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About to order custom-built computer


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#1 Tristinn

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Posted 10 April 2016 - 04:15 AM

Hello,

This post is my last ditch effort to obtain some last minute advice before ordering my new custom-built computer.

The computer I presently own was a hand-me-down from good friends which came from the same folks I'm about to order the new computer from.  After a couple of trips to them for minor repairs I came away so impressed with this outfit that I determined my new computer would come from them as well.

I've already chosen all the major details  -- 500 GB SATA hard drive, Intel i5 - 4570, eVGA GT-610-2GB video card, mother board, sound card, etc.

My biggest challenge is that for reasons I won't bother going into, I AM STUCK ON A DIAL-UP INTERNET CONNECTION FOR THE FORESEEABLE FUTURE.

I've read up on the subject and concluded that there is not much I can do about this limitation.  Until the U.S. joins its European counterparts in upgrading its fiber-optic infrastructure, 56k is the best I can expect out of my telephone line.  I live most of the year in the Boston area and have my dialer set to hang up unless it achieves a minimum of 49k dial-up speed.

But apart from purchasing the most up-to-date modem, is there anything else I can do to improve my dial-up performance?  Already there are a number of mega corporations whose sites I am no longer able to navigate on a dial-up connection and they don't seem to give a hoot whether they are meeting the needs of their dial-up customers (This includes my bleeping bank, which,after introducing its spanking new web site three months ago with great fanfare, decided it was not worth its while to make its new site accessible to its dial-up customers, hence, no more online banking for me).

I know obtaining a maximum amount of RAM should help with making the newer, ultra-bloated browsers slightly more efficient (I currently use K-Meleon for 95% of my browsing.  It's tiny and incredibly fast, but sites with security protocols refuse to recognize it as an "accepted" browser.)  For such sites I use a regularly updated version of Firefox.  (Installing Avast permanently broke Internet Explorer for me a couple of years ago.)  But is there anything else I can do?

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On another subject, I have one more question.  I am still in possession of half-a-dozen hard drives from previous computers.  One of them will go into the new computer as my slave drive, but I still want to be able to easily access the content of those older drives.  I was thinking an external docking station.  But the fellows at my custom outfit don't seem to think very much of that idea.  Any alternative suggestions?

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I am open to any and all suggestions.  Because of my dial-up connection I will never need equipment to watch streaming video or YouTube videos.  But I do a lot of fiddling around with graphics, fixing up old slides and photos for friends.  Because the majority of my more-than-a-dozen graphic programs work perfectly with Windows XP and I don't want to shell out to upgrade them to work with newer versions of Windows, I intend to have a dual-boot system that will allow me to continue using those older programs while switching to Windows 7 or 10 strictly for when I'm online (I hate Windows 8).

Again, any helpful input would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance,

Tristinn
 


Edited by Queen-Evie, 11 April 2016 - 07:57 AM.
moved from System Building and Upgrading


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#2 Drillingmachine

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Posted 10 April 2016 - 07:13 AM

Hello,

This post is my last ditch effort to obtain some last minute advice before ordering my new custom-built computer.

The computer I presently own was a hand-me-down from good friends which came from the same folks I'm about to order the new computer from.  After a couple of trips to them for minor repairs I came away so impressed with this outfit that I determined my new computer would come from them as well.

I've already chosen all the major details  -- 500 GB SATA hard drive, Intel i5 - 4570, eVGA GT-610-2GB video card, mother board, sound card, etc

 

CPU and motherboard are using already outdated LGA1150 socket, so better to change your details.

 

There is not much you can do whe internet connection is very slow.

 

Any USB dock will do with your hard drives as long as it has proper connector (SATA, PATA etc) that matches connector on your hard drives.



#3 mjd420nova

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Posted 10 April 2016 - 05:14 PM

There are a couple companies that make some 128K modems that work pretty good over some really poor lines.  Even satelite might be an option.  I like when users buy prebuilt, that means it's tested okay.  Many clients assemble the parts and it usually don't work right off.






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