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Questions about replacing failing hard drive


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#1 skymaster191

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Posted 12 March 2016 - 03:43 PM

My hard drive is failing. It's making grinding sounds.

This is the info on my desktop PC

 

home built PC from 2010

3.1 Ghz CPU

4 GB RAM

Windows 7 Home Premium for system builders

ASUS mother board M4A78LT-M LE supports SATA 3GB/s and USB 2.0

DVD/CD drive

 

I already have a new WD black internal hard drive (SATA, 7200 RPM, 500GB 64MB Cache) ready to install. But I am waiting to buy an external USB hard drive as a backup. Could you please answer each question?

 

Can I cherry pick items I want to save such as documents, files, media from one hard drive to an external drive, and then clone or backup a different hard drive to this same USB external hard drive?

 

Also, the user guide for my motherboard says it supports USB 2.0. Is this referring to the motherboard USB ports or the motherboard itself? So if I install a USB 3.0 adapter card in my PCI slot, will this board rated at USB 2.0 now support USB 3.0?

 

If I used USB 2.0 to backup 200GB to an external hard drive, how many hours would it take?

 

Does it make sense to backup a 500GB internal hard drive with a 500GB USB external hard drive?

 

 

 

 



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#2 Niweg

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Posted 12 March 2016 - 05:21 PM

 

I already have a new WD black internal hard drive (SATA, 7200 RPM, 500GB 64MB Cache) ready to install. But I am waiting to buy an external USB hard drive as a backup. Could you please answer each question?

 

Can I cherry pick items I want to save such as documents, files, media from one hard drive to an external drive, and then clone or backup a different hard drive to this same USB external hard drive?

 

Also, the user guide for my motherboard says it supports USB 2.0. Is this referring to the motherboard USB ports or the motherboard itself? So if I install a USB 3.0 adapter card in my PCI slot, will this board rated at USB 2.0 now support USB 3.0?

 

If I used USB 2.0 to backup 200GB to an external hard drive, how many hours would it take?

 

Does it make sense to backup a 500GB internal hard drive with a 500GB USB external hard drive?

 

 

 

 

 

 I'm not sure what you mean about cherry picking.  I always do full system backups because it's cheap and easy these days, and I know I won't forget to back up something I'll need later.  It's almost imperative that you have a full system backup in case you have a hard drive failure too.  You can put things other than the backup image on the external drive, if that's what you want to do.

 

 I'd think a PCI or PCIe adapter to give you USB3 would be fine.  I did that with a now 6 year old HP desktop, and it works just fine.

 

 Backing up 200 GB via USB 2 should take about 2.5 hours give or take a few minutes depending on what software you use.  I backed up about 100 GB just yesterday to a USB 2 attached hard drive and it took just about an hour.  I used Norton Ghost 15 under Windows 7 Pro.  Since Ghost doesn't work with 8 or 10, I normally use Easeus Todo Backup with it.  It takes longer than Ghost to run.

 

 I wouldn't skimp on the size of the external hard drive.  I was looking at some ads earlier today and the price difference between a 500 GB and 1 TB drive was $5.  Personally I'm using 2 & 3 TB drives for backups - you can buy 3 TB ones for around $80 these days, giving yourself plenty of room for the future.

 

 Good luck.


Make regular full system backups or you'll be sorry sooner or later.


#3 RolandJS

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Posted 12 March 2016 - 05:30 PM

You cannot both clone and backup or folder/file copy [cherry-picking] onto the same external hard-drive.  You can full-image backup and folder/file copy [cherry-pick] onto one external hard-drive [as long as bytespace allows]; you can clone a hard-drive onto said external hard-drive.  You cannot eat your cake [clone] and you cannot have your cake [backup] -- Miguel de Cervantes revisited.


Edited by RolandJS, 12 March 2016 - 05:32 PM.

"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#4 hamluis

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Posted 12 March 2016 - 05:37 PM

Of course you can backup and clone to the same drive...as llong as there are separate partitions for each.

 

If I have a 1TB hard drive and clone a 500MB partition to it...that still leaves me 500GB of space which I can partition and use for backups and other file storage.

 

Louis

 

Corrected 500MB to 500GB :scratchhead: , don't know what happened to my brain :).


Edited by hamluis, 13 March 2016 - 10:31 AM.


#5 skymaster191

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Posted 12 March 2016 - 11:33 PM

Ahhh.......................I sense now that clone and full system backup mean two different things. I didn't pick up on this before. What is the difference? I better understand this before I proceed.

 

Do you think I should chance cloning or backing up everything from old to new drive? Someone told me that cloning could transfer corrupt data and errors to new drive? Even though my hard seems to be going bad, the PC seems to perform quite well. The WD hard drive I purchased comes with Acronis cloning/backup software.

 

I also ran CheckDisk through Windows 7. I don't know if it's a good indicator of hard drive health. But it reported the hard drive as clean.

 

I'd like to avoid reinstalling OS and everything else from scratch. It's a pain in the neck and takes a long time even though I still have the installation CD's and license codes

 

And I understand that you're saying it's better to transfer date to a new drive with greater volume. Makes sense to me


Edited by skymaster191, 13 March 2016 - 02:33 AM.


#6 RolandJS

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Posted 13 March 2016 - 08:28 AM

Of course you can backup and clone to the same drive...as llong as there are separate partitions for each.

Louis

I was assuming he only had one partition on that one external hard-drive  :)


"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#7 RolandJS

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Posted 13 March 2016 - 08:35 AM

Ahhh.......................I sense now that clone and full system backup mean two different things. I didn't pick up on this before. What is the difference? I better understand this before I proceed. Do you think I should chance cloning or backing up everything from old to new drive? Someone told me that cloning could transfer corrupt data and errors to new drive? Even though my hard seems to be going bad, the PC seems to perform quite well. The WD hard drive I purchased comes with Acronis cloning/backup software. I also ran CheckDisk through Windows 7. I don't know if it's a good indicator of hard drive health. But it reported the hard drive as clean. I'd like to avoid reinstalling OS and everything else from scratch. It's a pain in the neck and takes a long time even though I still have the installation CD's and license codes. And I understand that you're saying it's better to transfer date to a new drive with greater volume. Makes sense to me.

Cloning also captures anything you improve.  Do at least two OS partition full images and at least two data partition full images onto your external hard-drive; do you have only partition on your external HD?  Or more than one partition?  Auslogics Disk Defrag includes a good SMART function to check hard-drives - I think it can also check external [as well as internal] hard-drives.


Edited by RolandJS, 13 March 2016 - 08:36 AM.

"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#8 skymaster191

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Posted 13 March 2016 - 10:31 AM

I didn't buy an external hard drive yet,

 

By the way, the new Western Digital hard drive did not come with any CD or instructions from Newegg. Just the drive and nothing else. Is that normal?



#9 dc3

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Posted 13 March 2016 - 10:58 AM

Yes, it is normal to not receive anything other than the new HDD.  

 

Since you are posting that you are using Windows 7 (I'm assuming that you have SP1 installed) I will assume that you plan on installing Windows 7 SP1 on your new HDD.  The installation of this operating system will have all you need to prepare the HDD for the installation of Windows 7.  You will have the choice of just how much of the HDD to you want to use for the partition Windows will be installed on.  You then have the choice of what format you want to use, FAT 32 or NTFS.  From there the installation is just a matter of doing what you are prompted to do during the installation.

 

There is another option you could choose.  That would be to clone you current operating system and use this to install the the operating system.

 

One of the more popular cloning programs suggested here at Bleeping Computer is Macrium Reflect.

 

There is a good tutorial for Macrium Reflect, it can be found here.


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#10 skymaster191

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Posted 13 March 2016 - 11:39 AM

Ok. Thanks. I have Windows 7 Home Premium for system builders. I didn't figure installing a hard drive would be too complicated since I did it five years ago. And I know about plugging  in SATA and power. Thought I might need instructions just in case.

 

I'm probably going to install everything from scratch since I have everything I need.

 

I always prefer NTFS



#11 dc3

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Posted 13 March 2016 - 12:38 PM

Realistically, NTFS is the only way to go.  The FAT32 format has a file size limit of 4GB, NTFS has a file size limitation of ~4GB.

 

If you want a comprehensive installation guide for Windows 7 wikiHow has a good one.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#12 skymaster191

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Posted 13 March 2016 - 09:11 PM

Hey, thanks for the help

 

OK, so I'm up and running with this new hard drive. I'm in the process of re-installing, downloading, and importing everything I need. I didn't do the clone option since I don't have the software for it.

 

My OS is already on NTFS. I checked.

One question. When I hooked up the SATA DATA and power to the drive, I also noticed an 8-pin connection on the drive. There were no corresponding wire connectors for this in the PC case. I don't need this....correct? What is this for?



#13 JohnC_21

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Posted 13 March 2016 - 10:01 PM

I believe that is your jumper block. Default is no jumper. 

 

http://www.wdc.com/En/library/sata/2079-001042.pdf



#14 MadmanRB

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Posted 13 March 2016 - 10:28 PM

Disk cloning is indeed the best way to do things for failing hard drives, sure you pick up junk files from your old drive but thats normal


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#15 skymaster191

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Posted 13 March 2016 - 10:29 PM

Ok.. Thanks

 

I thought my hard drive would come with cloning/backup software? It did not.


Edited by skymaster191, 14 March 2016 - 10:14 AM.





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