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How Much Does It Cost To Run My Computer?


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8 replies to this topic

#1 Qas

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Posted 03 August 2006 - 10:36 AM

Hello i just want to find out how much it cost to run my PC. The input of the psu is 230V output is 350W. Im with EDF energy the cost is:

REGION First 900 kWh per annum* All other kWh
Ex VAT Inc VAT Ex VAT Inc VAT
LONDON 14.99p 15.74p 9.14p 9.60p


THANKS A MILLION!

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#2 Albert Frankenstein

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Posted 03 August 2006 - 10:41 AM

There is NO way of knowing for sure, NO formula for calculating for sure. But from estimates that I have read, the average computer and monitor cost $17 USD per month, or 2.5 cents per hour. Approx 150 watts per hour.

This cost could vary wildly depending upon usage and power saving settings.
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#3 Mr Alpha

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Posted 03 August 2006 - 11:53 AM

The PSU output is not constant but varies as the load of the computer varies. Then you have to factor in the efficiency of the PSU which varies depending on the load the PSU is under. Add to that that you presumably got a monitor, speakers, a modem, maybe a router, possibly a printer and so on, which also eat varying amounts of power. The you have to factor in the temperature in which all of this operates as that will impact their efficiency and so increase the power draw. Of course you can't forget the biggest factor, how you use the computer: What you do with it, when and how you leave all that stuff on and so so.

What you have to do if you want to find out is this: Get a watt meter and plug in in between the wall socket and the computer/monitor/modem/speakers. With the help of it you can tell how much power you've used in a month.
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#4 Qas

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Posted 03 August 2006 - 07:30 PM

cant be asked now. Had an argument with my dad now i cant leave the computer on all night. I was planing to do alot of downloading

#5 ddeerrff

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Posted 03 August 2006 - 09:54 PM

As long as you turn the monitor off (you don't need that on for downloading), the cost should be no more than leaving a couple of 100 watt lights on. Figure .2 - .25 KWHrs/Hr.
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#6 dc3

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Posted 03 August 2006 - 10:45 PM

One variable that wasn't mentioned previously is the fact that your computer and monitor will hibernate when they are inactive. It will continue to use a small amount of electricity.

There is a procuts call Kill A Watt that plugs into the receptacle, and you computer plugs into it and reads watts, or kilowatts.

http://www.safehomeproducts.com/shp2/sm/el...ity_monitor.asp

Once you have the kilowatts that you use just multiply that times your local kilowatt per hour figure.

Yes, a computer can be left unattended for long periods of time, but if it isn't working at folding or something useful, why leave it on? Every device in your house that has a low voltage control, LCD, or LED display is constantly using a small amount of electricity which adds up. Even you TV, you're probalby way too young to remember waiting for the TV to warm up, now days it pops on in an instant, that's because it never really turns off. It all adds up.

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#7 DJBPace07

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Posted 03 August 2006 - 10:54 PM

A computer or monitor (and many other household electronics) use about 40% of their normal power in stand-by mode. If you need to leave your computer on for downloading, turn on a distributed computing program so all those unused computer processes don't go to waste, there are several available such as Seti@Home, Folding@Home, D2OL (personal favorite), and FightAIDS@Home just to name a few. But just leaving it on doing nothing isn't a good thing to do.

Edited by DJBPace07, 03 August 2006 - 10:58 PM.

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#8 Mr Alpha

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Posted 04 August 2006 - 05:34 AM

If you need to leave your computer on for downloading, turn on a distributed computing program so all those unused computer processes don't go to waste, there are several available such as Seti@Home, Folding@Home, D2OL (personal favorite), and FightAIDS@Home just to name a few. But just leaving it on doing nothing isn't a good thing to do.

Wasn't he after using as little power as possible? Those distributed computing programs leaves the computer running at full eating bucketloads of power. Shouldn't he have as little running as possible so he can take maximum usage out of power management features, like Cool & Quiet?
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#9 DJBPace07

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Posted 04 August 2006 - 05:49 PM

Some computer systems don't have power management features, especially if they are several years old. The computer is on anyway and all of the components are running, often with no power throttling. The amount of power being drawn by distributed computing programs is small; some dist. computing programs allow the user to set the amount of processing power they use. The user can simply set this low to maximize on energy efficiency if they want to save a little.

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