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Using The First Computer.


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#1 ToNaTt346

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Posted 12 March 2016 - 08:49 PM

  I went to research on the way the world can with the Idea of the computer. ENIAC the one first number cruncher 1946 long time, 1822, 1937 Analytical Engine.  I do not know the first real truth. The Abacus this might cause quotes later. Good Thing.


Edited by Orange Blossom, 13 March 2016 - 01:48 AM.
Moved to General Chat. ~ OB


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#2 jcgriff2

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Posted 13 March 2016 - 12:49 AM

Welcome to Bleeping Computer Forums!


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#3 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 13 March 2016 - 08:34 PM

Colossus - Bletchley Park, 1943/44 ?

 

Babbage's Difference Machines, 1825 - 1850. None were originally built but one was built in 2002. 11 Tons for a computer anybody ?

http://www.computerhistory.org/babbage/

 

Chris Cosgrove



#4 ToNaTt346

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Posted 10 April 2016 - 12:56 PM

That was a good one Colossus! Thank-You.



#5 mjd420nova

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Posted 10 April 2016 - 05:07 PM

When you really look at from the proper perspective, any time piece is a computer.  When was the first clock?



#6 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 12 April 2016 - 06:33 PM

Depends on how you define 'clock' !

 

Pre-historic structures like Stonehenge and many others for defining the seasons, Egyptian, Babylonian and Chinese water clocks (1500 to 500 BC ), hour glasses ?

 

These are all essentially analogue methods of telling time to varying degrees of accuracy, just like modern watches and clocks the majority of which use hands being swept around to indicate the time. I'm probably wrong !  I have just mentally counted up the number of digital clocks around the house and I am fairly sure it is more than the number analogue clocks we use !  However, if I want to know the time I am more likely to look at my watch than at the TV set or microwave.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#7 mjd420nova

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Posted 12 April 2016 - 07:39 PM

I was referring to mechanical mechanisms.  Whether to tell time or move water.



#8 rp88

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Posted 21 April 2016 - 01:42 PM

I would count colossus of bletchley park as the first computer, some may debate that earlier devices were also computers a few years before it. A few say that later devices were the first computers because colossus was not purely electronic, but mainly the idea that later devices were the first computers is because colossus was classified until many decades after the war, so only the few who had worked with it knew about it.

Bletchley is now a museum, it's countryside location has been engulfed by the town Milton keynes growing around it, a rebuild of colossus and other wartime equipment is on show there and are sometimes run for demonstrations of how the originals were used.

As for earlier devices with computer-like properties one interesting one which you could say was the first "robot" was the governor device on steam engines (centrifugal governor) this was an ingenious little thing developed by James watt for keeping steam engines from going out of control without need for a human monitoring them. This system was perhaps one of the first to use a negative feedback loop, this way if the engine (we're talking mills and water pumps here not trains) ran too fast or too slow the heavy balls on the arms would rise or drop under "centrifugal force" and thereby lift into place or drop out of place a valve which cut off the supply to the steam engine so that it would be regulated. Really simple but very clever and elegant.

Edited by rp88, 21 April 2016 - 01:52 PM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB




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