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Damaged super I/O chip


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#1 Weerwolf

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Posted 17 March 2016 - 12:14 AM

Hi guys. So I upgraded my pc a bit. Got the R9 390. Also had to get a new case since mine was too small for the new card. So moved everything over and everything went great. Then I found out the R9 isn't compatible with my mobo (dp67bg) but that there are ways to get it to work.

Decided to wait till today so I can use my work laptop and team viewer to get the drivers on there (which apparently work). So anyway, I was messing around with an extra fan I bought, wanted to check out the LED on it. The moron that I am, I plugged the little LED power cable into the wrong port and ended up frying my super I/O chip. Now I didn't know what it was till I cooked it. Wasn't crazy damage. It popped and smoked a bit but not like there was serious burn marks. Now my question is this, will I still be able to use my motherboard with a fried I/O chip? I know it's used for legacy devices which I don't really have. Apparently it's also used for fan control and such (which I can set to manual for now). Just don't want it to damage my other components. I seriously don't have the cash now to buy a new mobo+cpu at present

Cpu: i5 2500k
Mobo: Intel dp67bg
Ram: 16gb ddr3 1333Mhz
Psu: Corsair GS600
Gfx card: Radeon R9 390
OS: Win7 Ultimate x64

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#2 the_patriot11

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Posted 17 March 2016 - 07:57 PM

guess you could plug it in and find out? and why isnt your motherboard compatible with the video card, as long as its got a pci express 16 slot, it should function just fine, as long as your power supply has all the appropriate connectors.


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Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

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#3 Weerwolf

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Posted 18 March 2016 - 01:35 AM

Apparently the older motherboard bios' don't natively support the architecture of the new graphics cards. A simple bios update fixes it most of the time but Intel decided to not update their boards anymore so isn't an option with the DP67BG. It just gets stuck with the code 0_ in the lower right corner and that's how it stays. Windows actually boots but you can't see anything. So you need to install the AMD driver for it to work. But you can't do that without the card in your pc.

 

I just decided to bite the bullet and bought a new mobo and cpu. Didn't want to risk my new graphics card and it obviously solved the incompatibility issue. Will just have to eat baked beans on toast for the rest of the month :P



#4 dc3

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Posted 18 March 2016 - 11:15 AM

Now you have one more possible hurdle, the operating system.

 

You have probably heard that Windows it tied to your motherboard.  It is, but more specifically it is tied to the identifiers found in the chipset.  When you boot into Windows it recognizes these identifiers and Windows proceeds to boot.  But when you install the new motherboard the operating system sees the new identifiers and basically becomes confused.  The operating system may not even boot because of this.  Or the operating system will boot but gradually deteriorate to the point that you will have to reinstall the operating system.  This means there is a good chance you will have to reinstall Windows 7.

 

In the future you use the instructions below to generalize the hdd before moving it to another motherboard.

 

 If you run sysprep on the HHD/SSD with Windows 7 or 8.1 and now 10 before using it with another motherboard you should be be able to boot from it without any complications. You want to remove all hardware identifiers from the HDD/SSD, this generalizes the drive.

 
Click on the Start orb, then type cmd in the Search box.
 
cmd will appear under Programs above the search box, right click on it and choose Run as administrator.
 
This will open the Elevated Command Prompt.
 
In the Elevated Command Prompt type in CD C:\Windows\System32\Sysprep, then 
use the command: sysprep /generalize /oobe /shutdown.
 
Don't power the drive back on until it's in the other computer.

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#5 Weerwolf

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Posted 18 March 2016 - 03:30 PM

Yeah... I just formatted and installed Windows 10. I'd rather format than sit with potential issues



#6 mjd420nova

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Posted 18 March 2016 - 04:18 PM

I love the smell of burning logic chips.  Especially the ones that smoke.  I'll bet you could locate it with a magnifying glass.  Just look for one with a valley/crack across the top.  Might look like a scratch at first.  Some serious soldering skills and another hunt for that same chip, might get it in business again.






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