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capacitor broke -> I soldered but something isnt right..


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#1 Zydee

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Posted 14 March 2016 - 03:26 PM

So my battery on my asus laptop had died out completely and so it was in need of being replaced; I opened the laptop (asus laptop batteries are internal) and removed in, but as I was working on it, I accidently knocked off a capacitor and it needed to be resoldered. I went out to my local store and bought a kit to solder and I might have messed up.. Here are my concerns:

 

1. While soldering, I couldnt get too close to the motherboard as it was a cramped space, so I put a lot of solder and its sticking up? Can too much solder be bad? 

2. After finishing the solder and thirty minutes had passed, I tried powering on the laptop but it wouldnt turn on? (the capacitor that fell off was right next to the area where the battery connects to the mother board) The following morning, I plugged it in and the charging light turned on (didnt the night before) but I was too scared to power it on.

3. The soldering needle (that melts the metal) did touch the mother board around 5 times for one to two seconds. I dont know if this is bad or not?)

 

I made sure the solder didnt touch any other metals on the motherboard since I didnt want to accidentally make a new connection.. The connections are correct (positive and negative); charges. Any thoughts? Is it dangerous to use? Thanks!

 



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#2 DeimosChaos

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Posted 14 March 2016 - 03:41 PM

More than likely it doesn't have a good connection.... Or it's shorted.... You really need to make sure you have a good clean connection to the board, I am not sure if an excessive amount of solder is really bad, but it definitely will not help it. You probably will need to take the board out and redo the solder connection. If you had only access to one side, it may not have made the correct connection. Like I am thinking pins are too short and somehow it doesn't connect where it should or something like that.

 

But honestly if you have never done this I would suggest getting help from someone that has soldering experience.


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#3 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 14 March 2016 - 06:09 PM

It almost certainly is not dangerous to you to use in this condition, the risk of you getting an electric shock from a laptop that has the casing closed up is essentially zero. However, I would NOT use the laptop in this condition as there is a very real risk of doing electrical damage to the motherboard.

 

I personally would use a new capacitor to replace the one you knocked off the board, you may have damaged it. If it was, as it probably was, an electrolytic capacitor they are marked with their capacity (in microfarads, expressed as uF, the Greek letter 'mu') and a voltage rating. You would need to match both of these. If it is not an electrolytic capacitor then its value will be on it but probably coded but voltage, for solid capacitors, is not important.

 

Unhappily, making a good solder joint is not just a matter of throwing "a lot of solder" at it. With the component densities on motherboards you are almost certain to short something out. Why don't you ask around and see if any of your friends have soldering skills and the necessary tools ?

 

I have to echo Deimos - you definitely need help with the soldering. Trying to make solder repairs on a motherboard is not the place to start learning how to solder, but, believe me, knowing how to solder is a very useful skill. Worth learning.

 

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#4 Havachat

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Posted 15 March 2016 - 12:18 AM

Lesson Learnt i`d say.....dont try and start it until you fix whats not right / more issues may arise.

 

I would as others have suggested , remove the Board completely and then start your repairs with someone overseeing you , that has experience.

Some images uploaded of your work may discourage others from attempting the same avenue , eg: the pitfalls.



#5 dc3

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Posted 15 March 2016 - 10:12 AM

The one thing that I didn't see posted in this topic is the need to observe proper polarity of the capacitor.  If this is a electrolytic capacitor it will have a positive (+) and a negative (-) leg.  The motherboard almost always will have the holes for these capacitors marked for proper polarity.  If the capacitor is install with reversed polarity this could cause the computer not to boot correctly.

 

Did you get the new battery installed before trying to start this computer?


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#6 Zydee

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Posted 15 March 2016 - 10:15 AM

So it started up.. nothing seemed wrong for the hour I let it sit there.. seemed perfectly fine. I also ran the atitool and scanned for artifacts and that came up clean as well. The poles are soldered to the right polarity. Should I be worried? I did remove some.solder from before.

#7 DeimosChaos

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Posted 15 March 2016 - 10:17 AM

The OP mentioned having correctly connected the positive and negative legs of the capacitor. I didn't mention it because of that.

 

If it started up then you are probably okay. I would just be hyper aware of it and if anything seems remotely wrong shut it down! You don't want to damage the board, you do that and you might as well buy a new PC.


Edited by DeimosChaos, 15 March 2016 - 10:18 AM.

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#8 Zydee

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Posted 15 March 2016 - 10:18 AM

Will it be dangerous to use? It wouldn't explode or catch fire right?

#9 DeimosChaos

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Posted 15 March 2016 - 10:21 AM

I wouldn't think so....


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#10 Zydee

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Posted 15 March 2016 - 10:21 AM

Thanks a lot! I'll try it with caution (:

#11 DeimosChaos

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Posted 15 March 2016 - 10:25 AM

As long as the capacitor seems to have a good connection and it isn't wobbly, I'd say you are good. I wouldn't think it would cause any kind of fire or explosion. Saying that however, the capacitor could have been slightly damaged when it got knocked off the board. It could fail eventually, but at least then you know what it might be and you could buy a new capacitor and try all over again.


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#12 dc3

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Posted 15 March 2016 - 10:56 AM

As long as the capacitor seems to have a good connection and it isn't wobbly, I'd say you are good. I wouldn't think it would cause any kind of fire or explosion. Saying that however, the capacitor could have been slightly damaged when it got knocked off the board. It could fail eventually, but at least then you know what it might be and you could buy a new capacitor and try all over again.

Obviously you have not experienced a large electrolytic capacitor exploding.  I had a large power supply on a burn in rack which had a bad cap in it.  The explosion sounded like a M-80 going off, there were pieces of the top of the cap blown thirty feet away.


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#13 DeimosChaos

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Posted 15 March 2016 - 11:03 AM

 

As long as the capacitor seems to have a good connection and it isn't wobbly, I'd say you are good. I wouldn't think it would cause any kind of fire or explosion. Saying that however, the capacitor could have been slightly damaged when it got knocked off the board. It could fail eventually, but at least then you know what it might be and you could buy a new capacitor and try all over again.

Obviously you have not experienced a large electrolytic capacitor exploding.  I had a large power supply on a burn in rack which had a bad cap in it.  The explosion sounded like a M-80 going off, there were pieces of the top of the cap blown thirty feet away.

 

Personally no I haven't. I know they can happen though. In the OP's case he is probably okay though. A capacitor exploding to that point is pretty rare. I did have a few fail on graphics card once, to where the top was burst open, but they didn't explode like that.


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