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(D)DoS Attacks and PC's


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#1 HououinKyouma

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Posted 11 March 2016 - 02:37 AM

So from my understanding, anything connected to the internet that accepts packets can be ddosed.

This being true (correct me if i'm wrong there) I wondered how you would protect your computer/network from this type of attack.

I'm sort of expecting a remarkably simple answer here, it seems like i'm missing something very obvious.



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#2 Didier Stevens

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Posted 13 March 2016 - 10:05 AM

You mean your computer at home?


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#3 ScathEnfys

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Posted 13 March 2016 - 12:54 PM

Your home network is highly unlikely to ever be targeted. That being said, the best you can do to protect your home network would be to configure a firewall on your router to drop any unanticipated packets.
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#4 quietman7

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Posted 13 March 2016 - 05:47 PM

A DOS (Denial-of-Service) / DDOS (Distributed Denial-of-Service) Attack typically target sites or services hosted on high-profile web servers such as banks, credit card payment gateways, and root nameservers. The attacks involve saturating the target machine with so many external communications requests that it cannot respond to legitimate traffic, or responds so slowly that it is essentially rendered useless. As noted by ScathEnfys...Home users are highly unlikely to ever be targeted or subject to a DoS/DDoS attack.

When an attempt originates from a single host of the network, it constitutes a DOS attack. When the attempt originates from multiple malicious hosts in an effort to coordinate to flood the victim with an abundance of attack packets, so that the attack takes place simultaneously from multiple points, it is a DDOS attack.
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#5 HououinKyouma

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Posted 15 March 2016 - 03:28 AM

Sorry if this caused any confusion, yes i did mean a personal network, and yes i do know what they are typically used for. Just curious as to what would need to be done to prevent one.



#6 HououinKyouma

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Posted 15 March 2016 - 04:13 AM

Your home network is highly unlikely to ever be targeted. That being said, the best you can do to protect your home network would be to configure a firewall on your router to drop any unanticipated packets.

Thanks for an answer to my actual question. ;)



#7 quietman7

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Posted 15 March 2016 - 06:01 AM

It wasn't a matter of confusion so no need to apologize. We ask certain questions and provide more information rather than less in order to ensure we address your posting as well as others who may read the topic.
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#8 Didier Stevens

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Posted 15 March 2016 - 03:36 PM

There's nothing you can do against a DDoS when you are a "standard" ISP subscriber. The bandwidth of your ISP connection is so low, compared with the bandwidths that DDoSes take up nowadays, that your connection will always saturate. Filtering at your end will not make a difference.

 

Theoretically speaking, your ISP could do something, by filtering before the packets enter your connection (for example by filtering at the edges of their network), but practically they don't do that because it requires resources e.g. money.

 

If we are talking about a server, then you can buy protection. You might have noticed an error message from CloudFlare when you browse to the BC forums but don't get a reply. CloudFlare is a company that offers (D)DoS protection, Bleeping Computer is a customer.

 

PS: to (D)DoS your connection the attackers need to know your IP address.


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#9 ScathEnfys

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Posted 16 March 2016 - 10:27 AM

A DDoS attack cannot be blocked by a home network, true. A DoS attack though might be able to be blocked with a correctly configured firewall (drops instead of denials).
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#10 HououinKyouma

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Posted 17 March 2016 - 08:01 PM

It wasn't a matter of confusion so no need to apologize. We ask certain questions and provide more information rather than less in order to ensure we address your posting as well as others who may read the topic.

I see, that makes sense.



#11 quietman7

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Posted 17 March 2016 - 08:13 PM

:thumbup2:
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#12 trelod91

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Posted 19 March 2016 - 01:56 PM

That is interesting! Can you tell me how to instal a firewall on my router and how to configure drop? Thanks!






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