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HDD Health


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#1 pcpunk

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Posted 08 April 2016 - 05:14 PM

Is this where I would post about the outcome of tools like HDD Tune, CrystalDiskMark?  Think my HDD is in bad shape by the results at CrystalDiskMark, but they are quite confusing to someone like me.

 

Thanks, pcpunk


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#2 RolandJS

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Posted 10 April 2016 - 07:04 AM

I'm just a beginner concerning such matters -- please post anything that would help me for sure, and maybe others!  I want to learn from you about usage of the utilities you mentioned  :)


"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

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#3 pcpunk

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Posted 10 April 2016 - 09:35 AM

Thanks RolandJS, I'll post them up here.  In the process of deciding how to fix this with no money lol.  Will have to find some funds for a cheap HDD.  If someone wants different diagnostics done etc. just say the word.  This drive has been slow and know it's old.  The SATA3 was taken out and this SATA1.5 (I think) was put in here: EDIT: I thought this was a downgraded drive, from a SATA3 to a SATA1.5, but now I am looking again and think that I was wrong.

http://www.wdc.com/En/library/sata/2879-701278.pdf

 

This is the Toshiba in my Signature.

 

One of the biggest issues I'm having is slow boot times.  This is a pretty clean install, no malware.  Used autoruns to stop a few Startups etc, and will post whatever is needed.

 

 

9UU44kp.png

And

SjTT2iQ.png

 

And here is the Text outcome:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
CrystalDiskInfo 6.7.5 (C) 2008-2016 hiyohiyo
                                Crystal Dew World : http://crystalmark.info/
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

    OS : Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 [6.1 Build 7601] (x64)
  Date : 2016/04/08 16:46:57

-- Controller Map ----------------------------------------------------------
 - ATA Channel 0 (0) [ATA]
 + ATA Channel 1 (1) [ATA]
   - WDC WD3200BEVT-26ZCT0 ATA Device
 + ATA Channel 2 (2) [ATA]
   - HL-DT-ST DVDRAM GT20N ATA Device
 - ATA Channel 3 (3) [ATA]
 - ATA Channel 4 (4) [ATA]
 - ATA Channel 5 (5) [ATA]
 + Standard AHCI 1.0 Serial ATA Controller [ATA]
   - ATA Channel 0 (0)
   - ATA Channel 1 (1)
   - ATA Channel 2 (2)
   - ATA Channel 3 (3)
   - ATA Channel 4 (4)
   - ATA Channel 5 (5)

-- Disk List ---------------------------------------------------------------
 (1) WDC WD3200BEVT-26ZCT0 : 320.0 GB [0/1/0, pd1] - wd

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
 (1) WDC WD3200BEVT-26ZCT0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
           Model : WDC WD3200BEVT-26ZCT0
        Firmware : 12.01A12
   Serial Number : WD-WXF0E79NT250
       Disk Size : 320.0 GB (8.4/137.4/320.0/320.0)
     Buffer Size : 8192 KB
     Queue Depth : 32
    # of Sectors : 625142448
   Rotation Rate : 5400 RPM
       Interface : Serial ATA
   Major Version : ATA8-ACS
   Minor Version : ----
   Transfer Mode : ---- | SATA/300
  Power On Hours : 3765 hours
  Power On Count : 7713 count
     Temperature : 41 C (105 F)
   Health Status : Caution
        Features : S.M.A.R.T., APM, AAM, 48bit LBA, NCQ
       APM Level : 0080h [ON]
       AAM Level : 80FEh [OFF]

-- S.M.A.R.T. --------------------------------------------------------------
ID Cur Wor Thr RawValues(6) Attribute Name
01 200 200 _51 000000000015 Read Error Rate
03 187 186 _21 000000000659 Spin-Up Time
04 _92 _92 __0 00000000219E Start/Stop Count
05 200 200 140 000000000000 Reallocated Sectors Count
07 100 253 __0 000000000000 Seek Error Rate
09 _95 _95 __0 000000000EB5 Power-On Hours
0A 100 100 _51 000000000000 Spin Retry Count
0B 100 100 __0 000000000000 Recalibration Retries
0C _93 _93 __0 000000001E21 Power Cycle Count
C0 200 200 __0 000000000035 Power-off Retract Count
C1 165 165 __0 00000001A427 Load/Unload Cycle Count
C2 106 _90 __0 000000000029 Temperature
C4 200 200 __0 000000000000 Reallocation Event Count
C5 200 200 __0 000000000004 Current Pending Sector Count
C6 100 253 __0 000000000000 Uncorrectable Sector Count
C7 200 200 __0 000000000000 UltraDMA CRC Error Count
C8 100 253 _51 000000000000 Write Error Rate

-- IDENTIFY_DEVICE ---------------------------------------------------------
        0    1    2    3    4    5    6    7    8    9
000: 427A 3FFF C837 0010 0000 0000 003F 0000 0000 0000
010: 2020 2020 2057 442D 5758 4630 4537 394E 5432 3530
020: 0000 4000 0032 3132 2E30 3141 3132 5744 4320 5744
030: 3332 3030 4245 5654 2D32 365A 4354 3020 2020 2020
040: 2020 2020 2020 2020 2020 2020 2020 8010 0000 2F00
050: 4001 0000 0000 0007 3FFF 0010 003F FC10 00FB 0110
060: FFFF 0FFF 0000 0007 0003 0078 0078 0078 0078 0000
070: 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 001F 0706 0000 004C 0040
080: 01FE 0000 746B 7F09 6163 7469 BC09 6163 207F 0030
090: 0030 0080 FFFE 0000 80FE 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
100: EAB0 2542 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 5001 4EE2
110: ADFA E0A2 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 4010
120: 4010 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0029 0000
130: 0000 0000 0000 169E 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
140: 0000 0000 0004 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
150: 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
160: 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
170: 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
180: 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
190: 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
200: 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 303F 0000 0000 0000
210: 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 1518 0000 0000
220: 0000 0000 100E 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
230: 0000 0000 0000 0000 0001 1000 0000 0000 0000 0000
240: 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
250: 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 10A5

-- SMART_READ_DATA ---------------------------------------------------------
     +0 +1 +2 +3 +4 +5 +6 +7 +8 +9 +A +B +C +D +E +F
000: 10 00 01 2F 00 C8 C8 15 00 00 00 00 00 00 03 27
010: 00 BB BA 59 06 00 00 00 00 00 04 32 00 5C 5C 9E
020: 21 00 00 00 00 00 05 33 00 C8 C8 00 00 00 00 00
030: 00 00 07 2E 00 64 FD 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 09 32
040: 00 5F 5F B5 0E 00 00 00 00 00 0A 33 00 64 64 00
050: 00 00 00 00 00 00 0B 32 00 64 64 00 00 00 00 00
060: 00 00 0C 32 00 5D 5D 21 1E 00 00 00 00 00 C0 32
070: 00 C8 C8 35 00 00 00 00 00 00 C1 32 00 A5 A5 27
080: A4 01 00 00 00 00 C2 22 00 6A 5A 29 00 00 00 00
090: 00 00 C4 32 00 C8 C8 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 C5 32
0A0: 00 C8 C8 04 00 00 00 00 00 00 C6 30 00 64 FD 00
0B0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 C7 32 00 C8 C8 00 00 00 00 00
0C0: 00 00 C8 09 00 64 FD 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
0D0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
0E0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
0F0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
100: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
110: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
120: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
130: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
140: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
150: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
160: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 80 25 01 7B
170: 03 00 01 00 02 71 05 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
180: 00 00 01 04 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
190: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
1A0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
1B0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
1C0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
1D0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
1E0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
1F0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 BF

-- SMART_READ_THRESHOLD ----------------------------------------------------
     +0 +1 +2 +3 +4 +5 +6 +7 +8 +9 +A +B +C +D +E +F
000: 10 00 01 33 C8 C8 C8 C8 00 00 00 00 00 00 03 15
010: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 04 00 00 00 00 00
020: 00 00 00 00 00 00 05 8C 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
030: 00 00 07 00 64 64 64 64 00 00 00 00 00 00 09 00
040: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 0A 33 00 00 00 00
050: 00 00 00 00 00 00 0B 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
060: 00 00 0C 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 C0 00
070: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 C1 00 00 00 00 00
080: 00 00 00 00 00 00 C2 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
090: 00 00 C4 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 C5 00
0A0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 C6 00 00 00 00 00
0B0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 C7 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
0C0: 00 00 C8 33 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
0D0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
0E0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
0F0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
100: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
110: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
120: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
130: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
140: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
150: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
160: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
170: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
180: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
190: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
1A0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
1B0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
1C0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
1D0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
1E0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
1F0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 A7


Edited by pcpunk, 10 April 2016 - 09:37 AM.

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#4 RolandJS

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Posted 10 April 2016 - 01:47 PM

Be careful about the services and startups you stop, lest ye end up like Day After Tomorrow...

"...we'll be fine, as long as the loo doesn't [get stopped up and] overflow..."


"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#5 cat1092

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Posted 11 April 2016 - 12:13 AM

 

 

  Will have to find some funds for a cheap HDD.

 

As low cost as SSD's are, that will likely be better than a 'cheap HDD' & give you a huge boost in performance as well. You'll pay just as much if not more for a like size HDD rather than one larger (say 500GB), a now standard size. That's because 320GB HDD's are no longer a big thing as these once were & that's why they charge more, to have to stock these sizes, and to sell old 'new' stock. You'll still be stuck with the same 8MB cache or buffer, which by today's standards, even the lowest cost notebooks ships with faster drives. 16/32MB cache is typical for today's notebook drives, with some having up to 64MB. 

 

One can get a nice 120-128GB SSD on Newegg on promo beginning at $45, 250-256GB for $79.99 or less. The 'good' brands are Intel, Samsung (other than their 750 EVO line), Crucial & select SanDisk models. Makes a 'cheap' HDD look not so expensive after all. 

 

I have a backup drive with one yellow flag, that was removed from a notebook, otherwise in good health, but also have that drive imaged. Just go easy with the computer, sign up for Newegg promos (if you haven't already), and watch out for any of the first three brands listed in the price ranges I mentioned. Just because the size is smaller doesn't mean it won't fit, using Macrium Reflect, can be cloned. Though I recommend uninstalling what's not needed when the time comes, transferring large files to another drive (or optical media), and sign up for Google Drive (or OneDrive, though less space now), to upload items in a safe place. Then run Disk Cleaner as Administrator, this gets rid of a lot more than the regular Disk Cleanup option, run CCleaner to delete unneeded files such as the Internet cache, disable hibernation (not recommended for SSD's anyway) & delete all except the last Restore Point. Should you get a Samsung SSD, there's software that's basically a 'one click solution' that will optimise it for one out of three choices, plus offer RAPID, which places more accessed files in RAM, where it runs faster, and saves wear & tear on your SSD.

 

Just keep in mind that on some systems, RAPID may cause more issues than it helps, yet is easily disabled. 

 

I choose the maximum capacity Power Plan, because I have no need for hibernation & can still put it in Sleep mode, and hibernation wears a SSD faster. 

 

The main thing is not to panic & don't run off & purchase a 'cheap' HDD when a brand new SSD with a 3 to 5 year warranty is a far better option. You have more than one computer, so use it less until you can replace the drive. That's the advantage on stocking up with as many computers as one can get, especially when free, sometimes one may get an otherwise broken one, yet the drive you may need is just fine. If only I had a dollar for every used drive I moved from one computer to the next, would have enough to put with my new system build stash to make it happen. Plus most of these drives had at least one yellow flag, one can often run for years with just one yellow attribute & never know it, some may appear shortly after purchase of a new computer, or barely after the warranty runs out. To deal that matter out of warranty, I say backup more often. 

 

Which would be my first ever complete system build. While I've renovated many computers out of used/discarded components, have never built one with every component out of new boxes. 

 

Hang on to your cash & don't hand it off to a hustler looking to make $25 on what may be a worse drive than what you have, it'll be the last time you see that person, and your spent cash. Plus used drives (even if purchased on eBay) has a very limited warranty period, and if purchased on the street, no protection at all. You'll find that purchasing quality components the first time is usually the 'cheaper' way to go in the long haul. Purchased my first of 8 SSD's in 2012, back when 128GB Crucial m4's were going for $149-179 on promo, not the first one has any health errors today. 

 

If that's a SATA-3 port you have there, you'll see speeds of up to 500-550MB/sec, with writes usually a little slower than reads, many that's of the 250-256GB size will break the 500MB/sec mark in both reads & writes. With 120-128GB models, one may very well get over 500MB/sec reads, but just around 400MB/sec writes.

 

What will a cheap (even SATA-3 HDD) give you? It'll barely saturate SATA-1 speeds across the entire test, if you're lucky. I don't see how it's legal to label a SATA-3 HDD as such, because I've never seen one break the 160GB mark, they're built cheaper than ever, and the warranties provided shows this to be fact, only the WD 'Black' series carries a 5 year warranty. If they don't believe in their products for more than 2 years, why should we? All it'll take is cut back on a few sodas & burgers, and before you know it, the cash for a SATA-3 SSD will be there. 

 

That's my recommendation, do with it as you wish. :)

 

Good Luck! :thumbup2:

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 12 April 2016 - 03:09 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#6 RolandJS

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Posted 11 April 2016 - 04:19 AM

Download, install, run MiniToolBox and Piriform's Speccy.  Save the logs to your hard-drive.  They may come in handy later if/when you begin to deep-dig into what services and startups are running, what hardware you have, what software has been installed, and so on.  If you want to quick-list what security and monitoring software you are running, maybe we can "spot" something to improve.

Your thread's title is HDD Health, ok, download, install, run the diagnostics software that the computer's manufacturer and/or the internal hard-drive's manufacturer publishes for testing said hard-drive.  Again, keep logs on your hard-drive.


Edited by RolandJS, 11 April 2016 - 04:21 AM.

"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#7 pcpunk

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Posted 11 April 2016 - 06:32 PM

Thanks for all the help guys.  I read every bit of this carefully and will be looking out for a drive as soon as I get a few bucks saved.

 

 

  Will have to find some funds for a cheap HDD.

 

Sorry cat1092, my Terminology is just off.  Was meaning a new drive in general, and we've spoken about SSD's before.  I did look at HDD's just for kicks but after reading all your posts about SSD's AND how cheap they are, will be going that direction.

 

RolandJS, I got all that stuff backed up and ready to make a Clone also, thanks.


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#8 cat1092

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Posted 12 April 2016 - 04:03 AM

pcpunk, glad that you have a plan! :thumbup2:

 

Should you purchase a SSD, then you can get a USB enclosure (metal) for less than $6 on eBay (everything needed is in the package, including cable & leather cover), and convert the 320GiB one into a backup drive that you need, where it'll be used far less. The HDD which shipped with my Toshiba also has one yellow attribute, it was running OK when I upgraded to an SSD, and still is as a backup drive. It's a Hitachi drive, 500GiB, and after successful backup & then clone of the OS, including the Recovery partition (another reason why 250-256GB models are better), nuked the drive with DBAN to remove any personal data left behind, and used a partition tool to format the entire 500GiB (actually just over 460GiB). 

 

Has been used a lot since removal on lesser important computers with only USB 2.0 ports, no problems at all. It's only about half full, so am able to image the contents of it from time to time, when there's been a lot of changes. Such as when I get rid of some computers & add others, though except for my new build that's upcoming, am happy where I'm at. 

 

If possible, you may want to disassemble enough to blow the computer out good, this can reduce a lot of heat, extending the overall life of your computer further. Take a straw or any object to prevent the fan from spinning freely, which isn't good to do, and make sure to give the fins of the heatsink a really good blowing out. This is where a lot of dust gets trapped & therefore, heat can't escape. Some blows it back into the PC, but this is just placing a Band-Aid on a serious issue, the dust still being inside will return. If it's possible, it's good to carefully remove the heatsink & fan assembly, if the fan can be detached, wash the heatsink in hot water & dish detergent, after blowing most of the dust out of the fins, and use rubbing alcohol to clean the CPU surface. 

 

Then use a good brand of thermal paste (though not Arctic Silver Ceramique 2), that stuff is like Locktite or cement, and makes it very hard to repeat the process. Many times, the CPU will lift out with the heatsink & you don't want that, the chance of bending pins are very high. There are other good pastes available at Newegg on promo for less, I use Arctic MX-4, as does many enthusiasts, it's not guaranteed 8 years for nothing. Have removed heatsinks 2-3 years after install with MX-4, and the paste was still quite soft (what you want). MX-2 is also a good option & may cost less. When things aren't urgent, wait for a promo & take the regular shipping, usually free or 99 cents. Be sure after finishing, to place the cap back on securely, most brands will store for a long time. 

 

Only a very small amount of the paste (the size of a very small pea) is required in the center of the CPU & any other place that has it applied (make note or take a picture of the heatsink after removal), and don't manually spread, just lower the heatsink/fan assembly back in place & give a very slight wiggle, this spreads it & after boot will further spread, If there is a soft pad under the heatsink to protect a graphics chip, place it exactly as was before install. The paste is for heat transfer & to make up for imperfections (like scratches) on either the CPU, heatsink or both. One small tube will do all three of your notebooks & a few more. 

 

For the most part, that's what's needed to maintain a computer, and will thank you by providing more years of life. Heat is the bane of all types of electronics, including computers. It doesn't take near the amount of dust buildup for heat to noticeably rise, compared to a desktop PC. 

 

Regardless of the type of drive you run, it'll also run cooler. :)

 

Good Luck!

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#9 pcpunk

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Posted 18 April 2016 - 08:00 PM

After looking over that drive more, even though I don't know what i am looking at, it don't look good.  I think I will just work on getting it to boot up a little faster until I get another drive, it is painfully slow to boot.  I will use the inbuilt tool also like Roland suggested to test the HDD again.  I was going to install another OS etc. to the drive, but now thinking it will be a waste of time.

 

Here is another Thread I started, a bit confusing, but the MiniToolbox output is there and some suggestions by some others.  Maybe need to take a better look at the startup programs, or maybe it is the HDD I don't know.  Here is the link, thanks.

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/607975/slow-updates/


sBCcBvM.png

Created by Mike_Walsh

 

KDE, Ruler of all Distro's

eps2.4_m4ster-s1ave.aes_pcpunk_leavemehere

 


#10 pcpunk

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Posted 06 May 2016 - 06:30 PM

I just ran a Built in W7 Disk Check but cannot access the Log File, can someone help me.  I think it is in C:\Windows\Logs\CBS because there is a File there that was dated the time I ran the test.  It will not open and get the "Access Denied" Error.  It does try to open in Notepad but wont.  This is the source I used for the Test.

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/2641432

 Thanks pcp out!

 

EDIT: Never mind got it!


Edited by pcpunk, 06 May 2016 - 06:54 PM.

sBCcBvM.png

Created by Mike_Walsh

 

KDE, Ruler of all Distro's

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#11 cat1092

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Posted 07 May 2016 - 02:24 AM

pcpunk, you'll get that error with some of these files, I've ran CCleaner (always run analyse first), and these will othen be in Temp or System files, as shown with their app. 

 

Sometimes I can click onto the bunch of files & gain access, other times, will get the same exact error you do. And is likely in a format that only the system's tools can read. That's really all that I can tell you, that you're not alone in this, and I suspect many others has hit this same brick wall. 

 

Though I don't understand the 'why' of this over diagnostic logs. As you seen, the folder will look to be opened, and 'Access Denied' will pop up. 

 

The only solution that I can suggest is to activate the 'hidden' Administrator account, though if the HDD contains the same license (unless this is a clone of the original drive) as one you're running on your new SSD, may cause troubles by opening. Plus if you're no longer running that drive (the old one), there's no point in it. You shouldn't be having these errors on your new drive & as I advised earlier, it's a bad idea to clone a HDD with problems to a SSD (or even a HDD), you're only transferring bad issues to a new drive that will accelerate wear & since it wasn't clean installed to a SSD from the start, is not fully optimized for it, unless you installed the latest Samsung Magician & selected a power plan, which will optimize the install, yet will need to be ran at idle for a few hours. Booting into the BIOS & letting it sit for 8 hours or longer will force an extended garbage collection to take place, which that OS needs (if you're insistent on keeping the install).  The reason why I suspect you've cloned the OS is this quote by you. 

 

 

RolandJS, I got all that stuff backed up and ready to make a Clone also, thanks.

 

 

If this install has been cloned to your SSD, or restored from backup image, the best thing you can do is gather your personal data from the OS, then format & delete the partition. You can then move the other over in that empty space with a partition tool designed for Windows. Mini Tool Partition Wizard has a free bootable CD to handle the job. Be sure to get the correct bit version for your computer, I keep both on hand. 

 

https://www.partitionwizard.com/partition-wizard-bootable-cd.html

 

After moving over, then right click onto the drive (the very left) & select 'Rebuild MBR', there should be a drop down list presented, choose Windows 7/Vista if this shows. Or if you want, you can download EasyBCD 2.3, install it, and delete the no longer used entry. Has many other tools one can use, plus one can dual boot Windows & another brand of OS w/out double booting. 

 

SSD's are great when used with a clean install of Windows, on the other hand one will take a huge performance hit, plus issues as you've described when cloned. All that you've done was moved all of the problematic issues from one drive to another. Not a good way to begin with a SSD, rather than trying to fix things, you should be enjoying the speed instead. :)

 

The only time that I've cloned a HDD to SSD was back when my main PC was less than a month old, and had to first off, disable Fast Boot, Hibernation & System Restore, run Disk Cleanup as Administrator (including deleting Restore points), and ran the defrag app 2-3 times, and shrank the 1TB HDD enough to fit all partitions (took several times with further defrags) that W8 had at the time to fit a 120GB Samsung 840 EVO. And ended up with about 50% of the drive's space free. That's the only way I'll clone a HDD to SSD, or if the system has just been reinstalled. Though it's best to clone all over, and use Mini Tool to make Recovery active & force a reinstall (you showed me this valuable tip :)). 

 

Then the SSD is properly ready, and the only thing that needs checking is partition alignment of each one, beginning with the left side of the scale. If alignment is OK, you'll get a message saying so. Normally if cloning from newer drives, it'll be OK, as these also uses the 4K alignment scheme, as long as the install is W7 or higher. If Vista or lower, this needs to be checked & fixed if not aligned, for best performance & longevity of the drive, regardless of type. 

 

Other modern brands of OS's takes care of this natively during install, though if one desires, can pre-partition first, just ensure that the correct file system is first selected & the partitions are rounded to MiB's, preferably be divided by 4 & have an equal number. For example 60GB (converted to MiB's) divided by 4 will be 15GB converted by MiB's. 

 

There's a lot to this, yet once you learn how to properly run SSD's (the OEM warranty doesn't cover abuse), you'll be OK. :)

 

Just like you're expected to change the oil in a vehicle to keep the warranty in effect, the same principle applies to many products & SSD's are not an exception (you're expected to know how to use & maintain these) & most all of these OEM's includes information (along with software to be installed) with the SSD and there's more information, including updated firmware on their site. Everything that's done with these drives (though not your personal data) are stored in the firmware to determine any issues for RMA purposes, and their techs knows what's going on, some of which is in the SMART data, the rest is hidden in the firmware. While certain brands of backup software (such as, but not limited to, Macrium) will attempt to perform TRIM passes when restoring/cloning, it's not the same as a cleanly installed OS. 

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 07 May 2016 - 02:26 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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