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Cannot upgrade to windows 10 (from win 7)


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#1 doresy

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Posted 14 March 2016 - 05:25 PM

Over the last few month I keep getting 'installing 4 updates' every time I shut down. On reboot they have failed and so we go on. I have tried several fixes from internet but to no avail! (one being reinstalling SP1 but as it doesn't show for deleting then apparently it was pre-installed so cannot be deleted?)

 

 In my limited understanding of such things I thought maybe because I hadn't accepted the offer of upgrading to Win 10 that this was the root of it all. If I accept and start the download up pops the same 4 win updates which of course fail!

 

Am I missing something? All help greatly appreciated.

 

I was going to do a restore for say 6 months but restore points only go back several days which seems odd compared to win XP


Edited by doresy, 14 March 2016 - 05:27 PM.

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#2 usasma

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Posted 15 March 2016 - 06:59 AM

Unless you're bound and determined to do an upgrade install (I strongly recommend against it), you can do a clean install of W10 using your W7 product key.

Historically, upgrade installs have many more problems than clean installs - so most techs suggest avoiding them like the plague.
Also, if the upgrade install does work, it's usually more difficult to fix any problems related to the upgrade - causing technicians to frequently suggest wiping the system and clean installing W10

Next, the success of an upgrade install is usually related to how well-used the old Windows installation was.  The longer/more used it was, the less likely it is to be trouble free.
And finally, in the event that you choose to revert to W7 (within 30 days), it's highly possible that the revert won't work - and you won't be able to recover the installation - so then you're stuck with a clean install of W7

 

So, first, make sure that you've saved the product key, that you have recovery media for W7 (in case you want to go back), and that you've backed up any data that you want to save.

Then use this link to make DVD or USB drive install media: 

 

If, after the clean install, you have problems or there are unknown devices in Device Manager, post back and we can help fix that up also.


Edited by usasma, 15 March 2016 - 07:03 AM.

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#3 Niweg

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Posted 15 March 2016 - 08:25 AM

 The number of restore points you have depends on how much space you have reserved for it, usually 10 - 20% of your C: drive.  So it depends on two things, the size of your C: partition and the percentage of that partition that's reserved for restore points.  

 

 If you have some updates that are failing, go to Windows Update and let it search for updates.  Then look to see what updates it finds, and uncheck the failing one(s).  That may take a bit of trial and error, but shouldn't be terribly difficult.  

 

 I do agree with Usama's recommend to do a clean install.  If you have the space, you could partition your hard drive and install Windows 10 in the new partition, giving you a dual boot configuration.

 

 Before doing any upgrade, you really need to make a full system backup to an external hard drive so you have a way to recover when Murphy strikes.

 

 Good luck.


Make regular full system backups or you'll be sorry sooner or later.


#4 doresy

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Posted 15 March 2016 - 11:57 AM

Unless you're bound and determined to do an upgrade install (I strongly recommend against it), you can do a clean install of W10 using your W7 product key.

Historically, upgrade installs have many more problems than clean installs - so most techs suggest avoiding them like the plague.
Also, if the upgrade install does work, it's usually more difficult to fix any problems related to the upgrade - causing technicians to frequently suggest wiping the system and clean installing W10

Next, the success of an upgrade install is usually related to how well-used the old Windows installation was.  The longer/more used it was, the less likely it is to be trouble free.
And finally, in the event that you choose to revert to W7 (within 30 days), it's highly possible that the revert won't work - and you won't be able to recover the installation - so then you're stuck with a clean install of W7

 

So, first, make sure that you've saved the product key, that you have recovery media for W7 (in case you want to go back), and that you've backed up any data that you want to save.

Then use this link to make DVD or USB drive install media: 

 

If, after the clean install, you have problems or there are unknown devices in Device Manager, post back and we can help fix that up also.

Thank you for your time and reply. All noted and advise now taken....


Windows XP Home....Netgear DG834G wireless modem/router....ISP- AOL.

#5 doresy

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Posted 15 March 2016 - 11:58 AM

 The number of restore points you have depends on how much space you have reserved for it, usually 10 - 20% of your C: drive.  So it depends on two things, the size of your C: partition and the percentage of that partition that's reserved for restore points.  

 

 If you have some updates that are failing, go to Windows Update and let it search for updates.  Then look to see what updates it finds, and uncheck the failing one(s).  That may take a bit of trial and error, but shouldn't be terribly difficult.  

 

 I do agree with Usama's recommend to do a clean install.  If you have the space, you could partition your hard drive and install Windows 10 in the new partition, giving you a dual boot configuration.

 

 Before doing any upgrade, you really need to make a full system backup to an external hard drive so you have a way to recover when Murphy strikes.

 

 Good luck.

Thank you, I will be leaving it for now and see how it goes 


Windows XP Home....Netgear DG834G wireless modem/router....ISP- AOL.

#6 doresy

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Posted 15 March 2016 - 12:01 PM

 

 The number of restore points you have depends on how much space you have reserved for it, usually 10 - 20% of your C: drive.  So it depends on two things, the size of your C: partition and the percentage of that partition that's reserved for restore points.  

 

 If you have some updates that are failing, go to Windows Update and let it search for updates.  Then look to see what updates it finds, and uncheck the failing one(s).  That may take a bit of trial and error, but shouldn't be terribly difficult.  

 

 I do agree with Usama's recommend to do a clean install.  If you have the space, you could partition your hard drive and install Windows 10 in the new partition, giving you a dual boot configuration.

 

 Before doing any upgrade, you really need to make a full system backup to an external hard drive so you have a way to recover when Murphy strikes.

 

 Good luck.

Thank you, I will be leaving it for now and see how it goes 

The upgrade keeps failing for some reason and as I was only going to try to install Win10 in an attempt to clear update failures anyway it all seems futile! 


Windows XP Home....Netgear DG834G wireless modem/router....ISP- AOL.




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