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Installed Ram, and SSD


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#1 beachfeet

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Posted 27 March 2016 - 05:27 PM

Good afternoon,

Does anyone know if there are any risks involved, by only having 4 GB of memory, alongside a SSD, on a machine running Ubuntu 14.04? This is the first SSD that I have owned. There are times when doing research for hardware/operating system compatibility can become confusing. I know that 4 GB of ram, works well with the hardware requirements to run Ubuntu 14.04, but I have come across various articles, and pages with the authors stating that one needs to install 8-16 GB of Ram, when running the OS, off of a SSD.  Could you please offer your input?

Thank you.



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#2 Captain_Chicken

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Posted 27 March 2016 - 05:32 PM

64bit or 32bit ubuntu?

4GB is more than enough for both 64bit and 32bit ubuntu. 32bit only supports 4GB or less of ram. There should be no issues.


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#3 beachfeet

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Posted 27 March 2016 - 05:36 PM

X64. I am not exactly sure why these authors suggested at least 8-16 GB, when an SSD is installed. I just wanted to clarify, and thank you for the reply.



#4 Guest_hollowface_*

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Posted 27 March 2016 - 06:22 PM

pages with the authors stating that one needs to install 8-16 GB of Ram, when running the OS, off of a SSD.
-REF:http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/609149/installed-ram-and-ssd/#entry3966831

Probably because most people don't put a swap partition on their SSD, and since placing it on a harddrive would degrade performance, it's common to simply not have one. If you want your computer to perform nicely, this of course means, you must have enough RAM to meet your memory needs (something which one should be doing regardless of having an SSD or a harddrive), because you don't have a swap partition to use as a crutch. Ignore the 8-16GiB recommendation. That is just what is considered a normal amount of ram these days. What actually matters in computing is that you have enough ram to meet your usage needs. So, if your system runs smooth under your usage, and isn't constantly agressively dumping things out of memory to make needed room, then you have enough RAM for your needs.

There is no memory requirement to use an SSD.

#5 cat1092

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Posted 28 March 2016 - 02:37 AM

 

 

There is no memory requirement to use an SSD. 

 

hollowface, great call!

 

This is correct, and it's also best as well run a 64 bit OS to utilize the 64 bit CPU's security features, otherwise, these are going to waste. 64 bit CPU's has security features that 32 bit OS's cannot utilize, including browsers, which on a Linux OS, are also 64 bit.

 

While it's true at today's pricing that having an 8GB RAM set instead of 4GB will lessen the writes to the drive, and may under some conditions make it more snappy, there's no mandatory upgrade of the RAM required, However I do recommend to run a 64 bit OS on the computer for obvious reasons. Another is that you're not locked out of 3rd party browsers, such as Google Chrome, and I have little doubt that the locking down of more 32 bit software is coming, and it's not just a Linux issue. 

 

It's coming to a point where 32 bit developers of all types are going to have to rethink their game plan soon, or face becoming unemployed. Including those working on OS & browser projects, this is as good time as any to request transfer to the 64 bit dev team, where there's a lot more life, and assistance is needed the most. Today, corporations are wasting cash on the upkeep of 32 bit anything, unless it's critical mission software that can't be let go of (examples are those in the medical field) at this time, until stable 64 bit replacements are in place. 

 

The first 64 bit CPU releases began over a decade ago, and it's been nearly 7 years since the 64 bit era has been locked into place (excluding the short lived netbook experiment), and finally time to get in tunes with the times. Those who are running 32 bit OS's on 64 bit hardware are also missing out on performance, even those with only 2GB RAM & a 64 bit computer will see improved performance, Linux OS's are designed different from Windows, many will idle on under 600MiB RAM, and in real world usage, will rarely hit the 4GiB mark, many won't even hit 2GiB unless there are 15+ pages open. 

 

A SSD is the best 'bang for the buck' today, paired with a 64 bit OS. 

 

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Edited by cat1092, 28 March 2016 - 02:42 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#6 NickAu

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Posted 28 March 2016 - 03:46 PM

 

I am not exactly sure why these authors suggested at least 8-16 GB, when an SSD is installed.

Possibly to run virtual machines.



#7 beachfeet

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Posted 28 March 2016 - 08:02 PM

Thank you everyone, for all of the great detailed replies!



#8 cat1092

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Posted 30 March 2016 - 03:32 AM

X64. I am not exactly sure why these authors suggested at least 8-16 GB, when an SSD is installed. I just wanted to clarify, and thank you for the reply.

 

As my colleague Nick point out, the usage of Virtual Machine software requires more than the standard 4GB, which will be otherwise fine for a Linux 64 bit OS. Most VM's will require at least 3GB RAM to feel like a real one, and there's other settings that needs changing for best result. 

 

While mine's the exception & not the rule, one of my Windows VM's on Linux Mint has 8GB RAM (once had 12GB RAM) & 4 CPU cores. It is necessary? No, but I want it to perform better than a physical machine, and gets it done quite well. :thumbup2:

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 30 March 2016 - 03:35 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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