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Cultural Differences


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#1 Naught McNoone

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 03:59 PM

We have really everything in common with America nowadays except, of course, language. Oscar Wilde, The Canterville Ghost, 1882

 

 

"Blowing snow" seems to have a different meaning in the United States, than it does  in Canada.

 

Does anyone else have any "cultural differences," real or perceived, that they may want to share?

 

Cheers!

 

Naught.



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#2 softeyes

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 05:31 PM

USA elevator vs. UK lift

USA drugstore employee vs. UK chemist

USA TV vs. UK Telly

 

So many others!



#3 Naught McNoone

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Posted 26 March 2016 - 12:56 PM

USA elevator vs. UK lift

USA drugstore employee vs. UK chemist

USA TV vs. UK Telly

 

So many others!

 

Softeyes,

 

Yes, there are so many words or expressions that mean the same thing.

 

But I think that cultural differences go much deeper than that.  Saying the same expression means different things, depending on where you are from.

 

For instance, I think we can all agree that the ideal temperature for chilled beer is 4 degrees.

 

But a Canadian is thinking 4 Celsius, and an American is thinking 4 Fahrenheit, and of course our Australian cousins are thinking 4 Kelvin. :scratchhead: 

 

Tuppence,

 

Naught.



#4 66Batmobile

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Posted 26 March 2016 - 02:10 PM

 

For instance, I think we can all agree that the ideal temperature for chilled beer is 4 degrees.

 

But a Canadian is thinking 4 Celsius, and an American is thinking 4 Fahrenheit, and of course our Australian cousins are thinking 4 Kelvin. :scratchhead:

 

In Fahrenheit-land, that would actually be a beer-cicle.  And yes, it has definitely been done :wink:.

 

Cultural differences? Just within the U.S. take the concept of "critters"...

 

In more urban areas, "critters" generally require a call to some sort of pest control company.

 

In, shall we say, more "rural" settings, you see signs for "Critter Cookouts."

 

 

edited-Please note the above was intended in fun


Edited by 66Batmobile, 26 March 2016 - 02:41 PM.

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#5 ScathEnfys

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Posted 26 March 2016 - 05:15 PM

@Batmobile 4°K is even worse you know :P only 4° above absolute 0
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#6 Condobloke

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Posted 26 March 2016 - 06:54 PM

""and of course our Australian cousins are thinking 4 Kelvin ""

 

Mate......i like my beer cold.....but 4 kelvin ?...really...??!!

 

Tell the vast majority of aussies the temp today is 4 kelvin (-260C), and they would immediately assume you have had your head stuck in the beer fridge for a prolonged period of time..... :hysterical:

 

My wife is Filipino, and despite being well educated and a quick thinker, still struggles (at times) with the weird and wonderful mangling/butchering of the english language/phraseology carried out by australians, as part of their cultural difference from the Brits & Yanks etc

 

Something as simple as " how about you come over and we'll throw a bit of dead animal on the barbie and wash it down with a gallon of koolaid " will bring a look of pure astonishment/bewilderment to her face...

("would you like to come to our house and we will cook some meat on the barbeque, and drink some beer etc )

 

On a more serious note.....possibly the most obvious difference is in our attitude toward each other. In her culture the man is the king of the household. He does not need to 'do battle' to establish that position.....nor does he need to be arrogant to maintain that position. He need only be a normal peaceful 'in control of the household and its business' individual, and all will be peaceful. If he allows the organisation to slip and allows day to day things to just slip by the wayside....then he will subject to most gentle reminders that I have ever encountered.


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#7 Naught McNoone

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Posted 28 March 2016 - 10:41 AM

 " how about you come over and we'll throw a bit of dead animal on the barbie and wash it down with a gallon of koolaid "

 

My apologies to our Aussie cousins, for the little craic.   :wink:  And yes, my cousin, who lives in Brisbane, does like his beer near the freezing mark.  I keep mine on the cellar floor, which is fine by me.

 

Cultural differences are not limited to different nationalities.  Here's a phrase I first heard in Calgary, Alberta, as spoken by a "Down Homer" from Heart's Content, Newfoundland. (Both in Canada!)

 

"Stay where you be, until I come where your at."

 

Loosely translated:  Wait there, I'll coming to meet you.

 

Cheers!

 

Naught



#8 wizardfromoz

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Posted 29 March 2016 - 02:37 AM

Me wife has one. Elaine referred to how in Oz, if you invite someone to a barbecue or dinner and they ask "Can we bring anything?" we say "Just bring a plate" (with food on it, a dish, so to speak). A Sri Lankan couple she knew were scratching their heads wondering why in a country as well-off as Australia, they might need to bring an empty plate. Poor possums might have thought we engage in plate-smashing after the meal, like the Greeks? (there are more Greeks in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia than the population of Athens, Greece), lol.

 

My contribution is Japanese-based. Love most things Japanese - studied the language in high school, then a further 3 years in University. Only had a one-night stopover so far, on way to England, 1988. Love the food, how could you not love sushi?

 

The Japanese tea ceremony can take up to eight (8) hours to complete. I am a coffee drinker, but my wife would be saying "Where's me flamin' cuppa tea?? I've got to go out for a fag (cigarette)".

 

Lol.

 

:wizardball: Wizard - nice topic, Naught :thumbup2:, )

 

BTW - been brewing me own beer for 21 years plus, nice drop - it's fridged in the garage at 4 degrees - you guess)

 

Edited - added BTW


Edited by wizardfromoz, 29 March 2016 - 02:40 AM.


#9 Guest_JWebb_*

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Posted 29 March 2016 - 03:15 AM

beckham_cross_3501102b.jpg

 

Football

 

111015_lb_football-linemen_free.jpg

 

Real football



#10 wizardfromoz

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Posted 29 March 2016 - 04:00 AM

Courtesy-Daily-Telegraph1.jpg

 

Realer football - Aussie Rules, based on Gaelic football



#11 Guest_JWebb_*

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Posted 01 April 2016 - 08:47 PM

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Gaelic, heh heh.



#12 Naught McNoone

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Posted 04 April 2016 - 11:48 AM

Gaelic, heh heh.

 

JWebb,

 

When you say Gaelic, do you mean Irish, Scots, Manx, Welsh, Cornish, Pict, or Galli, the original language from Iberia?   :scratchhead:

 

Does anyone speak Pict or Galli any more?  :unsure:

 

Cheers!

 

Naught



#13 Animal

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Posted 04 April 2016 - 04:12 PM

Does anyone speak Pict or Galli any more?  :unsure:
 
Cheers!
 
Naught


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#14 wizardfromoz

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Posted 04 April 2016 - 09:21 PM

Good comeback Animal, you should contribute at Prog Rock, lots of Floydians there, lol.

 

@Naught:

 

 

When you say Gaelic, do you mean Irish, Scots, Manx, Welsh, Cornish, Pict, or Galli, the original language from Iberia?

 

Between them they invented two wonderful types of whisky, golf, and Harry Secombe. Can't knock the Gaels.

 

And all but the Picts and the speakers of Galli were exported to Australia as convicts to enhance our, spirited, population.

 

:wizardball: Wizard



#15 Guest_JWebb_*

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Posted 05 April 2016 - 12:03 AM

Excuse me, WFO.  Weren't you the one who brought up Gaelic?

 

I just made a simple Beavis and Butthead joke about it.

 

Someday you and McNoone will be able to view BB in your countries and you will understand its subtle wit.






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