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New Server advice


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#1 Micallen

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Posted 29 March 2016 - 08:00 AM

We have a small business (22 ppl) and currently have a Windows server (SBS2011).  The server is getting some age (4+ years) and is slow at times.  The engineering dept uses SolidWorks (3D design software) and all the files are located on the server. Opening and saving large assembly files is slow at times.  Our electrical software requires SQL server.  

 

I'm looking at replacing the server.  I assumed SBS 2012 would be the way to go (Server 2016 seems a bit scary).  Talking to some others, they say SBS has become too unreliable.  I really prefer the Windows platform.  I know nothing about Linux or any other OS for that matter.  And the next server will need SQL server on it,

 

I'm not opposed to having backups in the cloud, but not fond of everything being cloud-based.

 

So whats the norm these days for new server setups?


Edited by Micallen, 29 March 2016 - 08:01 AM.

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#2 JohnnyJammer

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Posted 29 March 2016 - 06:05 PM

First question would be what cost are they looking at spending?

Maybe something like so http://shop.lenovo.com/us/en/systems/servers/racks/systemx/x3650-m5/

Also HP has some good Proliant servers but do you want rack mount servers or free standing?

 

Also if you fill the server/servers (I would advise 2 servers for replication and fault tolerance) with HDD's, would a NAS suffice for backups incase of disaster?

 

Maybe even one server with VMWare ESXi 5.*, then have 2 servers hosted virtually and backup, replicate to a second server using Veeam.


Edited by JohnnyJammer, 29 March 2016 - 06:06 PM.


#3 Micallen

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Posted 30 March 2016 - 11:55 AM

I was hoping to stay under $5000 (including software and licensing).  

Looking for a free-standing,

 

I have found 1TB SSD drives for $430.  But the options when configuring a server are VERY different in price. 

 

I would like a CPU that is at or around 10,000 Passmark score (E3-1231 v3 or E3-1271 v3 for example).

 

I was looking at free standing servers on the Lenovo link you sent, and things look OK until I start adding RAID HD's.  Then it jumps up quickly.


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#4 Sneakycyber

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Posted 31 March 2016 - 12:51 PM

Also note the SBS line has ended. Server 2012 Essentials (Soon to be Server 2016 Essentials) would be the equivalent and it no longer includes Exchange.  Also for Server 2012 Essentials you would need the Premium add on for SQL.


Edited by Sneakycyber, 31 March 2016 - 12:53 PM.

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#5 Robotiko_180

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Posted 03 April 2016 - 06:06 AM

Running a Mac Server like an X-Serve with a Mac x-serve NAS that holds up to 14 SSD's you can partition them and run them side by side....also you really need to have two of everything in the server worlds....incase one goes down you won't be dead in the water the other server keeps your network up and going while you fix the other and then you copy the fixed servers SSD drives and update them on what they missed while the other has been running....and run them side by side again.....also helps on getting lag...they can work together to serve your clients and do print jobs updating and so on....linux is the best to run....they don't need much Maintenance like Windows does....I have some older servers for sell....and one X-Serve....Mac is easy to do it is window based for all the command liners that don't know much command Line at all...Linux is ALL COMMAND LINE......Windows wants to  much for there software.....for all the work it creates...

You will pay more for a Mac Server but...you get what you pay for sometimes....I have one, wish it was a quad core instead of a duel core...has PPB Processors not the Intel Xeon Processors I want....Look at the 2009, 2010 Mac Servers has 4 hot swap HDD Bays you can add a raid card with them if you like Raid! They have two 6 core processors running side by side in some of them for a 12 core server and 32GBs of memory in them also...you can buy them used on Ebay or call the oldest Mac store that is in California in the Silicone Valley...the first and oldest Mac shop....they have anything you want...I don't know about prices I have not dealt with them like that...but have called to see if they had an item....and sure enough they would have the item. (Motherboards Processors and so on...)Mac has its own Server program that is run like windows or from Command Line....(Like Linux Command Lines).If you are good at Linux you can run older servers with fast SSD HD's lots of memory into them....(32GB's or more 128GB's) Raid 0 is faster than a mirrored raid 1....so how you set it up matters also....VM (Virtual Machine) to do maintenance helps also, you won't even have to reboot or shutdown to do so...Macs will not defrag the HD's while the OS is loaded....you have to log off the OS to do it....a VM is a good way to do it. So you don't have to re-boot into a different OS on a different Partition...(Duel Boot).






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