data does not mean that you should not check on that data every once and a while to make sure it is still restorable. A good backup is only as good as your ability to restore from that backup. So, if you don't test that ability to restore that data every once and a while, you might not be able to do so when you really need it.

#4 smax013

smax013

  • BC Advisor
  • 2,329 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:09:12 AM

Posted 13 April 2016 - 06:21 AM

https://discussions.apple.com/docs/DOC-6031
 
The bits of the piece that stood out for me were:  
 
Drives written to once and stored away have the highest risk of data corruption due to not being read/written to on a regular basis. Rotate older working HD into low-risk use.
 
I do that.   :blush:
 
 
Do not use included HD "software" that came on your new external HD. All such free software is useless, and often causes issues. Unless you have a RAID array that necessitates using software for the external system, always format your new HD from the box and erase its contents.


That is likely because "free" software that comes with external hard drives are usually limited in what it can do. Most third party paid (and some free) software will have way more features. Also some of that free backup software might store the backup files in some proprietary file format.
 
 
 

My Time Machine backup is not big enough, therefore…?
As data becomes larger and larger each year, and now a terabyte is generally considered ‘not that much space’ a single HD backup of your system OS and large files is not feasible for a time machine backup. Keep your computer ‘clean’, meaning keep all your applications and important use files on your Mac, but large video, picture, and data collections off your Mac that you aren’t using on a regular basis.



The thing to keep in mind is that Time Machine is a backup program that also does versioning. As such, when you edit a file, both the new and old version will be there on the backup. In fact, if it is a file you frequently edit over a period of say months, then you could have 10s, if not 100s, of versions of that file in the Time Machine backup. If that file also happens to be a large file (say a video file you are editing), then you could many versions/copies of that large video file in the backup, which will cause the backup space to get really large quickly...especially if that is not the only large file you are editing.
 
 

All hard drives will die in roughly 3-8 years, even under ideal storage conditions.



I would argue that it should be "most drives" or "many drives" rather "all drives". I have drives that still work that are far older than 8 years. And, in theory, SSD will for much longer times, although we really don't enough real work experience to know that for certain (sure, there are benchmark typing testing to simulate years of use, but that is not 100% the same as a drive sitting out somewhere in the world for years and years exposed to various environmental factors).
 
 
 
 

They also name DVDs as ideal archive for data (keeps for 50 years??). I thought they were one of the quickest things to fail. The article's about 2 years old but I thought DVDs were considered an antique storage system even then. I have a lot of Verbatim DVDs and about 10% don't play when I try, & they're only about 5-10 years old.



See my other post.

Edited by smax013, 13 April 2016 - 06:22 AM.


#5 rp88

rp88

  • Members
  • 3,061 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:02:12 PM

Posted 13 April 2016 - 03:48 PM

"Drives written to once and stored away have the highest risk of data corruption due to not being read/written to on a regular basis. Rotate older working HD into low-risk use."
If this is true then it's definitely concerning, I do it to, although more often with USB sticks and cd-rw/cd/dvd discs than with hard drives.



"Do not use included HD "software" that came on your new external HD"
That's quite true, the software might not be bad or useless, it may work fine, but it's easier to just copy and paste individual files and folders across. Also you can be more certain that the exact things you needed to backup, are backed up, and more than that you can be sure that you have backed up copies from particular times, no risk of syncing over a good original with a damaged later version.

Edited by rp88, 13 April 2016 - 03:48 PM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users