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HP printer - will ink cartridge removal cause error?


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#1 NotionCommotion

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Posted 26 March 2016 - 07:15 PM

I have a HP Officejet Pro 8600 Plus e-All-in-One Printer - N911g.  Ran out of ink.  Wife bought new HP cartridges.  Put them in, but might have not solidly put them all in.  Printer said something like "Your yellow one is damaged".  Took them out and put them in.  Now printer says "There is a problem with the printer or ink system.  Turn printer off, then on.  If problem persists, contact HP".

 

Contacted HP, but no reply.

 

Went to buy new printer, and sales guy said the ink cartridges have a chip to detect if they have been removed and reinserted to prevent people from refilling.

 

Could the printer be okay, but just HP trying to make me by more cartridges?  Any other thoughts?

 

Thanks!



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#2 MoxieMomma

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Posted 26 March 2016 - 07:28 PM

Could the printer be okay, but just HP trying to make me by more cartridges?  Any other thoughts?

 
I have a similar HP AIO and have never experienced that.
I suppose it's possible, but I've never tried to remove and then reinsert a cartridge.
(I think they DO have chip or PCB, but I don't know about that "refill" story - it sort of sounds as if salesman was looking to make a little $$.)
 
Having said that, I always use only genuine HP ink (they have an online ordering service that is cheap, fast and reliable; ink from big-box and other retailers is often old/stale/outdated). And I do not use refills or after-market or generic -- over the long term, they do not save $, but cause aggravation and lousy printing.

If the printer is under warranty (and even if it's not), I've always had excellent luck with their phone tech support.
It is the Easter weekend, so coverage might be sparse.
 
They have a support page HERE, and a forum, but I've always had better luck with phone support.

 

>>>What happens if you install a NEW cartridge?????<<<

 

Having said ALL of that, your post confuses me, as it sounds as if you bought a new PRINTER, rather than just shelling out for a new INK CARTRIDGE????

Surely I misunderstood something??

 

MM



#3 NotionCommotion

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Posted 26 March 2016 - 07:40 PM

Thanks MM,  I bought a new printer (HP 8625), but it still in the box.  Didn't cost much more than the cartridges!  Guess I should try returning the recently purchased and never used ink cartridges but opened, buying new ones, and trying those?



#4 MoxieMomma

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Posted 26 March 2016 - 08:09 PM

Hi:

 

Yes, it is true, the manufacturers make their money from the ink/toner, not from the hardware.

(I've got an old Officejet 7400 Series AIO from 2005 that I use a backup. So the hardware has been pretty good.)

 

But as I mentioned, cheap ink has always been a "pay me now, pay me later" deal. I don't do it.

 

But I'm still a bit confused about your situation.

You didn't mention the warranty status, or if the ink cartridges you have been using are HP or generic/after-market, new or refill.

 

If the 8600 is under warranty, I would:

  1. Install new, HP ink (perhaps all 4, but at least the one that caused issue) as first step (~$25 for a standard size genuine 951 yellow cartridge)
  2. If that doesn't work, pursue warranty repair/replacement with HP.
    1. If you have been using generic/after-market ink, it *may* have voided the warranty, but I'm not sure.
    2. In the past, for the few times I've needed it, I've had them walk me through minor tech things over the phone; they've been quite good.

If the 8600 is NOT under warranty, I would still:

  1. Try new, HP ink first;
  2. If that doesn't work, I would consider purchasing a new printer, IF you think the cost:benefit ratio is more favorable than pursuing out-of-warranty repair.

That is not the only way to slice it, but that is how I would proceed, based on the info provided.

 

Let us know how it works out, so that we can all learn.

 

Cheers,

MM


Edited by MoxieMomma, 26 March 2016 - 08:10 PM.


#5 NotionCommotion

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Posted 26 March 2016 - 08:43 PM

Thanks MM,

 

Warranty status:  I don't know.  Purchased a year or two ago, but don't think I still have receipts.

 

Cartridges:  Only new HP, and never generic/after-market or refill.  The ones I installed were brand new HP cartridges.

 

How do I know if it is still under warranty?  Should I really re-buy brand new certified HP cartridges?



#6 MoxieMomma

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Posted 27 March 2016 - 06:32 AM

Hi:

 

Warranty:

Read the documentation that came with the printer. IIRC the standard warranty is one-year. But they typically offer extended warranties. You would have to check the paperwork, including the receipt from the place where you bought it.

EDIT: You can also provide the model # and Serial # to HP via phone or web, and they will tell you the warranty status.

If it is only a year or so old, it might still be covered, or it might still be feasible to tack on an extension.

That might still be cheaper than buying a new printer.

 

Ink:

If you got an error installing an ink cartridge, the first logical step to troubleshoot would be to try another cartridge, in the off chance that the first one was defective.

If you get the same error with a new, different cartridge, then it would probably narrow down the source of the problem to the printer itself.

That seems like the easiest thing to try, before buying and setting up a new printer??

 

As I mentioned, I just presented suggestions for how I would approach this.

If the printer is new/newer, I would try to determine the cause of the problem (perhaps just a faulty ink cartridge) first.

If it's just the cartridge, then you are all set.

If is is the printer itself, then I would probably try to repair it, IF it is under warranty and can be done "easily".

If the printer is "broken" and out of warranty, then it's up to you whether to repair or replace it.

 

I use my AIO with wired and wireless printing on multiple computers, as well as landline FAX and digital answering machine.

While it's not the end of the world to install and configure a brand new printer/fax for all those systems (and HP phone support is great help), I would try to salvage the existing printer before tossing it out and starting over.

Time, effort, $$...

 

It's certainly up to you, though.

 

Cheers,


Edited by MoxieMomma, 27 March 2016 - 06:37 AM.


#7 NotionCommotion

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Posted 27 March 2016 - 05:06 PM

Returned the cartridges and bought new ones.  All works!  Thanks!



#8 MoxieMomma

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Posted 27 March 2016 - 06:17 PM

That's great!

 

I'm glad you were able to resolve your issue.

 

Thanks for taking the time to let us know.

 

Cheers,

MM



#9 mjd420nova

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Posted 27 March 2016 - 06:37 PM

This has been a real problem for some, but it just takes and extra cartridge to get things going again.  I refill my cartridges and re0use them, but you have to have a new cartridge to put in place if only to print one page, then back to the refill.  It doesn't remember past the last cartridge installed.  It just knows that you removed one that was low warning and once removed, it won't go right back in.  I save some photo printouts for the swap out, when the unit says ink is low, I put in new cartridges (just for photos), print the photos and return back to the refilled cartridge.



#10 MoxieMomma

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Posted 27 March 2016 - 10:06 PM

Hi:

 

This has been a real problem for some, but it just takes and extra cartridge to get things going again.  I refill my cartridges and re0use them, but you have to have a new cartridge to put in place if only to print one page, then back to the refill.  It doesn't remember past the last cartridge installed.  It just knows that you removed one that was low warning and once removed, it won't go right back in.  I save some photo printouts for the swap out, when the unit says ink is low, I put in new cartridges (just for photos), print the photos and return back to the refilled cartridge.

 

Interesting.

 

Perhaps I misunderstand, but, from what you describe, it sounds as if the printer was operating as designed/intended.

The workaround for this "problem" sounds more like a "hack" to bypass the way the printer is engineered, in order to permit the use of refilled/after-market cartridges?

 

Oh, well, different strokes for different folks, I guess. :)

 

Cheers,

MM



#11 mjd420nova

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Posted 27 March 2016 - 10:40 PM

HP uses a number of different methods to monitor and track ink usage.  Some cartridges have chips in them and can't be used but I have heard of a "hack" using a nine volt battery across certain contacts and it solves the problem.. I don't know the specific units or cartridge numbers.  I use the number 71 and it can be swapped as described.   That's for the HP 1510 unit, and all in one.  Cheap, yes, $100.  Thirty dollar cartridges.  XL refills are $10 more but make excellent refill donors.  I keep fresh cartridges for photo prints and swap them out once a week.  I also have a larger more expensive HP 6550 AIO, prices are the same but used the numbers 74 and 75 cartridges.  A nice milligram scale comes in handy to see exactly how much ink is in a new cartridge and what an empty one weighs.  It also helps to get them full but not spilling everywhere.  Cleaning clogged heads is a whole other thing again.



#12 MoxieMomma

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Posted 27 March 2016 - 11:16 PM

HP uses a number of different methods to monitor and track ink usage.  Some cartridges have chips in them and can't be used but I have heard of a "hack" using a nine volt battery across certain contacts and it solves the problem.. I don't know the specific units or cartridge numbers.  I use the number 71 and it can be swapped as described.   That's for the HP 1510 unit, and all in one.  Cheap, yes, $100.  Thirty dollar cartridges.  XL refills are $10 more but make excellent refill donors.  I keep fresh cartridges for photo prints and swap them out once a week.  I also have a larger more expensive HP 6550 AIO, prices are the same but used the numbers 74 and 75 cartridges.  A nice milligram scale comes in handy to see exactly how much ink is in a new cartridge and what an empty one weighs.  It also helps to get them full but not spilling everywhere.  Cleaning clogged heads is a whole other thing again.

 

Waaaaaaaaaaaay too much trouble to save a few $. :wink:

 

I order HP ink with 2 mouse-clicks and it arrives on my doorstep next Business Day (free shipping).
And I don't have to worry about clogged heads or lousy printing results.
I suspect the frequent cartridge removals/reinsertions probably aren't great for the hardware, either.
And then there's the warranty issue.

 

But that's just me.
I've never been into hacking.

 

Different strokes for different folks.

 

Cheers,


Edited by MoxieMomma, 27 March 2016 - 11:17 PM.





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