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Is Command Line Common to All Linux Versions?


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#1 LittleGreenDots

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Posted 12 March 2016 - 03:27 PM

I want to get away from "Windows on My World" (as MS' spying is going on steroids in W10) and want to try Linux, probably Ubuntu or Mint.  I like having reference material at hand and want to pick up some reading material (book) to explore the Linux world.  I note that there are books on Ubuntu and less on Mint.  However, there are quite a few on the command lines.  Do all the Linux releases use the same line commands?

 

Thanks.



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#2 MadmanRB

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Posted 12 March 2016 - 03:34 PM

Virtually, Mint is based on Ubuntu so one to one the commands will work.

Really the only real thing that makes distros different are the package manager back-ends (package managers are the linux way to install software), but pretty much universally command line is the same in linux.


Edited by MadmanRB, 12 March 2016 - 03:36 PM.

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#3 LittleGreenDots

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Posted 12 March 2016 - 05:58 PM

Thanks.  I've been watching YouTube videos on Linux distros and everyone seems to be talking with the desktop screen in front basically doing nothing.  I did watch a few videos on command lines.  I want to see the program in action and am wondering things like (with either Ubuntu or Mint) how often I'll have to use command line to get things done?  Can I copy files, move things around, delete files, etc. in either of this distros without going to command line?  Also I see different people talking about Virtual Machine and running Linux in there.  Is that an advantage?  I think I saw a video some time ago about VM as a way of testing software to see if it is bundled with bad things.  No?  I watched a video on installing it on Windows and it was a little involved.  Is this the same program? Is there an advantage to dual booting and having it on the hard drive (the Linux distros)?

 

Thanks.

 

Wow, MadmanRB, I noticed something...at this very moment you are listed as posting 666 posts, and you also say that you are under my bed.  With that number of posts, I suggest when you're under my bed, you look over your shoulder and see who else is there with you.


Edited by LittleGreenDots, 12 March 2016 - 06:00 PM.


#4 MadmanRB

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Posted 12 March 2016 - 06:03 PM

Pretty much every function in linux can be done in both command line and GUI.

The only reason why command line is used is that its the linux universal standard, now that may seem antiquated but its mainly from linux having so many user interfaces.

But simple stuff like moving and deleting files can all be done in the gui.

Really the only reason to do command line is more compex commands like grant superuser (admin) privileges to certain operations.

Have you ever used android? Android is linux, no command line there.


Edited by MadmanRB, 12 March 2016 - 06:03 PM.

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#5 raw

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Posted 12 March 2016 - 06:05 PM

It depends on the default shell. most *nix systems use bash,

which will all use the same syntax. (this is also true for Bourne and Korn shells)

In a rare (extremely rare) situation you might encounter the C shell (tcsh also)

which use completely different commands.


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#6 MadmanRB

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Posted 12 March 2016 - 06:10 PM

It depends on the default shell. most *nix systems use bash,

which will all use the same syntax. (this is also true for Bourne and Korn shells)

In a rare (extremely rare) situation you might encounter the C shell (tcsh also)

which use completely different commands.

 

Yeah but most distros use bash.

Ubuntu uses bash as does Mint, no need to muddle the waters


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#7 LittleGreenDots

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Posted 12 March 2016 - 06:21 PM

No, please don't muddle the water, but only if it conceals the sharks.



#8 MadmanRB

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Posted 12 March 2016 - 06:31 PM

Mind you yes there are different command line back ends in linux but that is more of a right tool for the right job sort of thing.

But the most common tool is the Phillips head screwdriver, bash is that screwdriver.

Cshell and tcsh are more like crescent wrenches and pliers


Edited by MadmanRB, 12 March 2016 - 06:35 PM.

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#9 Guest_hollowface_*

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Posted 12 March 2016 - 07:51 PM

want to try Linux, probably Ubuntu or Mint.

Both of those are great choices for a beginner (or expert). They are also both distributed in a live form, which means you can try the OS from the installation medium, before you install it. Keep in mind that it will typically run slower in try-mode than when actually installed because DVDs/CDs/flashdrives tend to have slow read-speeds/write-speeds/access-times.

Do all the Linux releases use the same line commands?

A commandline is a combination of a shell (application used to execute commands), and any applications you execute from it. Most distros use Bash as their shell, but it's by no means the only shell available. Different shells have different features, but the command used to execute a given program is the same, because it is determined by the program not the shell. The applications installed will vary from distro to distro. If an application isn't installed you can install it, though the ease of this proceedure will depend on the distro being used. Both Linux Mint and Ubuntu make
it easy to install a large number of applications you're likely to want.

am wondering things like (with either Ubuntu or Mint) how often I'll have to use command line to get things done?

Depends on your usage. You should expect to use the commandline atleast a bit, as it's quite common to use it when troubleshooting. While many people don't take this advice, I would suggest you never run any command you don't understand. Look it up, or ask. This applies even when a command is suggested by someone you trust, because they could have made an unnoticed typo, or the command could require adaption to your usage senario (and they may have assumed you'd know this).

Can I copy files, move things around, delete files, etc. in either of this distros without going to command line?

Yes. Both Linux Mint and Ubuntu come with a file-manager application. On Windows the file-manager application is "explorer.exe". On Ubuntu it's Nautilus, on Linux Mint it's Caja or Nemo (depending on Linux Mint flavor). You can install others! Additionally both of these distros come with tweaked settings to make it easy to mount drive partitions from the file-manager by clicking on them.

I see different people talking about Virtual Machine and running Linux in there.  Is that an advantage?

If you have a computer powerful enough to run a virtual machine, they can be very useful for testing Linux distros, because if you botch something while fiddling around, you haven't damaged your main OS. They are also a great option for people who have never tried Linux, and wish to get to know it without installing it on their computer, because they don't know if they'll want to keep it.

Is there an advantage to dual booting

Sure. Dual-booting, triple-booting, multi-booting, etc, allows you to have multiple operating systems rather than committing to one. This can be a great option for people whom have Windows, but are starting to learn Linux, because they can take a break from Linux if they need, which is useful if they need to do something, but haven't yet figured out how accomplish it under Linux. I usually advise newcomers to dual-boot rather than outright ditch Windows, especially if they've never actually tried Linux before, just in case they hate it. What OS to use, is a big decision.

 

 



#10 LittleGreenDots

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Posted 12 March 2016 - 10:32 PM

thanks for all this info.  i'll have to decide which one, ubuntu or mint.



#11 MadmanRB

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Posted 12 March 2016 - 10:57 PM

You may just want to wait the next month or so out so you can just get Ubuntu 16.04, the next long term release of that distro.

Ubuntu follows a 6 month release cycle you see, the first in April and the other in October.

Every even numbered year such as 2014 and 2016 the .04 release will be the Ubuntu long term support release, the nest one 16.04 will be supported until the year 2021.

The ones in between such as 14.10, 15.04 and 15.10 only have 9 month support windows, these are just interim versions.

The LTS upgrade path is very recommended as opposed to jumping between the minor versions.

Just keep backups around and mind when the next versions come out.

The next LTS will hit in 2018


Edited by MadmanRB, 12 March 2016 - 10:59 PM.

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#12 LittleGreenDots

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Posted 13 March 2016 - 04:56 AM

Thanks MMRB.



#13 MadmanRB

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Posted 13 March 2016 - 05:22 AM

I mean you could install Ubuntu 15.10 but it's only going to be useful for about a month at this point and if you add software into it some of it may go away during the upgrade. You could also install Linux Mint 17.3 but you would have to wait about one to two months there for it to have a major upgrade as it is normally two months behind the Ubuntu release even now that it's only using long-term support releases as its back end. Linux Mint 17.3 is based on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

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#14 pcpunk

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Posted 13 March 2016 - 01:21 PM

Not a difficult choice for me, Mint good till April 2019

https://www.linuxmint.com/download_all.php

 

Don't forget this quote, you can run these live anytime you like to get used to it, see if you like and which one you like.  

hollowface quote:  They are also both distributed in a live form, which means you can try the OS from the installation medium, before you install it. Keep in mind that it will typically run slower in try-mode than when actually installed because DVDs/CDs/flashdrives tend to have slow read-speeds/write-speeds/access-times.

If someone is in need of a question to do something in their Specific OS, I will boot that one up, run it and find an answer for them.  Many of us have multiple Operating systems on disk or USB to boot and test or in Virtual Machine.

 

 

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Edited by pcpunk, 13 March 2016 - 01:21 PM.

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#15 Guest_PCNetSpec_*

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Posted 13 March 2016 - 04:33 PM

Mint good till April 2019

 

 

Is that strictly true ?l security update

 

I'm assuming when Mint changed from the 3.13 kernel series in 17.2 and 17.3 that they did so via the Ubuntu repos and the LTS Enablement stack ?

 

If this is the case, Mint 17.2 (with its 3.16 kernel) is only FULLY supported until August 2016 the same as Ubuntu 14.04.2

 

and Mint 17.3 (with its 3.19 kernel) is again only FULLY supported until August 2016 the same as Ubuntu 14.04.3

 

Only 17 and 17.1 use the 3.13 kernel which is FULLY supported until 2019 the same as Ubuntu 14.04 and 14.04.1

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Releases

you'd have to downgrade the kernel and xorg stack in 17.2 and 17.3 to match their support length.

 

Now whilst I know Mint freeze the kernels .. bit AFAIK they still receive kernel "security" updates .. or am I misunderstanding how Mint update (or not) their kernel ?


Edited by PCNetSpec, 13 March 2016 - 04:38 PM.





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