Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Is it OK to upgrade yet to Windows 10


  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 jonnyD

jonnyD

  • Members
  • 13 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:05:15 AM

Posted 31 March 2016 - 11:49 PM

My daughter had a laptop with Windows 7 Home on it and did the free upgrade to Windows 10 when it first came out. There were problems (don't remember what they were) so we reverted to Windows 7 again.

 

My current PC has Windows 7 Pro 64-bit. I left the room tonight for a few hours with the computer on. When I returned, Microsoft had initiated the upgrade to Windows 10 without my permission (I'm assuming there was probably a message giving me a certain time to opt out before the install). So I declined the agreement and it took a few minutes to change my system back to Windows 7.

 

Should I be fearful to upgrade after all this time? Have most of the bugs been ironed out? Are there any advantages/disadvantages to using Windows 7 vs Windows 10? I'm happy with my PC's current performance.



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 Foldingchair

Foldingchair

  • Members
  • 109 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Netherlands
  • Local time:10:15 AM

Posted 01 April 2016 - 06:15 AM

I'm running Windows 10 64 bit Pro on my main computer and laptop, and it runs just fine. In my opinion, it's a very nice OS. A bit of getting used to, coming from Windows 7, but it's very nice to work with.

 

Honestly, I would say that if you, or anyone else in your household depends on the mentioned computer and it's running just fine, you shouldn't upgrade unless you really want Windows 10. Even then, if you do decide to get Windows 10 I advise against upgrading. While it works, it's never as clean as a clean install (which obviously would require purchasing a license). For most people upgrading should suffice though.

 

The bottom line is: Yes, Windows 10 is satisfactory enough to upgrade/install without any issues (it went smooth for me, and I've done so six times just to experiment with things), but unless you're really itching for Windows 10 or your current install is kept together by duct tape so to say (like it was in my case), I wouldn't bother upgrading at all. There's always things that can go wrong, and while Windows 10 is solid to me, it may not be for you.


"Peace and blessings be upon you all."


#3 jonnyD

jonnyD
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 13 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:05:15 AM

Posted 01 April 2016 - 10:20 AM

I found out that we have until July 16 for a free upgrade to Windows 10. My concern now is that Microsoft is going to continually try to do the upgrade when I step away from my computer with it on. It happened again this morning  :nono:



#4 garioch7

garioch7

    RCMP Veteran


  • Malware Response Instructor
  • 3,729 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Port Hood, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • Local time:06:15 AM

Posted 01 April 2016 - 10:42 AM

Just a point of clarification:

 

While it works, it's never as clean as a clean install (which obviously would require purchasing a license).

 

I upgraded from Windows 7 x64 Pro to Windows 10 x64 Pro on my main computer and I upgraded my laptop from Windows 7 x64 Home to Windows 10 x64 Home via a clean install at no charge.  You can do a clean install for no cost using the Windows 10 Media Creation Tool available here, providing that you are running Windows 7 SP1 or Windows 8.1, which are eligible for the free upgrade to Windows 10 until July 2016.

 

I recommend "upgrading" via a Clean Install so that you don't "transfer" junk from your old Windows 7 configuration.  The "Clean Install" takes longer, obviously, because you have to reinstall all of your programs and transfer your data files back after the upgrade to WinX.  There are far fewer problems being reported by the users that "upgraded"  to WinX via Clean Install.

 

Just my two cents.  Have a great day.

 

Regards,

-Phil


Member of the Unified Network of Instructors and Trusted Eliminators


#5 rp88

rp88

  • Members
  • 3,016 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:09:15 AM

Posted 01 April 2016 - 02:05 PM

If you want help keeping windows 7 running and avoiding upgrade I can advise, it's a matter of removing certain KB updates and changing a few settings. If you want to stay with 7 you don't have to put up with windows 10 constantly trying to push you onto it, there are plenty of us who don't want to upgrade, together we can find ways to keep our computers as we like them.

 

The key to preventing upgrade is removal of KB3035583, KB2976978 and several other KB updates (I'll list them all if you want further help).

 

Then you have to set updates so they check but don't download without your approval, in future you'll never install any update that isn't a security update or bug fix.

 

After that there's some cleaning up to do, getting gwx traces off your system and removing any folders containing background downloaded windows 10 installer files.

 

You can then do some registry tweaks, VERY carefully, and you may wish to install a program called gwx control panel.

 

If you want to do this, I'll happily explain the rest of the details.


Edited by rp88, 01 April 2016 - 02:05 PM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#6 Rocky Bennett

Rocky Bennett

  • Members
  • 2,668 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Mexico, USA
  • Local time:03:15 AM

Posted 01 April 2016 - 03:08 PM

I'm running Windows 10 64 bit Pro on my main computer and laptop, and it runs just fine. In my opinion, it's a very nice OS. A bit of getting used to, coming from Windows 7, but it's very nice to work with.

 

Honestly, I would say that if you, or anyone else in your household depends on the mentioned computer and it's running just fine, you shouldn't upgrade unless you really want Windows 10. Even then, if you do decide to get Windows 10 I advise against upgrading. While it works, it's never as clean as a clean install (which obviously would require purchasing a license). For most people upgrading should suffice though.

 

The bottom line is: Yes, Windows 10 is satisfactory enough to upgrade/install without any issues (it went smooth for me, and I've done so six times just to experiment with things), but unless you're really itching for Windows 10 or your current install is kept together by duct tape so to say (like it was in my case), I wouldn't bother upgrading at all. There's always things that can go wrong, and while Windows 10 is solid to me, it may not be for you.

 

 

It would NOT require purchasing a license to do a clean install.


594965_zpsp5exvyzm.png


#7 usasma

usasma

    Still visually handicapped (avatar is memory developed by my Dad


  • BSOD Kernel Dump Expert
  • 25,091 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Southeastern CT, USA
  • Local time:05:15 AM

Posted 03 April 2016 - 05:14 AM

If you're concerned about losing the free upgrade:

- get W7 recovery media

- backup your data

- update to W10

- activate W10 online

- run this command from a command prompt "slmgr /xpr"

if it says "permanently activated" then that hardware is permanently activated for W10

- then use the W7 recovery media to reinstall W7


My browser caused a flood of traffic, sio my IP address was banned. Hope to fix it soon. Will get back to posting as soon as Im able.

- John  (my website: http://www.carrona.org/ )**If you need a more detailed explanation, please ask for it. I have the Knack. **  If I haven't replied in 48 hours, please send me a message. My eye problems have recently increased and I'm having difficult reading posts. (23 Nov 2017)FYI - I am completely blind in the right eye and ~30% blind in the left eye.<p>If the eye problems get worse suddenly, I may not be able to respond.If that's the case and help is needed, please PM a staff member for assistance.

#8 jonnyD

jonnyD
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 13 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:05:15 AM

Posted 03 April 2016 - 12:21 PM

if it says "permanently activated" then that hardware is permanently activated for W10

- then use the W7 recovery media to reinstall W7

Is there a way also to get recovery media for W10 so that after following your suggestion and I revert to W7, if I want to change back to W10 I can do so even after the July 16th deadline with my free upgrade?



#9 jonnyD

jonnyD
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 13 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:05:15 AM

Posted 03 April 2016 - 12:24 PM

 there are plenty of us who don't want to upgrade, together we can find ways to keep our computers as we like them.

 

I'm interested to hear your feedback on why you do not want to switch to W10 at this time and stay with W7.



#10 Rocky Bennett

Rocky Bennett

  • Members
  • 2,668 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Mexico, USA
  • Local time:03:15 AM

Posted 03 April 2016 - 03:59 PM

 

if it says "permanently activated" then that hardware is permanently activated for W10

- then use the W7 recovery media to reinstall W7

Is there a way also to get recovery media for W10 so that after following your suggestion and I revert to W7, if I want to change back to W10 I can do so even after the July 16th deadline with my free upgrade?

 

 

 

Yes, download a Windows 10 ISO or keep a Macrium image of your Windows 10 system on a separate drive.


594965_zpsp5exvyzm.png


#11 Wolverine 7

Wolverine 7

  • Members
  • 746 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bournemouth,UK
  • Local time:09:15 AM

Posted 03 April 2016 - 04:06 PM

I'm interested to hear your feedback on why you do not want to switch to W10 at this time and stay with W7.

 

I have two 7s and an upgraded 10,all in all i still prefer 7..Good things about 10...it runs fast,good for gaming.

 

Bad things.

 

http://itvision.altervista.org/why-windows-10-sucks.html



#12 usasma

usasma

    Still visually handicapped (avatar is memory developed by my Dad


  • BSOD Kernel Dump Expert
  • 25,091 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Southeastern CT, USA
  • Local time:05:15 AM

Posted 03 April 2016 - 06:12 PM

 

if it says "permanently activated" then that hardware is permanently activated for W10

- then use the W7 recovery media to reinstall W7

Is there a way also to get recovery media for W10 so that after following your suggestion and I revert to W7, if I want to change back to W10 I can do so even after the July 16th deadline with my free upgrade?

 

W10 media creation tool and the ISO for W10 here (free from Microsoft): https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows10


Edited by usasma, 03 April 2016 - 06:12 PM.

My browser caused a flood of traffic, sio my IP address was banned. Hope to fix it soon. Will get back to posting as soon as Im able.

- John  (my website: http://www.carrona.org/ )**If you need a more detailed explanation, please ask for it. I have the Knack. **  If I haven't replied in 48 hours, please send me a message. My eye problems have recently increased and I'm having difficult reading posts. (23 Nov 2017)FYI - I am completely blind in the right eye and ~30% blind in the left eye.<p>If the eye problems get worse suddenly, I may not be able to respond.If that's the case and help is needed, please PM a staff member for assistance.

#13 Foldingchair

Foldingchair

  • Members
  • 109 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Netherlands
  • Local time:10:15 AM

Posted 11 April 2016 - 12:54 PM

I'm running Windows 10 64 bit Pro on my main computer and laptop, and it runs just fine. In my opinion, it's a very nice OS. A bit of getting used to, coming from Windows 7, but it's very nice to work with.

 

Honestly, I would say that if you, or anyone else in your household depends on the mentioned computer and it's running just fine, you shouldn't upgrade unless you really want Windows 10. Even then, if you do decide to get Windows 10 I advise against upgrading. While it works, it's never as clean as a clean install (which obviously would require purchasing a license). For most people upgrading should suffice though.

 

The bottom line is: Yes, Windows 10 is satisfactory enough to upgrade/install without any issues (it went smooth for me, and I've done so six times just to experiment with things), but unless you're really itching for Windows 10 or your current install is kept together by duct tape so to say (like it was in my case), I wouldn't bother upgrading at all. There's always things that can go wrong, and while Windows 10 is solid to me, it may not be for you.

 

As it turns out, doing a clean install with the existing product key you have for Windows 7 didn't work for me because of... Reasons. I should've mentioned that you obviously can just use your existing product key if you have one. Not sure why I can't just edit some posts more than once, but... Whatever, I suppose.


Edited by Foldingchair, 11 April 2016 - 12:54 PM.

"Peace and blessings be upon you all."


#14 dustyjay

dustyjay

  • Members
  • 13 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Yelm Washington
  • Local time:02:15 AM

Posted 12 April 2016 - 12:15 AM

Before proceeding with the Uprade (Either in-place upgrade or Clean Install) I would suggest going to the suppport page for your computer to see if it has been tested for win 10 and there are drivers available for win 10.  If it hasn't been tested or there are no win 10 drivers, that doesn't mean it won't work, it just means that the manucaturer has not tested it or has decided not to support win 10 by making drivers available for you computer for Win 10.  Though Win 10 itself may have some of the drivers you need native in win 10, there is no sure way to tell in advance if it is going to work, only work partially (certain hardware like wireless adapters not working, etc.....) making you in fact a Beta tester for Win 10 where your computer is concerned.  If you decide to go ahead with the Upgrade anyway, make sure you have a way of restoring your computer to its original state (Make a back up Image of your HDD).






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users