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Automated switching of router WAN between PPPoE radio and ADSL


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#1 TheVoyager

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Posted 14 March 2016 - 07:46 AM

Home office environment
ASUS RT-N66U router
Originally set in bridge mode via Ethernet to ADSL modem
Now set in PPPoE mode via Ethernet to 5.8Ghz modem radio
 
For reasons that are irrelevant here, my "5.8Ghz radio to microwave backhaul" broadband service is fantastic at most times in the day but poor at others. At the poor times my old landline ADSL service is better.  The times of day for either service to be the better option are predictable so I would like to set up an automated switch between the two.  Such a switch would also bring redundancy in case of either service failing but without the manual swapping of setup (from PPPoE to bridge mode) and Ethernet cables (from router WAN port to either 5.8Ghz radio or ADSL modem) that I have to do today.
 
I would like to buy an inexpensive piece of kit that mimics a cable modem as far as the router's WAN setup is concerned but which actually switches between PPPoE to the 5.8Ghz radio and ADSL to the landline depending on time of day - or seamlessly balancing between the two).
 
What is the name (equipment type or brand name) of what I need to search for, please?
I am a self-teacher and reasonably savvy with setting things up but in this case I don't know the technical name of what I want to do.
 
Many thanks,
TV
 


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#2 Wand3r3r

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Posted 14 March 2016 - 11:44 AM

Dual wan port routers have the feature you are looking for.



#3 TheVoyager

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Posted 14 March 2016 - 11:59 AM

Thank you Wand3r3r - as opposed to me as TheVoyager! :)

 

Prompted by your post I see that my router is dual WAN (but only has one physical WAN port which is what threw me) so I will do some digging.

Hopefully I can reconfigure one of the LAN ports or use a USB ADSL modem.

If I succeed I will post back for the benefit of others in the future.



#4 TheVoyager

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Posted 15 March 2016 - 08:52 AM

The ASUS RT-N66U is a breeze to set up for dual WAN (where one LAN port can indeed be specified as a second WAN port) but the functionality is more limiting than I expected.   Following is what I found on trying the two available modes: Load Balancing and Failover:

 

Failover mode - The router sticks with the primary WAN even when throughput has dropped to almost zero because it hasn't actually disconnected.  I have to physically pull the plug on the primary WAN to get the router to failover to the secondary WAN - which it then near-instantly does.
 
Load balancing mode - To my untrained mind not true load balancing as ISPs and therefore networks are different so packets cannot be split and then recombined at the other end. All packets for a given connection therefore follow one route - WAN1 or WAN2, not a blend of the two. The load balancing ratio setting appears to be used to  allocate connected sessions, not allocate actual load.  To explain: In this sequence, imagine 2 web sessions opening, followed by a torrent download and finally a internet radio stream. With a ratio of 1:1 these will get shared equally between WANs in the sequence they were created; WAN1 ends up with one web session and a torrent download and WAN 2 with a web session and a radio stream. With 3:1 the first three get sent to WAN1 and the last one to WAN2 - so the low bitrate radio has a whole pipe to itself whilst two web sessions compete with a torrent. 
 
It is possible to peg specific devices to a specific WAN but this is no help to me and my scenario; WAN1 degrading badly between the same times every day so me wanting to switch everything to WAN2.
 
Conclusion - To force switchover when WAN1 degrades use failover mode all the time (forcing everything to WAN1) and pull out the WAN1 cable from the router when the service does degrade - but leave the WAN1 modem powered up. Switching back then takes about 5 seconds on reconnecting the WAN1 cable.  Another way is to put the WAN1 modem on a mains timer to switch it off just before the time of day when service degrades and back on at the time of day when this has typically passed - but don't then join a one hour VOIP call just before the timer kicks in!

Edited by TheVoyager, 15 March 2016 - 08:57 AM.





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