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Meet UbuntuBSD, Unix for Noobies!


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#1 Captain_Chicken

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 08:57 PM

http://news.softpedia.com/news/meet-ubuntubsd-unix-for-human-beings-501959.shtml

 

What's ubuntuBSD? Well, we've asked that ourselves when we first spotted the project created by Jon Boden, and it's not that hard to figure out yourself, but just in case you're not sure, we can tell you that ubuntuBSD promises to bring the power of the FreeBSD kernel to Ubuntu Linux. It is inspired by Debian GNU/kFreeBSD.

 

ubuntuBSD looks like something that has never been done before, and as usual, we were very curious to see how it works, so we took it for a quick test drive. Please note that at the moment of writing this article, the ubuntuBSD project was in Beta stages of development, based on the FreeBSD 10.1 and Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf).

Can't wait to spin it up in a VM  :bounce: . I'll share my experiences.

 

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#2 MadmanRB

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 11:49 PM

Not entirely sure about this because BSD compatibility is worse than Linux in certain situations especially where applications are concerned

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#3 mremski

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 01:59 AM

Not entirely sure about this because BSD compatibility is worse than Linux in certain situations especially where applications are concerned

Except for the fact that FreeBSD has had it's "Linuxulator" for a long time.  Oh, you don't know what that is?  Compatibility module to run Linux binaries natively.

Have you ever heard of the FreeBSD Ports tree?  No?  Ports of pretty much all the Open Source applications.  Most wind up having been built and packaged, so you can just download and install.  Worst case, you may have to go to a console window and type "make install" to build it.

 

OS compatibility is all about "do the applications I want to use run on the OS".  I don't run Flight Simulators, so I don't care if Flight Sim XYZ doesn't run on FreeBSD/DragonFlyBSD/OpenBSD/NetBSD.  As for typical desktop applications, Firefox, Chromium, Thunderbird, GnuCash all run just fine on FreeBSD and have been for a long time.

 

This project looks like it's along the lines of PC-BSD;  basically make a turnkey installation so an enduser can install it and have a pretty desktop all setup.

 

OP: I'm looking forward to what you think.  I'm a FreeBSD on the desktop user for a long time, so I'm not the target for this, but I'd like to hear what you have to say about it.


FreeBSD since 3.3, only time I touch Windows is to fix my wife's computer


#4 Captain_Chicken

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 09:35 AM

Well... I guess it is a beta. It has me stuck in an infinite loop of setting up the text-based installer and rebooting. Haven't seen any errors. Tried allocating it more ram and that didn't help.  :mellow:

Using virtualbox on an ubuntu 15.10 host.


Edited by Captain_Chicken, 25 March 2016 - 09:36 AM.

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#5 Guest_hollowface_*

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 11:46 PM

Sounds pretty cool. Might have to give it a whirl at some point. Do we know if it supports UEFI?


Edited by hollowface, 25 March 2016 - 11:47 PM.


#6 wizardfromoz

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Posted 26 March 2016 - 02:58 AM

The Register have this - http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/03/22/ubuntubsd_released/

 

... but no mention of UEFI

 

Seems to be a sysvinit vs systemd motive there, perhaps?

 

I'll watch with interest, for now, would love to have a play, but too busy at the moment.

 

Enjoy

 

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#7 cat1092

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Posted 27 March 2016 - 05:12 AM

Looks to have a lot of potential, though may take awhile to get things smooth, it's still very much a beta release, much more so than the upcoming Ubuntu 16.04 & later derivatives built from the OS. 

 

If not there now, hopefully UEFI will be a priority, as many are purchasing more energy efficient computers, especially mobile users, for increased battery life, and the other enhancements that UEFI offers. GPT being one, will eventually make Logical partitioning obsolete, and for some, already has. Like with anything new, once consumers gets attached to the new features, most doesn't want to look back. 

 

One reason why a UEFI release must be on or near the top of the 'to do' list for the OS. 

 

Of course, there's still many (hundreds of millions of) non-UEFI devices to run this on for now, at least until it becomes stable enough to be considered a release candidate. :thumbup2:

 

I see this as progress, to have the best of both worlds in a single OS. Hopefully there will be different DE's to boot into, anyone with FreeBSD experience may not like the graphical effects at boot, and vice versa. To those who are running Ubuntu & it's derivatives, booting into a BSD environment will (initially) look like rescue mode. :P

 

Not to worry, all is fine. BSD has been & still is built from the ground up for enhanced security, so Ubuntu users will benefit from that greatly. While the OS may not be for everyone, there will be many to enjoy the ride, especially once it reaches RC status. By then, it'll likely be UEFI compliant. 

 

Notably, it's 64 bit only, of course to be UEFI compliant, has to be. :thumbup2:

 

 

 

ubuntuBSD is currently hosted on the SourceForge website and distributed as an installable-only ISO image for 64-bit (amd64) computers. You can also download the Beta of ubuntuBSD 15.04 (codename "Escape from systemD") via our website, but you need to be aware of the fact that it's still in heavy development and bugs might occur during or after the installation.

 

http://news.softpedia.com/news/meet-ubuntubsd-unix-for-human-beings-501959.shtml

 

This is a development that I'll surely bookmark & keep track of. :)

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 27 March 2016 - 05:18 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#8 mremski

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Posted 27 March 2016 - 05:41 AM

UEFI support has been making it's way into FreeBSD.  10.1 may have very limited support, 10.3 (currently in release candidate testing) has full or near full support.  I believe the support for EFI booting of ZFS root partition is in 10.3.

 

WIth all the different DEs available, not many folks would actually notice the underlying OS (according to MadmanRB there is no reason to use the command line).

 

OpenBSD is the variant that specifically targets security, FreeBSD original charter was highest performance on x86 platforms, NetBSD "run on anything".  Those are the 3 grandaddies of the BSD tree (which has it's roots directly in "original UNIX" by Bell Labs/AT&T).  Some newcomers that have promise are DragonFlyBSD (a fork of FreeBSD that wanted to take scaling in a different direction) and HardenedBSD (another FreeBSD fork that is looking at security aspects related mostly to mitigation).  

 

The best thing about the BSDs?  Good code and fixes cross the lines and make it into each other.  Many of OpenBSDs security fixes get pulled into the others, the best example is "pf" the packet filter.  Google up pfSense for a good example.

 

That's enough about the BSDs before I get chastised for going off topic, but if anyone is interested I can provide links.


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#9 cat1092

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Posted 28 March 2016 - 01:51 AM

mremski, thanks for taking the time to explain a little about the security aspect of FreeBSD. :thumbup2:

 

Which will surely be incorporated into this release, otherwise, may as well leave the 'BSD' name off (as to not tarnish it's good name). I believe that this will actually be pulled off, because it certainly benefits Ubuntu (& it's derivatives) in succeeding & security is a Hot Topic at the moment. :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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