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Windows 10 hangs on spinning dots


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#16 Chuck Devlin

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Posted 20 March 2016 - 02:09 PM

I have been following this post as it appears to be the same as mine.  I have tried two System Restores from March 7th - one was an automatic restore point and the other one either before or after a microsoft update.  Both failed on error code :0x800703f1 - failed while restoring the Registry.  Configuration Registry Databse is corrupt.  I may shortly try a pc reset if I can without install disk.  But first will try running some more trouble shooting utilities.



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#17 _Adi

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Posted 20 March 2016 - 02:11 PM

Please do post here if you find any solutions...



#18 _Adi

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Posted 31 March 2016 - 09:01 AM

Poking around, I noticed that while the dots are spinning, it seems that the PC is actually accessing the network as it spins.

I see this in the router stats.

Any ideas?



#19 Chuck Devlin

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Posted 31 March 2016 - 01:40 PM

Actually I resolved the problem by performing a PC Reset and then restoring his files.

#20 _Adi

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Posted 31 March 2016 - 01:41 PM

You mean a full reset that erases the files, and then restored from backup?

This is annoying since it boots in safe-mode :-(



#21 Chuck Devlin

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Posted 31 March 2016 - 02:06 PM

I logged on via Safe Mode with Networking, backed up 20 gig of user data within User Account via a copy of user to a flash drive. Then performed a pc reset which used the recovery partition and deleted all his files, this was, I believe, the second of three options. Then booted up normally and pasted the flash drive backup into C:

It became obvious that the computer had a corrupted Registry, probably from the client using a registry cleaner. Other possibility would be a bug in windows 10.

#22 OCCS

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Posted 10 June 2016 - 08:31 PM

Now this has been driving me mad for a while now .. I have found the solution . UPDATES .. uninstall them all for windows 10 and reinstall .. Worked for me.. I narrowed it down .. looks like its something to do with the update KB3156421


Edited by OCCS, 11 June 2016 - 01:02 AM.


#23 CKing123

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Posted 07 July 2016 - 11:35 AM

Hi

 

Let's get the boot log

=======================

1. Boot into Safe Mode

2. Press windowskey_zps092d5c75.pngR

3. Type msconfig and press enter

4. Go to Boot tab

5. Checkmark Boot Log

 

uC9oEzZ.png

 

6. Restart your computer, and let it hang

7. Then, reboot and attach the C:\Windows\ntbtlog.txt file

 

-CKing


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#24 FreeBooter

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Posted 07 July 2016 - 11:52 PM

Please try below troubleshooting steps.
 
1. Boot your computer into Safe Mode if the issue resolves within Safe Mode then one of the startup programs or services causing the issue perform a clean boot to find out which startup program causing the issue.
 
2. Open Command Prompt as a administrator and type Sfc /Scannow command and press Enter key to repair any damage Windows system files.
 
 
In case you are unable to start the System File Checker and you instead get the “Windows Resource Protection Could Not Start the Repair Service” error, you may want to check up if Windows Modules Installer service has been Disabled. To do so, type services.msc in Start Menu search box and hit Enter. The startup type of this service should be set to Manual. Double click the Windows Modules Installer service name to set its startup type to Manual.

3. Type Chkdsk C: /f  command to repair C: partition NTFS file system errors.
 
4. Check the Event Viewer for any error or warning logs that may give you clue what is causing the issue.
 
5. Windows System Repair Disc can be created containing the Windows Recovery Environment (WinRE) i recommend creating a Windows Repair Disc to anybody without a Windows OS installation DVD.
 

Create a Windows Vista System Repair Disc

The Service Pack 1 must be install to create a Windows System Repair Disc from Windows Vista.
Program that creates a Windows System Repair Disc can be started from "Start Menu --> All Programs --> Maintenance --> Create a Recovery Disc". Follow the instructions to create a Windows System Repair Disk you will need either a blank CD or DVD.


Create a Windows 7 System Repair Disc

Open the "Backup and Restore" by clicking the "Start Menu --> Control Panel --> System and Maintenance --> Backup and Restore" and In the left pane, click “Create a system repair disc”. You will need a blank CD or DVD and then just follow the instructions to create a Windows Repair Disk.


Create a Windows 8, 8.1 System Repair Disc

Open the Search charm by dragging your mouse to the top or bottom right corners of the screen or press WinKey + Q keys and type Recover into Search charm and click Create a recovery drive to create USB recovery drive which will include WinRE and optionally Windows OS factory recover image.
You will need empty USB Flash Drive or blank CD or DVD if you click “Create a system repair disk with a CD or DVD” option on the Connect USB flash drive screen.


Create a Windows 10 Recovery Drive

Even if your PC can't start, you can use the Recovery drive to reset it or troubleshoot problems. If you back up system files to this drive, you'll also be able to use it to reinstall Windows.
Open your Start menu, type RecoveryDrive.exe in the search box, press Enter key.
Check or Uncheck the Back up system files to the recovery drive box for what you want to do, and click on Next button.
Select the USB flash drive (ex: "E:\ (USB)" ) you want to make a recovery drive, and click on Next button.
When ready to start, click on Create button.
 
Boot your computer with Windows System Repair Disc and open Command Prompt type below commands one at time to restore registry hives from Windows created registry backup.
 
Ren
C:\windows\system32\config\SAM       
SAM.BAK

Ren C:\windows\system32\config\SYSTEM    
SYSTEM.BAK

Ren C:\windows\system32\config\SECURITY  
SECURITY.BAK

Ren C:\windows\system32\config\DEFAULT   
DEFAULT.BAK

Ren C:\windows\system32\config\SOFTWARE  
SOFTWARE.BAK

 

Copy C:\Windows\System32\config\RegBack\SAM        C:\windows\system32\config

Copy C:\Windows\System32\config\RegBack\SYSTEM     C:\windows\system32\config

Copy C:\Windows\System32\config\RegBack\SECURITY   C:\windows\system32\config

Copy C:\Windows\System32\config\RegBack\DEFAULT    C:\windows\system32\config

Copy C:\Windows\System32\config\RegBack\SOFTWARE   C:\windows\system32\config
 
 
This procedure assumes that Windows Vista/7/8/8.1/10 is installed to the C:\ partition. Make sure to replace C:\ drive letter to the appropriate Windows OS installed partition drive letter if it is a different location.
When computer boots into WinRE environment the drive letter assign to Windows partition may not be C: drive letter because Windows 7, 8 , 8.1 and 10 creates a separate system partition when it's installed from scratch. The system partition contains boot files WinRE assigns the system partition the C: drive letter and the Windows installed partition will be assign any other drive letter usually D: drive letter is assign to Windows installed partition. The Bcdedit /enum | find "osdevice" command can be use to find out the drive letter of the Windows installed partition the output of the Bcdedit command is similar to this osdevice partition=D:. The drive letter after partition= is the drive letter of the Windows partition.
After replacing registry hives with backup hives some programs may not work correctly you may need to reinstall any program that is not working.

Edited by FreeBooter, 07 July 2016 - 11:54 PM.

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#25 anthonymaw

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 09:07 AM

Those spinning white dots hides the actual process of loading and initializing device drivers, background services, etc.  If it's stuck on the spinning white dots it means one of the scripted startup drivers or services is stuck and possibly does not have a time-out.  It's hard to figure out what it is because Windows 10 doesn't have a "verbose mode" boot.  Also all of the above steps assume you can boot into Windows and run mschonfig.exe, get into Control Panel, run diagnostic utilities, etc.  If it is stuck on spinning dots you don't have a lot of choices especially if your computer is booting UEFI.  What worked for me (sort of) on my laptop was to remove the battery running on AC power only.  Then when it boots to the spinning dots I pulled out the power and rebooted.  It will go into the useless "running Windows diagnostics".  I would pull out the power again, reboot it tries to boot normally.  Basically I have to repeat until it boots normally.  I have an HP Pavilion dv7 laptop booting UEFI to an SSD.  When it finally boots, the spinning dots appears for around 5 seconds, the HP logo disappears and I get the Windows 10 login screen within ten seconds, but yeah it's really frustrating when it screws up.



#26 britechguy

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 09:25 AM

Windows 10 does have a verbose boot mode, and I've been using it for so long that I can't remember how I set it, but I believe it was via the regedit method documented here:

 

           https://superuser.com/questions/1006850/how-to-boot-in-verbose-boot-for-windows-10 

 

It also appears that one can get to it by using the System Configuration utility that comes up as the first and only result when I hit WinKey and enter "System Configuration."  What's interesting is that even though verbose mode (and it's at boot and shutdown) is enabled on my system that checkbox in the System Configuration boot tab does not show as checked.  As per usual, Microsoft provides multiple roads to Rome, so to speak.


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