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How to Run Ubuntu on latest Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 14316


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#1 NickAu

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Posted 07 April 2016 - 04:01 PM

 

As reported last week, Microsoft will launch an 'Anniversary Update' for Windows 10 that will bring Ubuntu file system, allowing you to use Bash to run command-line Linux applications without a virtual machine.
 
However, you do not have to wait until this summer to run Bash (Bourne Again Shell) on your Windows 10 OS, as Microsoft has released the first preview build of the Windows 10 Anniversary Update to the members of its Insider program.
 
Don't expect it to run Ubuntu directly on Windows 10, as this is basically Ubuntu user-space packages running natively on Windows 10 by the company coming up with real-time translation of Linux system calls into Windows system calls.
 
 

This new Bash Shell support features a full Ubuntu user space complete with support for tools including ssh, apt, rsync, find, grep, awk, sed, sort, xargs, md5sum, gpg, curl, wget, apache, mysql, python, perl, ruby, php, vim, emacs and more.

Windows 10 build 14316's biggest addition is running native Bash on Ubuntu in Windows 10, and you can install the new preview build to test this feature.
 
Here's How to Run native Bash on Ubuntu on Windows
 
Step 1: Enroll in the Windows Insider program and Select "Advanced Windows Update options" under "System Settings."

http://thehackernews.com/2016/04/how-to-run-ubuntu-on-windows-10.html

 

 

 



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#2 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 07 April 2016 - 04:09 PM

I have been doing this for a couple of days now. Right now I just ran the command

 

apt-get dist-upgrade

 

 

and it is busy installing several features. So far this has been real fun for me but it was very difficult to enable.

 

If anybody else is interested in enabling this feature and are having problems, I can help.


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#3 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 07 April 2016 - 04:13 PM

This is what I see when I enable bash through my Microsoft Command Prompt

 

2016-04-07_15-11-09_zpsiuhj9od3.png


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#4 Guest_GNULINUX_*

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Posted 07 April 2016 - 05:05 PM

Does it mean we can finally run " r m -rf / " on Windows 10 ?  :devil:

 

Disclaimer: Placed an extra (safety) space in the command...

 

Greets!



#5 wizardfromoz

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Posted 07 April 2016 - 05:46 PM

Treading a fine line there, "Peppermint Kid", lol - read here for an idea, Rocky - https://people.rit.edu/cdl8629/409/midterm/rm.php

 

... enter at Linux Terminal "man rm" and have a read.

 

Interesting article, Nick :thumbup2:

 

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#6 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 07 April 2016 - 05:54 PM

Treading a fine line there, "Peppermint Kid", lol - read here for an idea, Rocky - https://people.rit.edu/cdl8629/409/midterm/rm.php

 

... enter at Linux Terminal "man rm" and have a read.

 

Interesting article, Nick :thumbup2:

 

:wizardball: Wizard

I just tried that command and I can see that there are some issues that need to be worked out. While reading the manual, you have to use the keyboard to scroll, the mouse does not work with the BASH manual open. Also, there was no scrolling back up to re-read the page, you have to exit out and then re-open. But it is a work in progress.


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#7 wizardfromoz

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Posted 07 April 2016 - 06:01 PM

 

While reading the manual, you have to use the keyboard to scroll, the mouse does not work with the BASH manual open.

 

No, that happens on a lot of Distros, you are in a good position to check, I think? It's a bit clunky, but for many "man" (manuals), you can find an online alternative, either a web page or a PDF, which are more reader-friendly and can be saved if you wish to add them to your knowledge base.

 

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#8 Guest_GNULINUX_*

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Posted 07 April 2016 - 06:53 PM

Treading a fine line there...

Not really, it's all bluff, see this...

 

"Peppermint Kid"

At my age I'm honored and... my favorite OS scrolls through the man-pages without a problem!  B)

 

 

On topic:

I cannot seem to find one reason for the user to run bash or Linux on Windows 10 ?

 

Greets!



#9 cat1092

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Posted 08 April 2016 - 03:47 AM

 

On topic:

I cannot seem to find one reason for the user to run bash or Linux on Windows 10 ?

 

+1! :thumbup2:

 

Seems like the security would be lowered in doing so, this is not something that a home user (whom cares about their security) would do anyway. This is more likely something for advanced users to code on, not meant to be used as a substitute as a virtual machine, which is much more secure. One can turn off sharing with the host, and vice versa. Some users are going to take this the wrong way, not reading through the details, thinking they're getting a full fledged Ubuntu OS as a desktop app. Microsoft should warn users that this is not what one will get, and that by running both this shell of an OS, plus the actual OS being beta software, comes with substantially more risks than a mere reinstall. 

 

Plus the installing of the beta Anniversary Edition at this point poses a lot of risk. I signed back into the Windows Insider's Program, yet was warned that I may need to reinstall the OS should something go wrong (not once did the site mention to image drive before proceeding). This is Microsoft setting up users for more agony, come on, a warning to image a drive isn't much to ask. :angry:

 

No, they'd rather that one performs up to an entire day's of work to fix what they're releasing w/out promising a smooth transition. Too many are already (as evidenced by the large numbers of Topics on this very forum) not imaging their drives, Microsoft could take this opportunity (& future offers) to show some corporate responsibility in discussing the importance of imaging before pulling the trigger & have pop-up warnings at every stage prior to any upgrades to stop & do so. Backup rates are barely higher than the turn of the Millennium 16 years ago, much of the reason why tech forums are swamped with requests that sometimes we can't fix (example, toasted OEM installs & no recovery media nor backup image). 

 

I immediately signed back out of Insiders, and will likely never go back, chances are, will purchase a couple of 8.1 Pro OEM licenses (since I virtually rebuilt the PC), should be considered as a new one. New MB, CPU, extra SSD & HDD, GPU, optical drive, added new RAM, that's as close to a new build as it gets w/out swapping the case. 8.1 will be supported through 2023, by then, the computer will have more than returned it's investment, and if lives longer, can just install Linux & be done with it. 

 

Upgrading to 10 Pro from 7 Ultimate was only to be able to test the Full UEFI experience of the MB at no cost, now need to grab OEM 8.1 Pro x64. Or see if I can transfer one of my 8.1 Pro w/Media Center promo licenses purchased in 2012, which is permissible. All I have to do is restore the Windows 7 image, remove the COA off the other computer by reinstall of the OEM version of 8 (non-Pro), and should be good to go, both the OS & Media Center keys should activate. Fortunately, with Windows 8.1, Update 1, one can use the media to upgrade the existing OS or clean install by formatting with the install media. 

 

This whole idea just doesn't pass the sniff test with me. :angry:

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 08 April 2016 - 03:49 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#10 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 08 April 2016 - 05:33 AM

For me, being on the beta team of Windows 10 is not a problem. I have all of my programs stored on an external hard drive so if I need to do a clean install it is just a matter of setting up my C drive again. No problem.

 

I do agree about the new Ubuntu system that runs within Windows 10, it is a novelty and I see no practical use for this. I will keep on playing with it to see if I can actually see a practical reason to have Ubuntu exist as an app running in Windows 10, but so far no real practical reason has arisen.

 

It is still fun and I am still messing with it, but so far it seems like a joke.


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#11 mremski

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Posted 08 April 2016 - 07:38 AM

After this "feature" was brought up last week, I poked around a bit more and ran into a bunch of information.

Basically what MS did was implement a "syscall translation layer" and a few other bits needed to run Linux ELF files directly.  Think of it as "Wine in reverse";  Wine fundamentally takes the system calls coming from a Windows executable and translates them into Linux system calls.

 

As for a practical use:

Developers.   There is a lot of development done on *nix systems, lots of young folks come out of schools with knowledge of developing on a *nix system.  They are used to bash, make, vi, a whole bunch of other standard *nix tools.  MS has been losing that desktop market for a while, cost of tools, hw becoming useless with every update of Windows.  Providing the tools native on Windows opens up new user opportunity.

 

The true usefulness of it depends on how far MS wants to take it.  Most *nix programs people use are graphical in nature, that means an X-window environment.  Sure there are X servers for Windows (cygwin comes to mind), but having two things fight for control is bad.  Now if MS is committing to writing/having written all the X libraries as stubs into Windows DLL calls, that would be the ticket.  Then you can start taking your *nix ELF executables copy them to a Windows box and run them directly, bypassing all of the GUI interface in Windows that we "know and love".


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#12 wizardfromoz

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Posted 08 April 2016 - 10:35 PM

Now THAT'S interesting, ta mremski, I understand it a little better now. :thumbup2:

 

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#13 cat1092

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Posted 09 April 2016 - 12:34 AM

For me, being on the beta team of Windows 10 is not a problem.

 

It is still fun and I am still messing with it, but so far it seems like a joke.

 

On the first part, I felt the same, had been running Windows 10 Previews many months (beginning in 2014) prior to the official launch of Windows 10, actually was delighted that as a very early Insider, ended up with a 100% free activated OS in a virtual machine on Linux Mint about 10 days before the latecomers who didn't get an activation w/out an underlying OS. Had I known that's the way it was going to be, would had built a PC & ran the early previews (with some serious searching, this may still be possible) to claim on a real machine. 

 

On the second, I couldn't agree more, it's a late April Fools Joke! :P

 

mremski stated things the best in:

 

 

 

The true usefulness of it depends on how far MS wants to take it. 

 

It won't be very far. Maybe something to sell services down the road, such as Azure subscriptions, or to get more to use Hyper-V. That's the only way one can feel secure with Linux on a MS system, unfortunately, many consumers has had direct access to Hyper-V as opposed to traditional VM's since October 2012 & few have taken advantage, myself included. While I've wanted to, the instructions were so complicated that most home users are scared (or turned) off from the go. 

 

This was also a feature of Windows 7 Ultimate that went even more underutilized (boot to vhd). 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#14 raw

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Posted 09 April 2016 - 01:56 AM

 

Most *nix programs people use are graphical in nature, that means an X-window environment.

 

And most Linux devs use OSX because of the bash environment.

This is what M$ is trying to target. 

I have Cygwin on my Win 8 PC, but it is no where close to what i would

consider a "development environment". 

I suppose it could be, but i find it easier to just use Linux to develop Linux software.


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#15 cat1092

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Posted 09 April 2016 - 02:18 AM

 

 

 but i find it easier to just use Linux to develop Linux software.

 

And to run these also! :thumbup2:

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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