Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Popped Circuit Breaker, Both Computer PSU's Fried?


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 ComputerSmash

ComputerSmash

  • Members
  • 4 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:09:31 AM

Posted 03 April 2016 - 11:58 PM

I made a horrible mistake today and learned that the three DIFFERENT outlets I was using for my two computers and my Microwave shared the same breaker. I never had a problem with it until today. Went to use the microwave and the breaker suddenly flipped.

I turned the power back on, Everything came on fine minus the computer. I thought "No Problem, It never comes back on when the powerfails. I have to turn it on manually!" Well, I went to turn it on and it stayed on for about 5 seconds, Then instantly shutdown. It would then turn on 5 seconds later only to shutdown instantly again 5 seconds after. Nothing displayed.

I started to suspect the PSU because I learned that only one USB port was recieveing power. (Usually, Even if the PC is turned off, All the USB ports still have power).

I removed the PSU, Jumpered the green and black wire to get it to function while out of the PC. I took my Multimeter and begin testing the leads (Orange, Red, Blue, All the colors supposed to carry 3,5, and 12 volts.) No matter which I tested, I was lucky to get 0.50 volts being read on the meter, The Meter was set to read at 20 volts Maximum.

Heres the funny part:

The exact same thing happened to my other POWERED OFF computer. Exact same symptoms With both previously functioning just fine. After I lost power due to the breaker being tripped, None of them would come on longer than 5 seconds. Both would infinitely loop and neither would give a voltage readout greater than .50 volts. Cherry on top? You got it! Both were plugged into surge protectors.


I did not smell anything from the PSU's. Normally, You smell them burn, Right? With what I have said so far, Do you think my PSUs were destroyed, And is it possible they took other components in the computers with them?

Oh, Both PSUs are 80 PLUS Certified. Whatever that means.

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 rqt

rqt

  • Members
  • 366 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:UK
  • Local time:02:31 PM

Posted 04 April 2016 - 02:12 AM

Your PSUs may be destroyed, and they may have taken other components with them. There's no way to know without further testing. I would start by trying both machines with a known good PSU.

#3 ComputerSmash

ComputerSmash
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 4 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:09:31 AM

Posted 04 April 2016 - 10:24 AM

Your PSUs may be destroyed, and they may have taken other components with them. There's no way to know without further testing. I would start by trying both machines with a known good PSU.

Alright. I will purchase a new PSU thursday and let you guys know how it goes. As an update to the PSU, I took it in to have it tested. My 400 Watt PSU on my back up computer is showing that its dead. He said his tested was showing the 600 Watt PSU was still showing up as it was okay. So I jumpered the Green and Black wires, Broke out the Multimeter and tested it again. This time, No wire giving more than 0.01 Volts. Multimeter was set on 20 Volts Maximum.

#4 QQQQ

QQQQ

  • Members
  • 377 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:08:31 AM

Posted 04 April 2016 - 10:40 AM

After a power failure (or circuit reset) it is a good idea to unplug your computer for a full 2 minutes, then try again. Not sure what happens but I have seen this get them powered back on on more than 1 occasion. Years ago I used to work on IBM 5360 systems and after a power failure unplugging the system for 2 full minutes would sometimes get them back up, can't hurt to try, only costs 2 minutes. 



#5 ComputerSmash

ComputerSmash
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 4 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:09:31 AM

Posted 04 April 2016 - 10:44 AM

After a power failure (or circuit reset) it is a good idea to unplug your computer for a full 2 minutes, then try again. Not sure what happens but I have seen this get them powered back on on more than 1 occasion. Years ago I used to work on IBM 5360 systems and after a power failure unplugging the system for 2 full minutes would sometimes get them back up, can't hurt to try, only costs 2 minutes.

Yeah, I did attempt this. Sadly it continued doing the same thing. I even left it unplugged for a day. Then retried the multimeter test. Sadly no luck. I am currently calling the PSU manufacturer to see if the PSU had any safe guards against overvoltage.

#6 RolandJS

RolandJS

  • Members
  • 4,478 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Austin TX metro area
  • Local time:08:31 AM

Posted 04 April 2016 - 11:14 AM

As important as your computers are and your work is -- please purchase a good quality UPS device; that way, you have between 10-20 minutes to do a proper shutdown of all electronics the moment the UPS kicks its battery into play.


"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)

"I heard Spock finally got colander!"  "I believe the word is Kolinahr."  "Oh."


#7 mjd420nova

mjd420nova

  • Members
  • 1,677 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:06:31 AM

Posted 04 April 2016 - 02:18 PM

All electric/electronic devices sold should have their own internal surge protection circuit.  This also a one shot device, it will protect the unit, the things it is powerering, but at the cost of itself.  Replace the power supply.



#8 RolandJS

RolandJS

  • Members
  • 4,478 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Austin TX metro area
  • Local time:08:31 AM

Posted 04 April 2016 - 07:45 PM

A re-settable UPS does not fall on its sword only once, it can protect again and again - if it's a true-blue UPS.


"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)

"I heard Spock finally got colander!"  "I believe the word is Kolinahr."  "Oh."


#9 ComputerSmash

ComputerSmash
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 4 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:09:31 AM

Posted 04 April 2016 - 11:34 PM

I need help choosing a new PSU. My current PSU had the following. Not all of which were used, but most were. If someone could help me choose a new PSU that has the following connector types, Preferarably one that will sacrifice itself to savethe computers components should a surge happen to get it (Or in my case, A popped breaker).

1x 20/24 Connector.
2x 6+2 PCI Express ATX connectors
2x 6 Pin PCI Express ATX connectors.
5x Four Pin MOLEX connectors. (A lot of these were used to power Cooling Fans)
4x Sata Power Connectors
1x 4 + 4 Connectors,Combined together they make an 8 pin connector with rows of 4 stacked on top of each other.

Sorry for the odd descriptions. I do not know the names of the connectors.

Edited by ComputerSmash, 04 April 2016 - 11:35 PM.


#10 RolandJS

RolandJS

  • Members
  • 4,478 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Austin TX metro area
  • Local time:08:31 AM

Posted 05 April 2016 - 02:55 AM

As important as your computers are and your work is -- please purchase a good quality UPS device; that way, you have between 10-20 minutes to do a proper shutdown of all electronics the moment the UPS kicks its battery into play.

Wifey and I have done this for our computer center and the "TV & vhs/dvd combo complex."  However, your call   :)


"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)

"I heard Spock finally got colander!"  "I believe the word is Kolinahr."  "Oh."


#11 dc3

dc3

    Bleeping Treehugger


  • Members
  • 30,265 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sierra Foothills of Northern Ca.
  • Local time:06:31 AM

Posted 05 April 2016 - 12:12 PM

Where were you taking the voltage readings?

 

From a SATA or Molex power connector?

 

I'm guessing that you are located in the U.S.  If you are not and the line voltage is 220V don't use the instructions below.

 

If these receptacles are the three prong type they will have a neutral, line voltage, and a ground.  Looking at the receptacle the slot on the left is the neutral, the one on the right  is the line voltage, the round hole below and centered between the to slots is the ground.  

 

Set you voltmeter to a AC scale which will read up to 230V, you shouldn't see a voltage any higher than 110 - 120 volts.

 

Insert one probe (this is alternating voltage so it doesn't matter which probe you use) in the ground, then insert the other probe in the neutral side and then the line voltage side.  You should only get a voltage reading between the ground and line voltage and between the neutral and live voltage.  If you get voltage between the ground and the neutral it means the receptacle has been wired out of phase.  This can create problems with grounded devices.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users