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ASUS X5DC Laptop won't save CMOS settings


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#1 NightEagle256

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Posted 13 March 2016 - 09:21 AM

Hey guys.

 

Basically the summary of my problem is. One day, I was borrowing my mum's ASUS X5DC laptop for work purposes. Then the screen froze up. I rebooted the laptop and it would no longer boot from the HDD. It kept trying to boot to the PXE and kept failing. I checked the BIOS to see if the HDD was listed. Strangely enough, the HDD was not listed, but also the CD drive was not either. I checked, and when I highlighted the boxes where the HDD/CD drive would be, they magically appeared again, HDD being on the 1st row, CD drive being on the 2nd. So that proved they were still connected. I saved the changes and rebooted. The issue continued. I got frustrated and gave up.

 

Today I continued to try repairing the problem. I did some digging, and some said updating the BIOS solved some of their issues. So I looked for the latest BIOS update for the X5DC laptop, updated, and rebooted back to the BIOS. I did the same method as before, and checked if anything else would help. I saved and rebooted and the problem still persisted. 

 

Quite frankly, I don't know what to do. It may need a new CMOS battery but I really don't know.

 

Hope someone can help me



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#2 JohnC_21

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Posted 13 March 2016 - 10:08 AM

If you are getting the PXE notice then your hard drive may have failed or the issue could be the motherboard. You can pull the hard drive and attach it to another computer using an enclosure or USB adapter and do a diagnostic with Seatools for Windows. If the drive passes but you still get the PXE error then it's likely a motherboard issue.

 

The PXE notice means the computer is trying to boot from a network because it cannot detect a hard drive. 



#3 NightEagle256

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Posted 13 March 2016 - 10:11 AM

If you are getting the PXE notice then your hard drive may have failed or the issue could be the motherboard. You can pull the hard drive and attach it to another computer using an enclosure or USB adapter and do a diagnostic with Seatools for Windows. If the drive passes but you still get the PXE error then it's likely a motherboard issue.

 

The PXE notice means the computer is trying to boot from a network because it cannot detect a hard drive. 

I know the HDD works, as I've tested it on my desktop and transferred important data off it. So it leaves only the mobo.



#4 dc3

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Posted 13 March 2016 - 10:34 AM

Does the date and time change as well?


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#5 Queen-Evie

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Posted 13 March 2016 - 11:28 AM

Quite frankly, I don't know what to do. It may need a new CMOS battery but I really don't know.


I am not an expert in this area. The only thing I have to offer is the only way to find out if it need a new CMOS battery is to get new one to replace the one that is in there now.

dc3 asked about the date and time. If it does change, that is a classic sign the a new CMOS battery is needed.

They do not cost much. In fact, it is probably the least expensive thing in a computer.

If it is not the battery, at least you would not have wasted a lot of money on it.

#6 NightEagle256

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Posted 14 March 2016 - 04:19 AM

Does the date and time change as well?

 

I've never really had a reason to change the date and time. Its correct anyway.

 

 

Quite frankly, I don't know what to do. It may need a new CMOS battery but I really don't know.


I am not an expert in this area. The only thing I have to offer is the only way to find out if it need a new CMOS battery is to get new one to replace the one that is in there now.

dc3 asked about the date and time. If it does change, that is a classic sign the a new CMOS battery is needed.

They do not cost much. In fact, it is probably the least expensive thing in a computer.

If it is not the battery, at least you would not have wasted a lot of money on it.

 

 

I think also the part is proprietary.


Edited by NightEagle256, 14 March 2016 - 04:20 AM.


#7 WebWalker67

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Posted 14 March 2016 - 05:26 AM

If the CMOS battery died, your BIOS setting will be reset and so as the date/time (If the date/time not reset, most likely the date/time is not correct (not current)).

 

Base on our information, the problem might due to dying HDD.

 

You can download the HDD diagnosis program from the HDD maker site and run the said program to check the HDD health.


Edited by WebWalker67, 14 March 2016 - 05:28 AM.


#8 NightEagle256

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Posted 14 March 2016 - 07:20 AM

If the CMOS battery died, your BIOS setting will be reset and so as the date/time (If the date/time not reset, most likely the date/time is not correct (not current)).

 

Base on our information, the problem might due to dying HDD.

 

You can download the HDD diagnosis program from the HDD maker site and run the said program to check the HDD health.

 

Ironically, I changed HDDs with a spare one I had laying around, which I knew worked 100%. Still had the same problem.

 

But the orignial HDD was highlighted as connected when you click Not Connected under IDE Configuration. So the CD Drive and HDD are connected, but the BIOS wont save them.



#9 dc3

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Posted 14 March 2016 - 08:58 AM

I would suggest that you do as JohnC_21 suggested regarding running SeaTools for Windows.  You may be able to connect your hdd to another computer and collect your data, but this is not the same as booting into Windows.

 

Please download and run SeatTools for Windows.
 
Before the installation begins you will be prompted to either Decline or Accept the terms of the installation, click on I Accept.
 
Once the installation begins you will see an image similar to the one below.
 
seagate3_zps1fa1f71c.jpg
 
1.  SeaTools for Windows will search for HDDs and SSDs on your computer.  Please remove any external storage devices connected via USB ports.
 
2.  Detected Drives will list the HDDs and SSDs found.  Place a check mark in the drive box you want to run the scan on.
 
3.  You will see Basic Tests above Detected Drives, move the mouse pointer over this.
 
4.  A menu will open with options for the different scans, please click on Long Generic Test
 
5.  This will start the scan.  When the scan is complete you will see the result under Test Status , please post the results in your topic.
 
 seatools4_zpsd7balf76.png
 
6.  Post the results of the scan in your topic.
 
7.  Click on Help, then click on View Log File.  If the scan failed take a screen shot of the Log File and post it in your topic.

 

 

 

After making a change in the BIOS are you pressing the F10 to save your changes?

 

If you are taking this hdd and installing it in another computer and then trying to boot from it you need to be aware that this is a very bad idea.  There are identifiers related to the motherboard which Windows recognizes, this is how the motherboard is tied to Windows.  If you install this hdd in a computer with a different motherboard Windows will see a different set of identifiers and will basically become confused.  It may not even boot at that point.  If it does there is still a very good chance that the operating system will become so unstable that you will need to reinstall it.

 

I don't see anywhere in this topic that you have stated what operating system you are running.  The reason that this is significant now is because with Windows 8.1 and 10 you can generalize the hdd/ssd which will delete these identifiers and you can then install the hdd in another computer without the potential problems that earlier versions faced if you did this.

 

You posted "I think also the part is proprietary."  The CMOS battery for the ASUS X5DC motherboard is different from the type of battery used in most desktop computers.  This battery has a connector with a pair of leads (black and red) which are connected to the battery which connects to the motherboard.  The CMOS battery used in most desktops simply snaps into place.  In this respect it is proprietary as it is specific to this type of motherboard.  You can see this battery here.


Edited by dc3, 14 March 2016 - 09:00 AM.

Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#10 NightEagle256

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Posted 14 March 2016 - 10:17 AM

After making a change in the BIOS are you pressing the F10 to save your changes?

 

If you are taking this hdd and installing it in another computer and then trying to boot from it you need to be aware that this is a very bad idea.  There are identifiers related to the motherboard which Windows recognizes, this is how the motherboard is tied to Windows.  If you install this hdd in a computer with a different motherboard Windows will see a different set of identifiers and will basically become confused.  It may not even boot at that point.  If it does there is still a very good chance that the operating system will become so unstable that you will need to reinstall it.

 

I don't see anywhere in this topic that you have stated what operating system you are running.  The reason that this is significant now is because with Windows 8.1 and 10 you can generalize the hdd/ssd which will delete these identifiers and you can then install the hdd in another computer without the potential problems that earlier versions faced if you did this.

 

I am pressing F10 every time to save settings.

 

The HDD is the orignial HDD for the laptop

 

The OS is Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit



#11 dc3

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Posted 14 March 2016 - 11:47 AM

Please run the SeaTools for Windows scan and post whether it passed or failed.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#12 mjd420nova

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Posted 14 March 2016 - 12:50 PM

CMOS and BIOS faults are the most difficult to track down but is part of the main board.  Many newer laptops have capacitors built into the chip socket and can't be replaced.  The unit still keeps time and date but can't hold the BIOS settings.  That just points to a faulted chip on the main board.






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